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This question already has an answer here:

I proposed the following edit: https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/8689535 and https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/8636208 which fixes wrong code (as everybody can check out with ideone

std::string s("hello world");
//std::operator<<(std::operator<<(std::cout, s),  std::endl); <- Wrong
std::operator<<(std::cout, s).operator<<(std::endl); // Edited

The reason for rejection was

This edit was intended to address the author of the post and makes no sense as an edit. It should have been written as a comment or an answer.

To me it seems that the reason is incorrect:

  1. Intended to address the author is definitly not true
  2. Makes no sense as an edit: It corrects the answer, thus it is viable
  3. Should be written as a comment: So that another one proposes the fix?
  4. Or an answer: It's too small to make a whole answer out of it...

  • Can someone tell me what the normal procedure is when you object to the rejection of an edit?
  • Can one repropose the same edit (I highly doubt it)?
  • What should I do, edit the answer again?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Community Jul 6 '15 at 21:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 5
    Edits should not change code and when an issue is noted a comment should be left so that the author can see and fix as needed. – Joe W Jul 6 '15 at 19:54
  • @JoeW, hm noted. Why shouldn't I correct an obvious bug myself? – WorldSEnder Jul 6 '15 at 19:56
  • 11
    Because it is not your answer. – GEOCHET Jul 6 '15 at 19:56
  • 1
    Changes to code would mean that everyone who reviewed the question would need to be knowledgeable enough to fully understand the code and the changes you made which is not the goal of the review queues – Joe W Jul 6 '15 at 19:57
  • "So that another one proposes the fix?" - so that the author can either adopt the change or tell you why they did it that way to begin with. – jonrsharpe Jul 6 '15 at 19:58
  • @WorldSEnder - you shouldn't correct an obvious bug in the question - you should correct it in your answer. For myself, I will reformat code in a question (e.g. - single-line 2000 character SQL statements which are...ahem...difficult to interpret :-) but I will not change the functioning of the code. Best of luck. – Bob Jarvis Nov 1 '15 at 13:34
  • Anyone know why this was rejected? It says "doesn't make it easier to read or understand", but...it does. stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/23296035 – Daniel Springer Jun 20 at 17:35
9

Your edit was rejected because it should have been a comment. The rejection reason says that.

This edit was intended to address the author of the post and makes no sense as an edit. It should have been written as a comment or an answer.

5

I rejected one of those edits, because I thought that it "...should have been written as a comment". It is generally not appropriate to change code in posts, for multiple reasons:

  1. In questions, particularly, fixing the code can solve the problem and render it redundant;
  2. The review queue is not designed for the reviewers to need domain-specific knowledge; and
  3. There may be a good reason why the author chose to write the code as they did.

If you think it should be changed, add a comment suggesting as much, and leave it to the post's author to decide whether they want to adopt it. The only exception is Community Wiki posts, which are open for edits.


Can someone tell me what the normal procedure is when you object to the rejection of an edit?

Either flag for moderator attention, or raise it here on Meta.

Can one repropose the same edit (I highly doubt it)?

You can, but...

What should I do, edit the answer again?

...no, you shouldn't. Wait for the discussion to be settled, and only propose the edit again if the consensus is that you should do so.

  • 1
    If I may put my 2 cents : the ONLY time I will accept an edit like that is if there's been a discussion with the OP in comments and he himself says "oh right, I should've done it this way"... and even then it's.... iffy – Patrice Jul 6 '15 at 20:28

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