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With reference to one of the discussions on different meaning of votes on meta - the thought in the title of this question came to mind.

Simply put - let there be a question, be it a regular or a feature request, that ends up with a (possibly very) negative score due to much disagreement (but not post quality!). Should its poster delete it due to a lack of public interest? Or should it be kept for posterity and future reference (to remind that such ideas are frowned upon)?

I'm assuming that the answer to the above is that it's desirable for the site to keep all sorts of questions (even controversial and poorly-received ones) so that future questions on similar topics are avoided. However, it bothers me that keeping such questions is mostly discouraged (even on the most basic level of Badges, which are tied to positive score, and are even awarded on the deletion of high and low scoring posts).

Below are my 2 questions:

  1. Egoistically speaking, negative score might make me feel uncomfortable, so what's to stop me from deleting a post, even if it's valuable to the site?
  2. Why is deleting both positive- and negative-scoring posts encouraged (via the mechanism of Badges), specifically on meta?
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  • To clarify: downvotes on Meta contributions won't cost you points. – Pekka Jun 1 '15 at 17:45
  • @Pekka웃 - hence I wrote "make me feel uncomfortable" (i.e. not a strictly quantifiable parameter like costing me arbitrary internet points)... – Dev-iL Jun 1 '15 at 17:47
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what's to stop me from deleting a post, even if it's valuable to the site?

Nothing, as long as it meets the criteria for self-deletion (see e.g. How does deleting work? What can cause a post to be deleted, and what does that actually mean? What are the criteria for deletion?) But it may get undeleted by other users if they disagree that it should be gone.

Why is deleting both positive- and negative-scoring posts encouraged (via the mechanism of Badges), specifically on meta?

I don't know, but they're bronze badges you can only get once each, so it's hardly a major incentive.

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