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Questions like the one below are getting more and more common on SO. Yes, we get rid of them quickly with spam flags, but it seems like there's got to be a heuristic we can use to automatically prevent their being posted, such as not allowing a new account to post a question containing the word "support" 20+ times in the text (or to just silently fail to post it). Is that feasible?

This is probably just me being silly, I know we'd be at least a couple of orders of magnitude more spam than we do if the SE team weren't already on it, but I thought I'd flag up the pattern.

Here's the full text of a representative example we just burned on SO (the title gave the phone number, as if anyone would really be stupid enough to ring it):

Outlook customer Support, Outlook customer Support, OutlookcustomerSupport, Outlook customer Support, Outlook customer Support,Outlookcustomer Support Outlook tech support,/Outlook Technical support, Canon PrinterAntivirusTechSupport, Outlook Customer Support, Outlookcontacsupport, OutlookcustomerSupport, Outlook contact supporthelpdesk,###############################################################

Outlook customer Support, Outlook customerSupport,CanonPrinterhelpdesk , Outlook antivirus help desk, Outlooktoollfree,Outlook antivirushelp,Outlook antivirus support,CanonPrinter antivirus customer support, Outlook customer care, CanonPrinterantiviruscustomercare.################################################################################## Canon Printer tech support,/Outlook Technicalsupport,CanonPrinterAntivirusTech Support, Outlook Customer Support,

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    I have Support as one of my class names. I'm posting some code and a stack trace. Where'd my question go? – TZHX Jun 10 '15 at 16:26
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    @Rizier123 I'd hellban them instead of deleting them. Let them think their posts are on the site. Deleting them would just encourage them to try to work around the spam blockers. – Bill the Lizard Jun 10 '15 at 16:27
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    Intelligent blacklisting on these has been attempted: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/258317/… and didn't quite go as expected. The group behind this regularly varies the content they post: i.stack.imgur.com/namZJ.png and uses an enormous botnet to do so. – Brad Larson Jun 10 '15 at 16:27
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    @TZHX: No filter is perfect, odds against a new user needing to do that seem vanishingly small. – T.J. Crowder Jun 10 '15 at 16:30
  • @Rizier123 And yet their spam keeps getting through. – Bill the Lizard Jun 10 '15 at 16:31
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    @BilltheLizard: So weird to see your name without the diamond. :-) – T.J. Crowder Jun 10 '15 at 16:32
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    @T.J.Crowder I know. And I think in general you have a point that this spam is pervasive (though as Brad says it's also varying). I just wanted to point out that obvious solutions are probably going to have flaws (or, with trust in skills of SO devs, they'd have been implemented) – TZHX Jun 10 '15 at 16:33
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    @T.J.Crowder - From today: stackoverflow.com/questions/30760412/… stackoverflow.com/questions/30737159/… stackoverflow.com/questions/30715478/… stackoverflow.com/questions/30715110/… . Note the variance in just those. Blocking "support" would cause them to move on to something else. They're persistent. – Brad Larson Jun 10 '15 at 16:36
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    It's taken a month, but I'm finally getting used to not having it. :) – Bill the Lizard Jun 10 '15 at 16:37
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    @BradLarson I hate those guys. – Bill the Lizard Jun 10 '15 at 16:39
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    Just tell them to tag all their "questions" with the spam tag. Then we could safely ignore/hide/whatever them. – Max Truxa Jun 11 '15 at 7:13
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    Its hardly an issue at the current rate. They stand out like a sore thumb and so get downvoted to oblivion within seconds. – kaybee99 Jun 11 '15 at 10:08
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    "as if anyone would really be stupid enough to ring it". Why do you think they keep doing it? There are people out there who are that stupid. – ivarni Jun 11 '15 at 12:29
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    @ivarni: I was rounding off the extremely small fractional percentage just ever so slightly north of zero. And I was wondering whether this particular spamming was actually useful, or just part of a multi-pronged attack they haven't figured out isn't pulling its weight. – T.J. Crowder Jun 11 '15 at 13:48
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    @T.J.Crowder No joke, my mind inserted a diamond into his name the same way it works out jumbled words. "Hrm, SE must've misspelled Bill the Lizard again. That's easy to fix..." To the topic, seems the spam nut has been at least partially cracked before. Not sure what would be that unique to SE/SO that leveraging/tweaking existing filters wouldn't work. At worst, show the "prove you're not a robot" page and/or run filtered question to a new type of review stack before posting. – ruffin Jun 12 '15 at 17:37
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As a first step you could require users creating a new post (either question or answer) with less than n reputation to enter a captcha (or pass some other "Prove you're a human" test) before being permitted to submit the post (for some reasonably small value of n but not too small).

As a next step, perform a statistical analysis on the post to count word occurrences for users with less than m reputation (where m may or may not be equal to n above). This can be compared to historic patterns of both spam and legitimate questions and answers. If the submission falls too far outside the patterns normally associated with legitimate posts, then have the user respond to a captcha before permitting the post.

This should at least cut down on the spam making human handling a more manageable task.

1

A maybe-obvious-maybe-not solution from someone with fresh eyes but no experience in security:

Encourage more people who are just looking at responses to become members. And require a 1~2 day window between signing up and posting a question. I was browsing heavily for months before I created an account, and only did so once I had a question I simply could not find. And then, if someone posts spam like this, there's a special category for reporting it. I'm not sure how the best method of banning would go. Maybe ban their IP for a day and their account for a week for the first offense and ban their account forever for the second offense. I don't know how bans and deleted accounts work here. If a certain username gets completely deleted, can someone else claim it? If not, banning these bots could be worse than letting them be, because all the usernames would be taken up very quickly...

But I also like the idea of silently blocking the spam. It's possibly more complicated than it seems. If there's a whole lot of accounts from one spambot, they could easily see that their spam is getting blocked. Instead, let everyone with the spam flag on their account see all the spam, but no one without the spam flag can see it. Usually that would be used for like an exclusive club, but in this case it's used in reverse.

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    There is a banner which encourages viewers to join up. The suggestion of a waiting period before posting has been discussed up and down and the general consensus has been that it would not affect bots (who don't care how long they have to wait) and it would turn away real users with real questions who don't have two days to wait to ask their question. There are already many methods (both systematic and organic) in place which take care of spam accounts/posts, and the vast majority of spam does not see the light of day. There are always false negatives, that is what this is about. – Tiny Giant Jun 13 '15 at 5:02

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