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I failed an audit on "Reviewing First posts" today while reviewing this question. I did not disagree with the answer, so I was not downvoting the answer. I felt that the answer was too short and hence was going to leave a comment on the answer "to explain the answer rather than leave the end user to guess it". The automated algorithm that determined that my action to comment was wrong and promptly went ahead and disbarred me from reviewing any further questions for 7 days.

  1. I disagree with the action of the automated bot. It should not classify comments on questions with high votes as "wrong review action". An answer can always improve, or a code answer might become syntactically wrong after a new release of any language. Adding a comment is the right thing to do in such cases. Blocking reviews for the reviewer just discourages the reviewer to review any further questions.

  2. The last time I had been blocked for 7 days, it was because I had accepted an answer which was a one liner and the SO algorithm gave an explanation that "even though answers are right, they should have a brief explanation", which was correct. It seems the SO algorithm is invalidating its own directives . This is very misleading to the end users and should be fixed. It seems I have been banned now for following the exact guidelines that the SO audit sets on reviewers.

  3. How do I resolve disputes for audit failures. I see a lot of questions on Meta that ask for dispute resolutions. All of them have comments but none of them have any resolutions. Is posting on meta the right thing to do?

For people who do not have access, this was the answer which I was commenting on, in its entirety

Open terminal and use this command
/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/MacOS/Xcode </dev/null &>/dev/null &

EDIT: The below is a list of linked questions

  1. This question is an example of a scenario where the ban was overturned.
  2. This question is an example where there is a lot of conversation but no decision on whether the ban should be removed or not
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    As all automated systems (and even more so all manual ones), the audit-selection-process is far from foolproof. The problem being known as GIGO: Garbage input (voting a barely not delete-worthy answer to high heaven) results in garbage output (a bad audit selection). Due to the range of possible actions in LA / FP, it's even worse there, so SE plays it fairlyy safe by letting the algos only select audits which seem "really safe". Which just means one needs a bit worse input. As an aside, reviews (and review-audits) are public data, so unless the post is deleted, it can be seen by all. – Deduplicator Jul 2 '15 at 23:34
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    15 up votes on that answer seems fishy. I don't see how it can possibly work. – Andrew Medico Jul 3 '15 at 3:20
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    @AndrewMedico: Although it's a low quality answer by SO standard, it is actually a working answer. The command seems to originate from Apple Developer Forum: forums.developer.apple.com/thread/6653#15226 – nhahtdh Jul 3 '15 at 3:59
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    @AndrewMedico it seems that it works because of running it from the terminal, rather than the redirection itself being the answer. There do seem to be a couple of possible dupes on SO, with first from 14 June and two on 25 where same solution appears as answer. With such short questions and answers and no personal knowledge of the software involve, picking the one to link to as the non-duplicate is... tricky (for me). – Bill Woodger Jul 3 '15 at 6:38
  • @AndrewMedico , I agree with that, which is why I wanted to leave a comment on that question , rather than downvote it. I understand the audit sampling is automated so prone to intermittent errors now and then , but there should be a mechanism to address user's who are affected by the subjectiveness of the sampling – Biswajit_86 Jul 3 '15 at 17:26
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    I would flag it as VLQ. – Shaiful Islam Jul 5 '15 at 10:44
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    still under the ban :( – Biswajit_86 Jul 6 '15 at 0:32
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Blocking reviews for the reviewer just discourages the reviewer to review any further questions.

I agree with you and if you read around you will find others who feel the same way:

  • the review audit system is an insult to the intelligence (150k+ user)

  • I pretty much gave up on queue maintenance after I failed an audit and asked a question about it. It wasn't the failed audit that irritated me; rather it was the personal attack that followed. (20k+ user)

  • I quit reviewing for a day as soon as I get an audit instead of real post. (10k+ user)

  • Good reviewers shouldn't be punished for volunteering their time only to have it slapped back in their face over something that's absolutely not correct. (7k user)

  • Review banning is a meaningless penalty - I am seriously considering stopping reviewing because of the current audit system. (16k+ user)

  • I review much less than I used to myself, and the bad audits are a main reason. (25k user)

The powers that be will disagree with you and tell you that you are wrong to feel this way.


How do I resolved disputes for audit failures.

You can get your ban lifted by a diamond mod.

However, audits are run automatically by the system, so there it is tricky to find someone who will help you when you fail them. If you fail enough of them even if the audits are wrong, you will be banned.

If you are banned for failing audits, the solution is to wait out your ban, as per excerpt from this answer:

a review ban is not triggered by a single failed review, so you probably have failed other ones along the way. There is no other solution than letting the ban expire, then being more careful when reviewing, I'm afraid.

Or you can join the many many posts on Meta about review bans in the hope that a diamond will unban you. Perhaps this post will work in your case, as a diamond has been here commenting.


I am not a fan of the above, but you may read on other threads that there are very few incorrect audits in the system, and that this is not an issue that needs to be dealt with.

If you really want to do something positive after all of this, your best recourse is to downvote the related answer. Of course posting about it on Meta will also help as it raises the profile of this issue, and normally generates more downvotes due to the "meta effect".

This way, that review will be removed from the system eventually.

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    Diamond mods can manually lift certain bans, including review bans if they feel it's worth it. And for resolving disputes, If you feel that a given audit is absolutely terrible (in either direction – an objectively good post expecting a negative action or an objectively bad post expecting a positive action), simply perform the reverse action (downvote if it's bad and upvote if it's good) to prevent that from ever being an audit again. – ryanyuyu Jul 3 '15 at 14:09
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    meta.stackoverflow.com/a/288788/4320665. Well Shog is a diamond mod but also an SE employee. So I'm not sure which is required to lift a review ban. – ryanyuyu Jul 3 '15 at 14:36
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    @ryanyuyu any diamond moderator can lift/apply a review ban. And yes - in a few cases, if the person querying it has a great review history and has come across a truly unfair ban, then the lifting of that ban has happened. – Jon Clements Jul 3 '15 at 14:39
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    @Richard , thanks for a detailed explanation. It seems the prevalent mood on all review audit posts is to wait out the ban (7 days) in my case , unless I have an exceptional track record( i did not find any specifications for how exceptional is determined) or know a SE employee/diamond mod. This makes me question the efficiency of the review process. If the review process is iffy and there is no mechanism to address people affected by the iffyness, I might as well stop reviewing. – Biswajit_86 Jul 3 '15 at 17:32
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    You can add to your list ' the review audit system is an insult to the intelligence' - 150k user. – user207421 Jul 5 '15 at 2:22
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    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackstone's_formulation -> high-rep users should be given the privilege of not experiencing audits – royhowie Jul 5 '15 at 22:01
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    @roy: And you really think there's less than 10 guilty esaping for each innocent caught? Are you kidding me? And that's for single audits, not the review ban... – Deduplicator Jul 7 '15 at 0:57
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    @royhowie: The conclusion does not follow from the premise; high-rep users are only marginally more accurate in current audits, so there's no particular reason to suppose audits should stop only for them. (Also, review bans aren't really much of a punishment; they're a withdrawal of a privilege when it seems that exercise of that privilege is doing harm.) – Nathan Tuggy Jul 7 '15 at 1:41
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    @Nathan if high-rep users are failing as many audits, that suggests to me a problem with the system rather than a problem with the experts on this site. – Richard Le Mesurier Jul 7 '15 at 6:01
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    @RichardLeMesurier: Possibly. But as far as I can tell, most audits are perfectly legitimate, so the most obvious conclusion is simply that rep is not a good indicator of moderation skill and judgment. And since rep is not earned for moderating well, this is hardly surprising. – Nathan Tuggy Jul 7 '15 at 6:07
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  1. I disagree with the action of the automated bot. It should not classify comments on questions with high votes as "wrong review action". An answer can always improve, or a code answer might become syntactically wrong after a new release of any language. Adding a comment is the right thing to do in such cases.

Strongly agreed.

Blocking reviews for the reviewer just discourages the reviewer to review any further questions.

That's by design, since those who run into audit bans never failed just one audit, and are therefore considered less reliable reviewers. (Rightly or wrongly.)

  1. The last time I had been blocked for 7 days, it was because I had accepted an answer which was a one liner and the SO algorithm gave an explanation that "even though answers are right, they should have a brief explanation", which was correct. It seems the SO algorithm is invalidating its own directives. This is very misleading to the end users and should be fixed. It seems I have been banned now for following the exact guidelines that the SO audit sets on reviewers.

That's not the audit algorithm making that determination; that's a handful of LQP reviewers making that determination. The audit you failed previously I actually disagree with: while yes, answers should explain as much as possible, and I routinely leave comments accordingly, an answer that does nothing but give a correct and complete solution is definitely an answer in all respects and need not be deleted.

  1. How do I resolve disputes for audit failures. I see a lot of questions on Meta that ask for dispute resolutions. All of them have comments but none of them have any resolutions. Is posting on meta the right thing to do?

Yes, or for certain audit types (known good in particular), going and voting the opposite way can help invalidate the audit for future use. (Audits are not reused often, but not never either.)

P.S. I'm writing this from the perspective of someone who has failed dozens of audits (and posted to dispute several of them), but has not yet been review-banned. Take this with any requisite grains of salt accordingly.

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