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I know of one member who has asked thirty-two (mostly good) questions, but zero answers were accepted. Okay, not a flogging, but can we have some kind of system-administered hint (read: sanction) such as "Hey, accept some answers before you can ask more questions." It's frustrating putting in effort to questions without feedback from the OP.

Edit: Made the "frustration" part more clear.

  • I have. And he's active. Ignores comments too. – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:30
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    We had accept-rate before... it is gone... meta.stackexchange.com/questions/136951/… – rene Jul 2 '15 at 18:30
  • Oh yeah, can you tell me about that? How did it turn out? – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:31
  • @Drakes well that's the user's prerogative. I think it's not good to leave "solved" questions unaccepted, but that's entirely up to the question asker. – ryanyuyu Jul 2 '15 at 18:31
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    Is there any evidence showing that any of the answers has solved the problem for the user? They may be helpful but if they are not solving the problem fully that would be a reason to not accept them. As for the question you linked they posted a bounty on the question so it appears that the answers are not what is being looked for which means that it should not be accepted. – Joe W Jul 2 '15 at 18:33
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    Yes, he's asked a question that garnered 122 upvotes, and got an answer with 106 upvotes – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:34
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    Looking at the profile...that user seem to have a very clear idea how to use the site... – rene Jul 2 '15 at 18:35
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    An answer getting 106 upvotes does not mean that it solved the problem that the user was having just that it is a popular answer and people have found it useful. – Joe W Jul 2 '15 at 18:36
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    Yes, but there is no feedback from the user. No response to comments either – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:39
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    @Drakes If the question isn't answerable, or is of low quality, as a result of the lack of feedback on their question, then vote to close for the appropriate reason. If the question is a good and answerable question without their added responses, then there's nothing to do. – Servy Jul 2 '15 at 18:43
  • @Servy In one case, I knew of two solutions, but the OP refused to reply to any comments. So I posed both answers as different answers. Then I looked his profile and noticed his behavior. Then he set a bounty! Why doesn't he reply to comments? That is the source of this frustration you see. – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:44
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    That means your answer was not found to solve the issue. You don't get an accept check mark just because you want one. – Joe W Jul 2 '15 at 18:46
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    @Drakes it is painfully ironic that this question does in fact, NOT have an accepted answer... – David L Sep 20 '15 at 3:05
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    @DavidL I'm sorry to hear you're in pain. – Drakes Sep 20 '15 at 11:28
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    This is a highly discussed and highly debated topic. For me, it's not about the rep. It's about the respect and appreciation of the OP for the time that you have invested providing them with a viable answer/solution to their problem. With this particular user, I have to say that it is unequivocally implausible, or at a minimum extremely improbable, that out of 89 questions the OP never received even one satisfactory, useful and/or viable solution worthy of an acceptance. – Kuya Oct 26 '15 at 8:53
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It's frustrating putting in effort to questions knowing they won't be accepted.

Then don't!

When you answer on Stack Overflow, you're writing for two potential audiences: the asker, and others who might share the same problem. If you don't expect either group to appreciate the effort, then why bother unless it's personally rewarding?

If you don't enjoy the activity, if the asker seems unlikely to appreciate the results, and you don't expect anyone else to benefit... Then maybe go find something else to do? Not like there's a shortage of unanswered questions... One or two of them might actually prove interesting to answer in their own right, regardless of whether or not the asker ever responds.

  • I worded that poorly. Of course this is pleasure coding. I basically mean there is no feedback from the OP. – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:36
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    Then treat it like a puzzle-book and do it for your own enjoyment. If others eventually appreciate the results, then that's just a bonus. – Shog9 Jul 2 '15 at 18:38
  • That's true. Thanks for the advice. It's just hard to read an OP's mind and would like to solve the problem for its own satisfaction, just sometimes need the feedback or response to comments. – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:51
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No. There's nothing wrong with choosing not to accept an answer. It's his choice to accept whatever answer, if any, he wants. There is nothing at all wrong with him choosing to not accept an answer.

It's frustrating putting in effort to questions knowing they won't be accepted.

If you're not willing to provide a quality correct answer that could potentially help a lot of different people because you're less likely to get 15 reputation points, then I guess I can't stop you from not answering those questions any more than you can force a user to start accepting answers. I find it rather disappointing that you would even consider this when deciding whether or not to post an answer, as I'd like to think that posting quality content that lots of users find helpful (and indicate as much through their own votes) would be enough. But even though I find that disappointing, I still have to respect your freedom to take such matters into consideration when deciding what to answer.

  • Yes, of course. Very true. But what about never accepting an answer, ever? – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:32
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    @Drakes That's exactly the question I was answering here. I thought that I was rather explicit that it is not in fact a problem. – Servy Jul 2 '15 at 18:32
  • I worded that poorly. Of course this is pleasure coding. I basically mean there is no feedback from the OP. – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:38
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    @Drakes And they're not required to give feedback. It's nice if they do, but it's not wrong of them to choose not to, any more than it's not wrong for anyone reading the post to choose not to vote (even if they felt the post was really helpful/unhelpful). But keep in mind that the answers are still being evaluated by the entire rest of the community, and honestly in my experiences that feedback is almost always way more valuable (in aggregate) than the OP's feedback, so I don't consider it much of a loss. It's a bit more of a concern on more niche topics than more populated tags/sites. – Servy Jul 2 '15 at 18:40
  • In one case, I knew of two solutions, but the OP refused to reply to any comments. So I posed both answers as different answers. Then I looked his profile and noticed his behavior. Then he set a bounty! Why doesn't he reply to comments? That is the source of this frustration you see. – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:43
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    The bounty means that the answers you provided didn't give the solution that was needed. – Joe W Jul 2 '15 at 18:45
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    @Drakes Then you'll need to be satisfied with just getting feedback from other members of the community, or if nobody decides to give feedback, you'll have to live without it. Again, as much as feedback is nice, nobody is obligated to give it to you. – Servy Jul 2 '15 at 18:45
  • Sigh Fair enough. It's just a few aggravating members. I'll update my Chrome extension to filter their names out from the "new questions" results on the home page. Thanks everyone. – Drakes Jul 2 '15 at 18:48
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    So what's the point in accepting answers? Since every answer can be always improved in clarity and completeness, and even more important, answers can become obsolete as the software updates, answering questions is only a way to make them less attractive, whereas not accepting is an incentive to provide more up to date and complete answers. What you are implicitly stating here is that accepting is discouraged and should be avoided since the best answer always get more upvotes. – Claudio Floreani Sep 22 '15 at 21:34
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@rene answered my question in a comment. Apparently there was an accept rate system before that is now gone. Thanks for that info.

This discussion was insightful.

The answer to my own question is: don't answer questions that are excessively downvoted, or require asking more than two questions of the OP to form a solid and satisfying solution in the mind.

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    That last sentence is extremely good advice all by itself. – Shog9 Jul 2 '15 at 19:04
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    You drag me in here but I also made one other comment that I think is even more relevant. That user ONLY uses the site to ask questions, nothing else. That is not by accident. That user does very well understand how this site works. And I can only respect that and seeing the meta-effect on the reputation I can't blame that user... – rene Jul 2 '15 at 19:12
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Why did you get involved in SO in the first place? To provide answers, to ask questions or to earn reputation?

Let me rephrase that: without doing a search, do you even know who are the top 5 users with most reputation? And do you even care about who they are?

Users like amuse don't really care about any of the site's inner workings if they don't serve their purposes... They just want to get answers, no matter how unpopular their questions become (and the bounty proves this).

If they were somewhat punished for never accepting or upvoting and were restricted by that, they would likely just give up asking in this website. In this particular case, it seems his/her questions were valuable to many people already, and you never know he/she may change his/her mind about getting more involved in the future.

Forcing people to do something that does not serve the main goal of a community, is the first step to keep them away from it.

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