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Today I saw an article from Medium on Reddit complaining about Stack Overflow. I looked up the questions mentioned in the article and most of them were indeed closed before being answered. I've linked the questions below.

The general thrust of the article is recognizable. Close votes serve to clean up the site and make it more presentable to Google. But to those who participate in a question, a close vote feels like a rude interruption by nazi moderators.

This is especially true for new users. After all, in the real world it is unimaginably rude for a third person to step into a conversation and stop it.

Is there a way to reduce this misalignment? Perhaps closing could be more of a hint, that still allows votes, new comments, and answers, but does reduce the question's front page / search engine visibility? That way, the close votes would still accomplish their goal, while inflicting far less collateral damage.


Links here:

Post on reddit: Is Stack Overflow overrun by trolls?
Article on Medium: The decline of Stack Overflow

Asking noob questions is very much frowned upon
Question: How can I get rid of the `this` keyword in local functions?

Of those thousands of privileged users, many rule their virtual fiefdoms like the pettiest of Führers
Question: Fast database access test from .NET

This is where you’re told to go to with any complaints you may have about Stack Overflow, but the problem is possibly even worse over there.
Question: Does Stack Overflow have any way of preventing vote trolls?

I guess any question could be considered off-topic on Stack Overflow if only enough privileged trolls vote to get it closed.
Question: Angle between points?

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    Perhaps closing could be more of a hint, that still allows votes, new comments, and answers, [...]. That way, the close votes would still accomplish their goal. Erm, no, they wouldn't. The basis of closure is to prevent answers until the question is fixed. Remove that, and we may as well rename ourselves Yahoo! Answers. – Frédéric Hamidi Jul 7 '15 at 12:40
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    The butthurt is strong there... Reddit being that bastion of signal over noise... – GEOCHET Jul 7 '15 at 12:40
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    Jeez, how old is that Medium article? The "Fast database access test from .NET" was re-opened in 2009. Also, I'm mildly sad that I wasn't in any of their screenshots :( – LittleBobbyTables - Au Revoir Jul 7 '15 at 12:41
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    "in the real world it is unimaginably rude for a third person to step into a conversation and stop it" -- It is also incredibly rude to have a conversation about a topic that is not welcome or offensive to the people in front of who the conversation is being had. Having a conversation about how great Hitler's economic policies were at a holocaust survivor's funeral is likely to get a third party to stop your conversation. – GEOCHET Jul 7 '15 at 12:43
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    @GEOCHET - thanks for invoking Godwins' law. Just what we need to fight perceptions here... – Oded Jul 7 '15 at 12:44
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    @Oded, to be fair, Godwin was already invoked by the second paragraph of the questioner. – Frédéric Hamidi Jul 7 '15 at 12:49
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    @FrédéricHamidi - missed that. 0 to Godwin in NULL seconds. – Oded Jul 7 '15 at 12:49
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    "Before I could take action and modify the answer, my submission had already been modded down by several people, several of whom left snarky remarks." -- Ever notice how people who either don't know the basic lingo or purposely screw it up always make the dumbest assertions about SO? – GEOCHET Jul 7 '15 at 12:51
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    "in the real world it is unimaginably rude for a third person to step into a conversation and stop it" - 1. Putting a question on-hold doesn't stop the conversation (not that we're aiming for conversation anyway). 2. It's also unimaginably rude to walk into someone's house and take a shit on their carpet, yet people insist on wombling onto SO and dropping crap questions onto us. – jonrsharpe Jul 7 '15 at 13:05
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    Also, note that the majority of on-hold reasons explicitly tell the OP how they can fix it. – jonrsharpe Jul 7 '15 at 13:08
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    Why are there so many questions about this sort of thing today? – TZHX Jul 7 '15 at 13:16
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    @Andomar - then it's even more idiotic than I thought – LittleBobbyTables - Au Revoir Jul 7 '15 at 13:21
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    @Andomar have you actually looked at the revision histories for the questions to which you're referring? For two of them, exactly what is supposed to happen happened - the question was put on-hold, edited to meet the site standards, then reopened and answered. It's incredibly hard for me to see this as "trolling". – jonrsharpe Jul 7 '15 at 13:32
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    @Andomar - All questions linked were closed shortly after being posted. False. "Angle between points?" was closed because it had no code. "Fast database access test from .NET" was closed 11 days later, and was then re-opened by another mod. "How can I get rid of the this keyword in local functions?" was closed 5 hours later after much discussion, and re-opened a few days later. Only one was closed shortly, and that's because it wasn't a programming question. – LittleBobbyTables - Au Revoir Jul 7 '15 at 13:35
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    I've noticed that SO-critical articles come in (at least) two contradictory flavours: 1) SO is too indulgent to question askers, just giving them the answers instead of making them show some effort figure it out themselves first i.e. "giving them a fish for a day instead of teaching them to fish for a lifetime" 2) SO is too hostile to question askers i.e. "Nazi mods closed my question!" You can't please everybody, the only option is too seek a happy medium between the two extremes. That Medium article is just worthless click-bait – samgak Jul 7 '15 at 14:31
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Is there a way to reduce this misalignment?

If you can reduce the dissonance people who expect that "anything goes" get when they go to a place that has rules, sure.

in the real world it is unimaginably rude for a third person to step into a conversation and stop it

This isn't "the real world". Moderators on forums, chats, blogs and more can and do step in when things don't go their way.

I am not saying SE is perfect and that there isn't a perception that it is hostile to new comers (truthfully, we are hostile to lack of effort and badly asked questions - that a large amount of those come from new users is natural).


These views are my own and are as a Stack Exchange employee.


Side note: you really should look at that article as a badly researched collection of complaints. This person has actually picked up complaints from years ago and tried to make a cohesive whole from them. He also fails to address the small issue of how to make it better (or who anyone who has). And by it - I mean maintain quality without offending those who care not a thing about it.

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    @Andomar Remember that Stack Overflow replaced a system of discussion boards and chat rooms where you'd be verbally abused for posting a question without searching the archives first. Close votes are gentle by comparison. – Bill the Lizard Jul 7 '15 at 13:17
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    "reducing the abuse" -- Which is what close votes are doing. – GEOCHET Jul 7 '15 at 13:21
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    @Andomar Cursing someone's heritage for asking a simple question is abuse. Voting to close that question in a manner that points to the answer is not. – Bill the Lizard Jul 7 '15 at 13:22
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    I think the difference in perception is not for close votes, but for Stack's general goal. People who are happy in the community have the "repository of high value Q & As" point of view. People who are not happy see Stack as a "help website". These two views CANNOT reconcile, and honestly, about everyone who complains has the wrong mindset :S. – Patrice Jul 7 '15 at 13:28
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    @Andomar yeah, it's so horribly abusive to tell people to get their crap together and not ask an absolute garbage question that is completely unanswerable. We should rather congratulate them on being able to type something that was let through the automatic filters; even more so if they had to trick them as in "it wont let me submit because it says there's not enough non-code text so I'm writing some nonsense here" (certainly that counts as effort). That would surely make things so much better because then certainly everybody would be happy! At least if you don't care about getting answers... – l4mpi Jul 7 '15 at 13:29
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    @Andomar I recognize that there is a disconnect there, I just don't know what to do about it. When I vote to close a question as a duplicate of an older question, I see it as being actively helpful. It's hard to understand people who see it as exactly the opposite. – Bill the Lizard Jul 7 '15 at 13:38
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    @Andomar That's what we need to attack then (IMO), people's incorrect assumption that close voting is in some way "abusive". Fix that incorrect behaviour, and you go a long way to fixing the problem – Clive Jul 7 '15 at 13:42
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    If someone considers a down or close vote as abusive, they're in for really bad time in this industry, and life in general. Such people, those with paranoid tendencies, often end up in jail or beaten up in the bar car park. Disagreement votes are not abusive. In most cases, they are not even personal because the anonymous account names. I mean, seriously, it's a click on a website, not a threat against your family. Users who think that downvotes are abusive are mentally imb...., well, not worthy, and SO does not need such users. – Martin James Jul 7 '15 at 13:59
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    @Andomar but why would we continue the Q&A on a question where there's an answer somewhere? This feels to me like duplication of work for nothing. – Patrice Jul 7 '15 at 14:12
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    @Andomar I personally expect people to wipe their feet before they come into my house. And if I decide tomorrow that I want them to remove their shoes altogether, then that's how it will be. The first person who pushes past me with their shoes on, and refuses to take them off after I've told them what's what, will get a slap. Same deal here as far as I'm concerned. When you go somewhere new, you need to learn how to behave. The people who are already there already know how to. – Clive Jul 7 '15 at 14:16
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    If anyone feels that a close vote is abuse then they really need to get their heads screwed on, you are not being targeted, the close vote will literally explain why your question was closed, its people who generally don't make any effort complain not general users. – Ciaran Donoghue Jul 7 '15 at 14:17
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    @Patrice well you're about to get a metaphorical slap from Clive – Ciaran Donoghue Jul 7 '15 at 14:19
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    @Andomar you can always add another better answer to the existing question there is no stopping that, and then the conversation can continue on that answer – Ciaran Donoghue Jul 7 '15 at 14:23
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    @Andomar it is better for everyone if all of the answers to the same question end up in the same place, then you don't have to trawl around looking for the variations. I don't see how this is "interrupting the Q&A"; frankly, a bigger problem is questions not getting closed fast enough, so that people add their answers to the new one not the dupe target. "users become better programmers while doing a Q&A" - that's not actually the goal of SO, though, just a side-effect. – jonrsharpe Jul 7 '15 at 14:24
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    @Clive lol. I hope you understand I was not serious :P. But yeah, in the shoes situation, a slap would've been 100% okay. But in the stack situation, a close vote isn't... (BUT I guess it's the first time you get threathened by someone who wants to walk inside your house in shoes) – Patrice Jul 7 '15 at 14:25

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