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This question already has an answer here:

There are a lot of answers that come through the VLQ review queue that are either code-only or "almost-code-only". Here's one that came up as an audit (which I failed):

https://stackoverflow.com/review/low-quality-posts/8540730

The answer contains a single line of code, without much explanation aside from a source link. However, given the simplicity of the question, a simple response seems reasonable.

I can see several reasons that somebody may have voted for its deletion - small amount of code, late to the party, assumed to be a link-only answer - but none of these seemed like a reason to delete it outright. What did I miss? Should simple code answers to simple code questions generally be deleted?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Jens, user4639281, Luke, Infinite Recursion Jun 23 '15 at 7:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    "What did I miss?" Missing additional explanations in the answer. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 23 '15 at 3:31
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    "Answers" that are purely code (and that link is worthless on its own) without any explanation are not good posts and shouldn't be here. I wouldn't just delete it outright (I'd leave a comment with a downvote and then vote-to-delete later if not improved), but I'm also not a diamond moderator so I have a few more options than he does. (Martijn deleted that himself.) Either way, it is most certainly not "Looks Okay". – Joe Jun 23 '15 at 3:35
  • @gnat I skip 50-60% of answers in the VLQ review queue. Most of the answers I skip are almost-code-only answers, like this one (except much more code with no explanation). I'm trying to get a handle on how those should generally be dealt with. – BJ Myers Jun 23 '15 at 4:49
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    simple, you skip unless you get to the code in familiar tag, so that you perfectly understand both question and answer and can judge with certainty whether answer is indeed okay. From there on, you proceed by picking either of okay or delete (with certainty) and don't care if it's an audit or not (because your decision is based on what you know well). Rule of thumb is, don't try to guess about code, just skip unless you are 200% certain about it – gnat Jun 23 '15 at 4:57
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    ...for the sake of completeness, there is yet another option - "dive deep, check thoroughly and cut mercilessly". This way, one can help deleting repetitive garbage and plagiarism even in unfamiliar tags / code (not to mention that it's totally "audit-safe"), but it takes much more effort than quickly clicking through queue – gnat Jun 23 '15 at 5:28