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I recently read Nick Craver's article on what it takes to run Stack Overflow, and I have a few questions regarding the article.

Nick Craver:

"Here are some quick numbers from a 24 hour window few days ago - November 12th, 2013 to be exact."

148,084,883 HTTP requests to our load balancer

^---Is this the number of times the website is visited overall in a day?
That means there's literally 148 million visits to the site in a day?

36,095,312 of those were page loads  

^---If 36 millions were page loads, then what's the leftover 112 million for, and what's the difference?

 833,992,982,627 bytes (776 GB) of HTTP traffic sent
 286,574,644,032 bytes (267 GB) total received

^---What's the difference between sent traffic and received traffic?

1,125,992,557,312 bytes (1,048 GB) total sent  

^---1,048 GB of what sent?
I thought it was referring to the total of the 776 GB of sent traffic and 267 GB of received traffic, but that's actually 1,043 GB, not 1,048 GB.

334,572,103 SQL Queries (from HTTP requests alone)  

^--- Is that the number of executed SQL queries?

412,865,051 Redis hits
3,603,418 Tag Engine requests
558,224,585 ms (155 hours) spent running SQL queries
99,346,916 ms (27 hours) spent on redis hits
132,384,059 ms (36 hours) spent on Tag Engine requests
2,728,177,045 ms (757 hours) spent processing in ASP.Net

^---I don't understand the rest of these, but I don't think it's too important, so if anyone knows and can answer any of the other questions above, please do.

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    November 2013 was quite a long time ago. I imagine a lot of these numbers have changed dramatically. Overall HTTP requests may even have gone down since moving to an outsourced CDN. – TZHX Jun 5 '15 at 14:18
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^---Is this the number of times the website is visited overall in a day? That means there's literally 148 million visits to the site in a day?

No, that's the total amount of requests. Take into account that a single page normally performs many requests (css files, js files, images, etc)

^---If 36 millions were page loads, then what's the leftover 112 million for, and what's the difference?

36 million of pages requests, and those page requests generated a total of 148 million requests

^---What's the difference between sent traffic and received traffic?

When you request a page to the server (or any other resource), that's received traffic for them. When they send the page (or any other resource) that's sent traffic.

^---1,048 GB of what sent? I thought it was referring to the total of the 776 GB of sent traffic and 267 GB of received traffic, but that's actually 1,043 GB, not 1,048 GB.

Not 100% sure about this but 1048 GB seems to be talking about HTTP + other protocols.

^--- Is that the number of executed SQL queries?

Yes

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  • The 1,048 GB of sent traffic. Is that how many GB of bandwidth that they're using up? – iscattered Jun 5 '15 at 0:52
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    "css files, js files, images, etc": Well, all those static files can be cached, and most aren't on the SE servers, but on the CDN/imgur/google/etc... – Deduplicator Jun 5 '15 at 1:33
  • @Deduplicator: it was just an example of why a (general) page involves several requests. – Claudio Redi Jun 5 '15 at 1:37
  • @ClaudioRedi I think you missed one of my question. The 1,048 GB of sent traffic. Is that how many GB of bandwidth that they're using up? If not, where does it say how many GB of bandwidth that they're using up? – iscattered Jun 5 '15 at 2:00
  • @iscattered: it could be seen as bandwidth consumed over a day but it would probably be an overuse of bandwidth concept. Just see it as GB sent in every concept, period. Don't add any label. If you download a file with size of 10 GB you don't say that consumed 10 GB of the bandwidth, you just say that downloaded 10 GB. – Claudio Redi Jun 5 '15 at 3:12

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