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When you place a bounty on a question, if the bounty expires you have a grace period to award the bounty. If you don't, the answer with the highest up-vote (min of 2) will receive half the bounty.

I asked this question and after it received no correct answer, I placed a 100 pt bounty on it. No one answered with a correct answer, so the bounty expired and disappeared without being awarded as the above conditions were not met. I later added new information I gathered to the question, it didn't receive an answer, so I placed a 200 pt bounty on it. Now that has expired, but there is no correct answer yet. There is however an answer that has 5 up-votes. I assume those who are up-voting believe it did answer the question as the screenshots show exactly what I'm looking for. But they have not ran the app using the provided project, because that would reveal the screenshots provided do not match what actually occurs, and it doesn't meet the requirements laid out in the question. I explained exactly why that answer doesn't solve the problem in the comments underneath the answer. The poster said they would try to fix it, but has not changed the answer - that was 2 days ago.

So now if no one answers with a solution, that incorrect answer is going to get 100 points. Anyone who comes across it will be misled.

I imagine those who might be able to come up with a solution see there's already and answer that appears to have solved it at first glance, so they won't attempt to solve it.

Is there anything I can do in this situation? I didn't want to down vote the answer because it was a valid attempt, but I don't feel it is deserving of +5. And of course I myself can't down vote it to 1. I can't think of anything else to add to the question to improve it, and of course I don't want to add an explanation as to why that person's answer is not correct to the question itself. Would it be appropriate for me to edit their answer to show the screenshots for the second version of their project? Note they added a link in the comment but didn't update the answer.

I was planning on letting the bounty expire again if no one can figure out how to solve the problem in the next 23 hours, then perhaps start a new bounty worth even more points. If that answer does get auto-awarded, can I place a new bounty on the question and explain why the previously awarded answer is not a solution?

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    @Joey, I upvoted your comment under the answer you deem wrong. I cannot do much more. Consider stopping awarding bounties indirectly to the wrong answer, and by that I unfortunately mean stopping awarding bouties at all. Your question tallies +24 votes, it may very well be that nobody has the answer (yet). Maybe you should wait until somebody provides the revelant answer, if ever, and only then reward them with a huge bounty. – Frédéric Hamidi Jul 12 '15 at 21:21
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    (1) You can still run another bounty round, even if one got awarded already. (2) Auto-awarding is just a failsafe for people who forgot to act timely or pay for dialup. You can certainly summon a moderator to have it extinguished (no refund) if you think a bounty marker is both underserved and would prevent more correct answers. – mario Jul 12 '15 at 21:25
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    @mario: I have never heard of a moderator killing a bounty completely. Can they really do that? How is that marked in the revision history? – Deduplicator Jul 12 '15 at 21:27
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    @mario, you have to up the ante on the bounty every time though, so that's not sustainable. Also, asking moderators to extinguish bounties (I like that term) is actually pretty complex and prone to rejection. – Frédéric Hamidi Jul 12 '15 at 21:28
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    @Joey, no, don't edit that answer. Edit your question to contradict it instead. That will also give you short-lived prominence on the front page. – Frédéric Hamidi Jul 12 '15 at 22:05
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    @FrédéricHamidi Ok, I edited the question to explain why the answers are not correct, and cleaned it up a bit. Not sure what the next step is at least to avoid auto-awarding a bounty to an incorrect answer in due time. – Jordan H Jul 12 '15 at 22:20
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    @Joey, next step is to swallow up the two hundred rep that will most probably be lost, and to refrain from putting up a two hundred and fifty rep bounty afterwards. Instead, keep working on the problem and keep updating your question with more information as you make progress. With any luck, you will have an answer eventually, or solve the problem by yourself (that happens sometimes). Don't forget to self-answer then. – Frédéric Hamidi Jul 12 '15 at 22:27
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    Erm, wait, can't this just be simple? Post your own answer and award the bounty to it. If you hate it then delete it. – Hans Passant Jul 12 '15 at 22:45
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    I never minded the term, I'll gladly wear that badge. The PC phrase we need to use today is "outside of the box thinker" :) – Hans Passant Jul 12 '15 at 22:56
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    That answer isn't even an answer as it links to an external URL where the "fixed" code resides. Flagged it as NAA – Dijkgraaf Jul 13 '15 at 1:11
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    @HansPassant pretty sure that the ability to reward the bounty to your own answer was removed some years ago. – Martin Smith Jul 13 '15 at 5:43
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    Joey, for all we know your one downvote could make all the difference by the end of the grace period. If you abstain from downvoting an incorrect answer simply because it was a good-faith attempt at answering your question that means you're willing to let the bounty be automatically awarded to that answer, at least partially, for that reason. – BoltClock Jul 13 '15 at 5:44
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    The user has just updated their answer, but it's still a link-only answer without even so much as a description of what changed from the original code. The only substantial things the answerer could think of saying were "hope this helps" and, uh, "thanks". For what, the bounty? – BoltClock Jul 13 '15 at 5:54
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    Related feature request: Explicit "do not award bounty" button – animuson Jul 13 '15 at 5:59
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    @HansPassant: you cannot award a bounty to your own answer. – Martijn Pieters Jul 13 '15 at 7:10

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