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It seems like most questions these days are of low quality in the web development related tags; specifically php and jQuery.

Perhaps more privileges for proven users, instead of the current archaic moderator => user paradigm we are using?

I would suggest that normal users are able to place questions on hold, effective immediately. Then moderators simply have to review these actions. If a user is found to be abusing these privileges, the moderator has the option to remove the user's privilege.

This makes more sense to me. It is a blacklist approach against the archaic whitelist approach.

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    Pot, meet kettle. I suggest you add some examples and suggestions to your question. Explain that this is in fact a problem that has to be taken care of. Also, "low quality" is not "spam".
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 13, 2015 at 9:53
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    "Then moderators simply have to review these actions." Because SO's moderators are sitting on their butts all day refreshing the flag queue, right?
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 13, 2015 at 9:54
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    @Cerbrus SO has websockets, therefore your point is invalid. As for examples, why don't you just open a tag like PHP or jQuery for an example. Its horrible. Nothing but broken english and clear lack of understanding of fundamental web technologies.
    – r3wt
    Jul 13, 2015 at 9:57
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    Obviously my comment wasn't about the insignificant effort required to load the flag queue. What I was trying to say is that SO's moderators are busy enough as it is. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying all questions are "Good" or even "mediocre". All I'm saying is: Your idea really isn't that good, in my opinion. Sure, there are plenty of bad questions, but handing more work over to the moderators isn't the solution.
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 13, 2015 at 9:59
  • Users start this "How do we improve the quality of questions" discussion multiple times each week. If there was a solution to the problem, we'd have found it by now.
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 13, 2015 at 10:04
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    Very hard to talk about this in a constructive way. Hyperbole is probably the worst way to go about it. Your proposal has some merits but it isn't going to go anywhere when you try to make your point by exaggerating the problem. There's no need. You'll have to get rid of "spam" to be taken seriously. Jul 13, 2015 at 10:11
  • @Cerbrus That may be true, but i'm not sorry. This question needs to be asked as many times as it takes to motivate TPB, or atleast a suitable explanation exists for failure to implement new strategies. It could very well be(and probably is) that the architechture makes change difficult.
    – r3wt
    Jul 13, 2015 at 10:12
  • @HansPassant: I did my best, below. r3wt: Asking it as many times as it takes doesn't fix the problem. If you're so sure the architecture is the problem, explain why. SO's team will gladly listen if you come up with some good reasons as to why the system's broken.
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 13, 2015 at 10:26
  • @Cerbrus I'm alluding to the fact that my proposed changes may not be feasible for the architecture. I am not, nor would i ever insult the SO team or their architechture, which from what i have read is some of the most efficient software ever written. This all runs on only 16 boxes... Im not saying the system is broken. perhaps the barrier for moderator needs to be lowered, due to the popularity of SO.
    – r3wt
    Jul 13, 2015 at 10:29
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    Moderator note: Let's be civil and constructive in comments please.
    – Jon Clements Mod
    Jul 13, 2015 at 10:45
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    @Cerbrus perhaps i am too far out there again. after all, i have been programming all night in C(sensors) and PHP(endpoint) and drinking for the last few hours. I will revisit tomorrow when sober and try to expand on my thoughts.
    – r3wt
    Jul 13, 2015 at 11:19
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    If you'd have mentioned that drinking sooner, I wouldn't have bothered arguing.
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 13, 2015 at 11:22
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    @Cerbrus Alright, i will revisit when sober and attempt to propose a useful solution.
    – r3wt
    Jul 13, 2015 at 11:28
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    Have you tried reviewing yourself yet? You have more than 500 rep so you can do at least some queues. Try it out, especially "triage". Get an idea of what the site already catches BEFORE you get to see it.
    – Gimby
    Jul 13, 2015 at 12:42
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    I'm guessing the OP doesn't want to revisit this question, after all.
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 15, 2015 at 5:51

1 Answer 1

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I disagree with this suggestion:

  • "It seems like most questions these days are spam."
    Semantics, but "Low quality" does not equal "Spam".
    Sure, there are plenty of bad questions out there, but in my experience, a majority of the posted questions are good enough to answer. Those that aren't often get downvoted, closed, or mjölnir'd quick enough.

  • "Perhaps more privileges for proven users, instead of the current archaic moderator => user paradigm we are using?"
    All I can say here: "archaic", how? Your question fails to illustrate how the current system is problematic. The current close-vote system appears to be working quite effectively. Really bad questions often get as low as -15. By then, higher rep users have often cast delete votes already. (All in my own experience)

  • "I would suggest that normal users are able to place questions on hold, effective immediately. Then moderators simply have to review these actions."
    I think this is a very bad idea. This would allow any normal person that hasn't proven himself on the site, to close any question he wants. This will only result in more flags and meta posts about unjustly closed questions. Not to mention the extreme work load this adds to the already very busy moderation team.

  • "If a user is found to be abusing these privileges, the moderator has the option to remove the users privilege."
    SO doesn't touch a user's privileges, when a users breaks some rules. Suspensions, sure... But what's to stop a user from simply creating a new account if his account can't lock questions any more?

  • "It's a blacklist approach against the archaic whitelist approach."
    A "whitelist approach" which would work just fine for smaller communities, but isn't manageable for a site as large as SO.

I can appreciate the attempt at fixing SO's problems, but SO's regulars / moderators / staff are well aware of the issues. If there were a good solution, even one as radical as totally re-engineering the system, it would have been implemented already.

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  • unfortunately the comment format of SO doesn't give me a good way of rebutting your individual points
    – r3wt
    Jul 13, 2015 at 10:33
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    "in my experience, a majority of the posted questions are good enough to answer". In the python and java tags, a majority of the questions is technically answerable, which is vastly different from being "good enough to answer" - as in, most questions are abhorrent crap that will never be a useful reference for somebody else, and IMO answering them actively makes the site worse. And all of the boderline crap (vague BS where you have to guess what OP wants, typos, brain farts, XY problems etc) does usually not get closed unless being called out on meta, people happily answer all of those.
    – l4mpi
    Jul 13, 2015 at 11:26
  • @l4mpi: I don't frequent those tags. I had no idea the users' behavior is that different on those tags.
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 13, 2015 at 11:39
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    There are some users that do care about question quality in those tags, but they're few and far between. Here's a recent example of a question that was answered despite needing closure - and that's one of the better ones as at least OP is able to communicate their requirement and posts some code (even though the code does not demonstrate the error they claim to get). Then there's crap like this which is a simple brain fart / failure to read the docs but four people rush to answer it...
    – l4mpi
    Jul 13, 2015 at 12:05

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