3

I understand that stackoverflow is not an appropriate location for actually asking for tips/how-to's/tutorials; the desire to avoid subjectivity is understandable and appreciated. That said, there exists a certain suite of tools that are commonly used - both by users across Stack Exchange, and by programmers/mathematicians/engineers/what-have-you's the world over - and the data on what is commonly used is objective. Often for new users, students, and those learning in general, this information is hard to find and very scattered (i.e. among Wikipedia lists, buried in infographics, closely guarded by professors, unmentioned by coworkers, etc.).

Bearing that in mind, if it's not appropriate to actually ask these kinds of questions, then:

  1. Aside from simply voting to close the question (which, while appropriate, is often unhelpful to those still seeking an answer), is there anything else that can or should be done, such as referring them to some central article or policy?
  2. Does an adequate central location exist that at least lists off commonly-used resources within a given discipline, or even better, for all of them? If yes, why are these questions not referred to it?

Note:
I'm not just asking about whether such a location exists, but also about proper etiquette for handling when users ask this and related questions - it seems very much in the spirit of "be nice" to have some sort of consistent and helpful policy in place, and unless I've not been paying attention, I don't really see that.

Also, I'm not asking where to ask such questions.

marked as duplicate by jonrsharpe, Frédéric Hamidi, πάντα ῥεῖ, Ken White, Makoto Jun 22 '15 at 22:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • "Be nice" doesn't mean "bend over backwards to give people whatever they ask for regardless"; it means "be respectful and assume good intentions". Nothing in the "be nice" writeup even implies otherwise. I can still close an off-topic question, and even downvote it, while being consistent with those ideas. – Josh Caswell Jun 23 '15 at 18:33
7
  1. Aside from simply voting to close the question (which, while appropriate, is often unhelpful to those still seeking an answer), is there anything else that can or should be done, such as referring them to some central article or policy?

We have tag-wikis, where links to such informational resources may appear. Have a look at e.g. the c++ language tag wiki that lists a number of such helpful links.

You can use these links in comments going along with close (and/or down) votes.

Anyway, the decision to consider such kind of questions off-topic was made as a diligent and conscious decision of the StackOverflow creators and community over years of experience with such stuff (You can find more detailed information about this here).

  1. Does an adequate central location exist that at least lists off commonly-used resources within a given discipline

That's commonly known as

Google search

"Note that I'm not just asking about whether such a location exists, but also about proper etiquette for handling when users ask this and related questions"

The (commonly agreed) "etiquette" is, to down (depends a bit on research efforts shown) and close vote/flag such quesitons, nothing to do with "be nice".

Nicest you can be, is to give these OP's hints/links to such resources or just the reference documentation (without mentioning "RTFM" please) in comments.

Here's a nice actual sample:

enter image description here

  • Much as I appreciated the snark in the initial answer, the edits you made make it way more helpful - for example, the commonly agreed etiquette is fairly clear to regular users (I was more or less aware of it already), but it isn't actually spelled out anywhere I've been able to find within SE, so it's nice to have it explained somewhere. – mdhansen Jun 22 '15 at 22:54
  • 4
    @mdhansen "... but it isn't actually spelled out anywhere I've been able to find within SE ..." Hmm, it's fairly well explained in section 4 of the Help Center article "What topics can I ask about here?" IMHO. New users are responsible themselves, to read the information material, how to use SO properly. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 22 '15 at 23:00
  • From the new user perspective, yeah, that's a super helpful page. It doesn't cover how users should handle when others haven't read or understood the Help Center stuff though, which is why I asked my question. – mdhansen Jun 22 '15 at 23:03
  • @mdhansen You can give them a link to that page and section in a comment at their question (and/or to that mentioned tag wikis), that's what I meant. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 22 '15 at 23:05
  • Ah, that makes more sense now. – mdhansen Jun 22 '15 at 23:06

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .