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From the wiki for

can either refer to "Bit-Test-And-Set" atomic instruction or "Base transceiver station" used in wireless communication

Q1. Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous?

A1. As it describes two totally different concepts, it is ambiguous

Q2. Is the concept described even on-topic for the site??

A2. Bit-Test-And-Set yes, Base transceiver station possibly, but more likely not

Q3. Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post?

A3. No

Q4. Does it mean the same thing in all common contexts?

A4. No as per A1, and TLA's rarely mean the same thing in all contexts

Should this be re-tagged?

If so what tags would be appropriate? e.g. for the Base transceiver station?

* for "Bit-Test-And-Set"?

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  • This question wouldn't fit under your proposed retagging scheme. In fact, it'd be actively harmful to retag it like that.
    – Makoto
    Jul 1, 2015 at 0:09
  • That's because I haven't proposed anything apart from re-tagging. I asked a question of which tags would be appropriate ;-) For the bit-set-test questions there might need to be a new tag, or just remove the bts
    – Dijkgraaf
    Jul 1, 2015 at 0:39
  • 3
    I don't see any harm in simply removing it from that question. We don't need a tag for every single x86 instruction (or any other architecture for that matter).
    – nobody
    Jul 1, 2015 at 2:29
  • 3
    Here I thought this would be for bug tracking systems. Jul 1, 2015 at 16:35
  • 1
    Regardless of whether simply removing the tag when it meant the x86 assembly instruction was the right thing, I don't think I approve of burninating a tag that actually has a distinguishing meaning without more than three hours' notice for comment on Meta. Jul 1, 2015 at 17:22

1 Answer 1

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For Base transceiver station the was often the appropriate one. DONE

For Bit-Test-And-Set type questions it has been removed. DONE

There was one question that was for thinking it was for BizTalk Server. Also removed. DONE

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