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I just had a very weird edit on my answer: https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/8810118. It was rejected because of a conflict, but that's not the point.

What's weird for me: Someone formatted random words which are reserved words in Java, but in this case they were not used as Java code. Humans should be able to recognize this little difference, instead, it looks more like machine-generated formatting to me. Also the replacement of the word "Analyzing" by "Analysing" doesn't make sense for me because both words are accepted as correct spelling in English.

Do such edits occur more often? Are there people who try to improve their reputation in this way?

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    People have used bots to do mass edits in the past – Joe W Jul 15 '15 at 14:34
  • Replacement of Analyzing by Analyzing? there's a typo somewhere :P – Patrice Jul 15 '15 at 14:35
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    No, edits like these are pretty commonly done by people, not machines. – Hans Passant Jul 15 '15 at 14:47
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    Makes sense if you think about it. Robo-reviewers, robo-editors... – BoltClock Jul 15 '15 at 14:55
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    I hope they see the irony in making pointless edits to get points. – NathanOliver Jul 15 '15 at 14:58
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    We really should be making these edits audits - that way we can truly call them machine-generated, and get anybody trying to approve these edits banned in the process. Win-win. – BoltClock Jul 15 '15 at 15:07
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    @BoltClock I once posted a feature-request for this and other automatically generated audits: Generate new types of audits for the Suggested Edits queue . – S.L. Barth Jul 15 '15 at 15:23
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    @S.L. Barth: I like it. – BoltClock Jul 15 '15 at 15:27
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    This is a site used by programmers. Programmers often create software tools to help facilitate arduous tasks. Someone's got a userscript that's behaving badly. – Will Jul 15 '15 at 17:01
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    did you notice edit summary in there? "user reability". Wow. Just... wow – gnat Jul 15 '15 at 23:50
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    Guys? Apparently, this user has been making loads of those sorts of edits, and some may even need to be reverted: stackoverflow.com/users/4519308/… – APerson Jul 16 '15 at 17:20
  • @gnat: Here's the kicker - they're not actually saying that to troll. Everyone I've asked who makes these edits honestly believes that they improve readability. Yet another case for it being a cultural/locale thing. – BoltClock Jul 18 '15 at 7:39
  • As for your actual question, there hasn't been any disclosed instances of autonomous edits. I once thought of raising a bot that does so but ended up ditching the project. – Unihedron Jul 18 '15 at 7:49
  • @BoltClock I know. Been doing something like that myself in the distant past (maybe not as hilarious but still). Culture or not, but I seriously believed that it's helpful. Two weeks of edit-ban made me realise that it ain't exactly so, thanks to reviewers who made enough rejects to trigger it – gnat Jul 18 '15 at 8:59
  • "Guys? Apparently, this user has been making loads of those sorts of edits, and some may even need to be reverted" What's the difference between a karma whore and a vandal who appears to be using a (nearly) mechanistic editing script? I looked at two edits, rolled back one as being exactly like the OP issue including the weird bolding and "user readability" explanation. – msw Jul 18 '15 at 15:02
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This edit is probably not the result of a machine, but of an actual human being.

Someone formatted random words which are reserved words in Java but in this case they were not used as Java code. Humans should be able to recognize this little difference, instead, it looks more like machine-generated formatting to me.

Humans should be able to recognize this difference, but that doesn't mean the editor cares. If they think it should be highlighted, often they will inline code format whatever they find important. They'll also code format anything they register as a "function" or "keyword" without bothering to read the context of it. It's rather common, actually, for newer editors to misunderstand what that formatting is for, or just to not care and use it how they see fit.

Also the replacement of the word "Analyzing" by "Analysing" doesn't make sense for me because both words are accepted as correct spelling in English.

You are correct. Both spellings are correct spellings in one region or another. But not everyone realizes that. In fact, my browser's spell-check says that "analysing" is incorrect. These localized spellings can confuse people who don't know about the other form. Add to that a spell checker that doesn't account for British spelling, or, if you're using a British spell checker, one that doesn't account for American spellings, and you may have users "correcting" already correct spellings.

As explained in another Meta answer*, there is nothing wrong with American spellings over British, or British over American. If this is the entirety of a change or the rest of the change is equally as pointless, it should be rejected or, if already approved, rolled back.

Do such edits occour more often? Are there people who try to improve their reputation in this way?

Pointless edits like these do indeed happen. Sometimes they are a simple misunderstanding of how editing should be used, and sometimes they are simply an attempt to gain that "+2" for doing the smallest amount of work possible.

The best you can do is reject edits that do not improve the post, if they occur on your post, or edit further to actually make the post better and potentially remove unneccessary code formatting if you see it's gotten approved. Once you hit 2k rep, you'll be able to review these suggested edits in queue and help actually improve these posts that are having pointless edits suggested for them.

As Brad Larson pointed out, if you see a pattern of these kinds of edits by a user being made in a very short amount of time and getting approved when they should not, you can flag as "Other" for a moderator. Explain what's going on, link to the reviews of the edits that were approved, and if the moderator feels there is a problem, they can temporarily suspend a user from suggesting edits.

*The revision history of that answer is a decent example of pointless edits as well. Thanks to Deduplicator for suggesting to look at it.

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    And if this is really becoming a problem (a user rapidly suggesting piles of them and the edits getting approved), you could flag down a moderator. We can now impose temporary editing bans that can stop this and cause the editors to review how their edits were being received. I applied one of those in this case after seeing edits like this being approved: stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/8749277 – Brad Larson Jul 15 '15 at 15:46
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    @BradLarson I hope a series of review bans were also imposed. Just look at the edit history of that user.... – S.L. Barth Jul 15 '15 at 18:37
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    @S.L.Barth - This is a case where audits took care of these reviewers before I could. For the complaints on Meta about bad audits, these worked just as intended. – Brad Larson Jul 15 '15 at 19:07
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    ahem s/British/English/ – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 15 '15 at 19:41
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Where do you see that I need to make that change? I'm not seeing where it's wrong myself. – Kendra Jul 15 '15 at 19:44
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    @Kendra: It was a cheeky reference to the fact that the term "English" already means, by definition, the language spoken in England (which is already in Britain) at any given point and that, as such, "British English" has a redundancy. DRY! And then, by extension, calling it simply "British" is just wrong. ;) – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 15 '15 at 19:51
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit I see what you did there. :) I was starting to think it might have been a case of I wasn't clear I wasn't speaking of English the language rather than British as a localization. Thanks for clearing that up! – Kendra Jul 15 '15 at 19:54
  • @Kendra: No problem :P – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 15 '15 at 19:55
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Well where I'm from, English without any qualifier is understood to mean American English. So British English is a valid thing to say when one wants to be specific. – mason Jul 15 '15 at 19:58
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    @mason: The term makes no sense outside of that ethnocentrist jingoism, is what I'm saying. I mean, of course it means that to you. You're an American. But y'know not everyone is... – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 15 '15 at 19:59
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit I know not everyone is. Not everyone is from England either. That's why it's handy to say "British English" when referring to the English spoken over there, even if it sounds a little redundant. – mason Jul 16 '15 at 2:18
  • OMG just saw the edit history (meta.stackoverflow.com/posts/252504/revisions). There are enough 'true' mistakes on StackExchange to not waste time with such edits – Daniel Alder Jul 16 '15 at 7:35
  • @mason: Didn't say everyone was from England. I pointed out that the phrase is objectively strange and odd no matter where you're from. Never mind – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 16 '15 at 9:26
  • @DanielAlder worth noting that this is meta guidance, intended to be used a lot to resolve tricky situations (one you referred has about 8K views, that's really a lot for meta). Worth investing some extra effort into polishing it (although edits history looks indeed funny) – gnat Jul 18 '15 at 9:10
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit it may be a redundant term (and I disagree on that), but in any case it is commonly used. The OED defines British English as the English language as spoken or written in the British Isles; esp. the forms of English usual in Great Britain, as contrasted with those characteristic of the U.S.A. or other English-speaking countries.. It is very common to see comparison between AE and BE (see for instance en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… or the many questions on EL&U ). – nico Jul 18 '15 at 14:34

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