10

From childhood, I've been using this site for discovering a lot of interesting and informative questions and answers about programming. Nevertheless, I've been actively using this site for months now and I feel addicted.

I feel addicted to reading a lot of answers here. I've simply exhausted my favorite tags by reading the most voted list. I see a new question and for answering it I spend hours of research and come into conclusion. And I've been active here since one month only.

As I'm a college undergrad, sometimes I worry what does the 'reputation' really mean for StackOverflow and the world outside it. If I go on and on contributing, answering and voting questions and answers, how can I can make a benefit out of it?

I'd love to read answers from users with years of experience and still feel love for StackOverflow.

  • 7
    If I go on and on contributing, answering and voting questions and answers, how can I can make a benefit out of it? --> StackOverflow Career – nhahtdh Jul 3 '15 at 5:42
  • 6
    "From childhood"? I find that hard to believe. Stack Overflow has only been around for shy of 7 years. You would have to be a very young teenager now at your oldest to have used the site since childhood. – BoltClock Jul 3 '15 at 11:06
  • 14
    I'm 19, I call 16 my childhood. :) – Himanshu Mishra Jul 3 '15 at 11:07
  • 3
    Opinion based question on meta? Say it ain't so! – Sobrique Jul 3 '15 at 11:53
  • 4
    What does "discussion" mean to you people? People presenting their own facts? No, facts mixed with opinions. Put on hold my foot. – Himanshu Mishra Jul 3 '15 at 11:58
  • Professional benefits of building reputation on SO (although that doesn't mention moderation or working for Stack Exchange itself, which are also options worth considering if you're really passionate about the site). – Dukeling Jul 3 '15 at 12:01
  • Embrace you inner hate - get on Lounge C++ – Martin James Jul 12 '15 at 17:43
18

Apart from the possibility of reputation perhaps helping land a job one day, and awesome swag, there aren't that many material benefits.

The undertaking of building a (hopefully, somewhat) useful resource of knowledge for the world should be fulfilling in itself to some degree. Otherwise being active on SO/SE may not be very satisfying in the long run.

While answering questions on SO teaches you a lot - there are plenty of things I know only because I did research for a SO answer! - it may not be an ideal only activity if you're in the early stages of a career and looking to shape useful professional skills.

It could be that part the time you can invest might be better spent doing something else, like working on an Open Source project or learning a new programming language.

You'll be sticking around Stack Overflow anyway because IT HAS YOU HOOKED you love it!

  • 5
    +1 for this there are plenty of things I know only because I did research for a SO answer! – Moudiz Jul 3 '15 at 11:53
11

If I go on and on contributing [...] how can I can make a benefit out of it?

You can work on your experience, which will help you in a professional way:

  • Improve your English by reading a lot and practicing writing a lot.
  • Learn to get a complete problem description out of someone by asking the right questions.
  • Work on your troubleshooting skills by mentally debugging code someone posted, and if that doesn't work, paste it in your IDE and debug it from your own machine.
  • Learn about new possibilities of libraries and frameworks, or even about new tools or languages altogether.

What does the 'reputation' really mean for [the world outside Stack Overflow]?

It doesn't have to mean much. I sometimes encounter people on the site who are recognized outside of SO, yet they have a measly three- or four-digit reputation here after years of participating. Their answers and comments are always insightful, yet hardly ever get upvoted.

5

Well, it is difficult to define "best", however, the following quote by Jeff Atwood here gives me the satisfaction about contributing to this site:

when we're learning from each other, everyone wins

  • ... unless you learn all the wrong things. Making sure people are in the best possible situation to really win in a good way is a day job for moderators and reviewers. – Gimby Jul 3 '15 at 7:39

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