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We have this, which is a great information, which should definitely be welcome on Stackoverflow, but for one very important fact: it is certainly a form of plagiarism.

It is, of course, appropriate to place a small quote from some other text (for example a sentence or two from the standard), if it is only a small part of the post, but here it isn't a small part.

Anticipating some objections i will say that simply crediting the source is not sufficient to make something not plagiarism. It would be easy if it were so, all the university assignments would look like:

To do this we need:
(open quotes)
(copy paste a couple of chapters from "For dummies" book)
(close quotes)
(place citation to the book)

And we can end up with many answers like this on here. Is this what we want?

The general standard for text/media is that the amount of information that you add should be not less than (and hopefully significantly greater than) the amount of information quoted.

P.S. Note that i didn't even touch the issue of it being a copyright violation (almost any court would agree, even in countries with Fair Use laws).

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  • At very least, I cleaned up the intro on that answer a bit. Plain urls all over the place, in there... Now it's at least bearable to look at. – Cerbrus Jul 7 '15 at 6:42
  • I also included all of the code blocks in the quote. – Cerbrus Jul 7 '15 at 6:45
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    I don't think it's technically plagiarism if the source is credited. From the definition in Merriam-Webster (emphasis added): "the act of using another person's words or ideas without giving credit to that person". – Reto Koradi Jul 7 '15 at 7:10
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    Yeah, it should read "What to do with copyright violation" – Pekka Jul 7 '15 at 7:33
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    @Pekka 웃: Or "What to do with answers that are wholesale copies of other sources" - I could have sworn there was a recent question on this from a month or so ago but I can't find it in the [plagiarism] tag anymore. – BoltClock Jul 7 '15 at 7:50
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    @BoltClock meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/285349/…? – Tanner Jul 7 '15 at 7:51
  • @Tanner: That one. – BoltClock Jul 7 '15 at 7:52
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    This is not plagiarism. No deceit is involved. Mislabelling this issue - and that contributor's answer - is very irresponsible. This question should be rewritten to remove the false label or withdrawn. – itsbruce Jul 7 '15 at 10:21
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    I date a TA who has dealt with plagiarism cases, failure to provide a source will get you dropped from the class (depending on the professor). Using too many sources will decrease your grade but isn't illegal... Improper maybe in an academic setting. If it gets the job done and credit is given I don't see the issue. (Falls into the lazy or smart argument). – darcher Jul 7 '15 at 10:33
  • @itsbruce It is plagiarism. It doesn't matter that you give attribution if you just copypaste more text than you wrote yourself. Try that anywhere, submit a paper to a journal where the quote is 99% of your paper and you just say "This is what another person said, it's great". – v010dya Jul 7 '15 at 10:49
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    @Volodya Passing off somebody else's work as your own is the definition of plagiarism. So if attribution is given it is not plagiarism. Simply quoting a large amount of content may be unacceptable form here and is almost certainly breach of copyright but it is not plagiarism. You are simply wrong. The author of that answer may have made a mistake but no deliberate deceit is involved and your plagiarism label is entirely unfair. – itsbruce Jul 7 '15 at 10:52
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    Is this really a copyright violation? Basically the answerer used SO as a web archive. Does the way back machine violate copyrights because it servers up copyrighted material from publicly available web pages? – NathanOliver Jul 7 '15 at 12:17
  • @itsbruce Right, and the definition of a polar bear includes it having white fur. So we paint it black and it stops being polar bear. Right? Wrong! The truth of the matter is that what you have mentioned here is nothing more than a common misconception. In a way it would be better to define it as "stealing another person's glory", and simply copypasting entire article and saying "oh, but it's not mine, it's of another person" does exactly that. – v010dya Jul 7 '15 at 13:33
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    Volodya, Hi, Yes, I'm used both answers as web archive; there is no information added by me; full text is quoted (overquoting), author is marked. Yes, the original was not licensed as open-source (CC-* license). But I think this may be useful for community to save this text. What I should to do with the answers? Should I delete them and replace with links to real web archive, only leaving short citations? Or should I convert it to community wiki to have no reputation from the upvotes? – osgx Jul 7 '15 at 15:12
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    @osgx That would be a good question to ask here on meta. Ask the community for advice, not just the person unfairly and emotively labelling you. Volodya can have his say in an answer there (amongst the answers of others) and the community will vote his answer up or down. – itsbruce Jul 8 '15 at 7:17

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