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I ran across the term "semi-dup" in another thread here in SO meta. I think I understand the term intuitively, but I want to check to make sure. What does it mean?

Here's why I'm so interested. There are a lot of questions of the following ilk that pop up in SO, or in DBA.

  1. I am designing a database that needs to store data about automobiles and trucks. A lot of the attributes are the same, but some are different. Am I better off with one table or two?

  2. I am designing a database that needs to store data about students and instructors. A lot of the attributes are the same, but a few of them are different. Am I better off with one table or two?

  3. I am designing a database that needs to store data about products and services being offered for sale. A lot of the attributes are the same, but a few of them are different. Am I better off with one table or two?

etc.

(OK, OK, I've changed the wording to make the overlap more obvious, but you get the point.)

I think the term "semi-dups" describes this situation very well. And I want to start flagging them as dups, but I'm concerned that the author of the OP won't see the similarity. Unless the author gets it, it's going to be seen as a negative response, and we don't need any more of those.

(FWIW I think the designers should at least consider a three table solution, with one table for the superclass and one table for each subclass, and all three sharing the same primary key. But that's another story.)

Any way, are these semi dups?

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    Marking duplicates is mostly about they contain appropriate answers that are helpful to solve the OP's problem, not so much exact wording of the original questions. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 11 '15 at 14:04
  • If the answer is going to be substantially the same, I see no problem with marking them as dups. If the OP cannot see the similarity, they are probably not competent enough to get their stuff working anyway, (well not without sucking blood). – Martin James Jul 11 '15 at 14:05
  • I don't quite see it that way. There are thousands of highly competent programmers that have never done any database design. Database design is not complicated. But it is subtle, and it's not obvoius. A lot of these people would see the commonalities in two programming problems instantly. But they don't see past the surface when it comes to databases. This isn't stupidity. It's ignorance. And ignorance can be cured. – Walter Mitty Jul 11 '15 at 15:29
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    Mark as duplicate, and explain a bit in the comments? – NightShadeQueen Jul 11 '15 at 15:50
  • That's a good suggestion. I'll try it. – Walter Mitty Jul 11 '15 at 17:17

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