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Dyslexic coders are already at a disadvantage, seeing things that are not actually there in the code, or reading the code in ways that make it at first sight mean something other than what it means.

Then we find Stack Overflow, and we post our questions, and are treated to assaulting responses. Then we eventually realize, yeah, sure, if you've been doing this forever and you're not learning it for the first time, and you're not dyslexic, maybe it was a dumb question. But no question is dumb that you don't know the answer to.

Dyslexia is a different way of seeing things. It's also a real disability. People who are dyslexic are prone at times to posting what might be perceived by others as dumb questions. Would you downvote someone for having a disability you could see, that was the cause of what you thought was a dumb post?

Many designers and art directors are dyslexic to some degree, but would you create an environment where they were not welcome to ask questions in their own way?

I wonder what kind of features could be developed that would assist in this situation and assist posters with dyslexia in getting their questions answered in a kind way? Someone below in the comments suggested a [dyslexic] tag - I think that's a great idea!

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    No! Simple dyslexic failures would be edited out quickly, if the question is valid in itself. We're not such morons. Well, wording like plz, u and such alike isn't dyslexia, but laziness and disrespect. (My daughter's a highly intelligent dyslexic, I well know what I'm talking about). – πάντα ῥεῖ May 25 '15 at 21:05
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    To be a successful programmer you have to be pedantic since compilers are non-forgiving. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 25 '15 at 21:11
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    The example questions you linked don't appear to have anything at all to do with dyslexia. They're both fundamental misunderstandings. No offense, but your complaints appear to be caused by a complete lack of familiarity with how Stack Overflow works, and oversensitivity to receiving even a single downvote in the case of the second question. – Chris Hayes May 25 '15 at 21:26
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    "that's like saying nations that accommodate wheelchairs should rip up the ramps!" -- it's nothing of the kind, and please don't throw Straw Man Fallacies on us. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 25 '15 at 21:26
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    Voting for any other purpose than the quality of the post is a misuse of the voting system. We don't vote on people. We vote on content. Dyslexia plays zero part in voting, and should absolutely stay that way. – fbueckert May 25 '15 at 21:26
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    We can't accommodate every single question that comes from somebody misunderstanding something. Can you not see how that doesn't scale at all? Yes, you have dyslexia and that sucks, but that doesn't mean you have the right to ask any question you want here and expect a good reception. – Chris Hayes May 25 '15 at 21:30
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    @AgentZebra The entire voting system is predicated on that simple premise: Vote on the content. That's it, that's all. What you're suggesting is a massive shift of the current system, and encourages a user-first mentality. That's going to kill SO as we know it. So, no. It's not discriminatory in the least. If anything, it's utterly indiscriminate. Nobody gets special treatment. Everything is just on it's own merits. And that's what attracts, and keeps, the people the site is built around: the experts. – fbueckert May 25 '15 at 21:33
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    How the fsck is voting without consideration of the person "discriminatory"? That is an absolute perversion of the word. – jscs May 25 '15 at 21:34
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    Nice strawman there. The point is, you're using dyslexia as an excuse. We vote on content, and I absolutely disagree we should change it. – fbueckert May 25 '15 at 21:37
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    @AgentZebra The strawman is how you're using the ramps and stairs. On this site, 100% of the time we don't care who's posting, and we only judge content. In your example, less than 100% of the world has ramps + stairs (Therefore not equivalent). The proper analogy is to point out that while other sites may provide "special help" as per your requirements, this site doesn't, just like how some buildings do provide ramps, and some don't. That's just the nature of this site, however, and is one of the main reasons why it's so successful. It's a content based system. – Aify May 25 '15 at 21:44
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    @AgentZebra I'm biased as explained. I well accord dyslexia to be accepted as a deficiency, but I don't accept it to excuse laziness. One has to overcome their deficiencies, that's the lesson to be learned (by everyone). – πάντα ῥεῖ May 25 '15 at 22:11
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    "Dyslexic coders are already at a disadvantage" - that is certainly the case, and they have my sympathy! But we're trying to build a repository of knowledge and a thousand "you've misspelled this" or "those lines are the wrong way around" answers are too localised for this model. "I wonder what kind of features could be developed" - get a decent IDE, for a start; they can tell you when things are misspelled or (particularly in statically-typed languages) you're calling the wrong thing. – jonrsharpe May 25 '15 at 22:23
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    At this point, it's clear the asker has no intention of this being a good faith question, but is using it for trolling. It's time to flag and walk away. – fbueckert May 25 '15 at 22:29
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    @AgentZebra no one is trying to ban dyslexics, you're putting it in everyones mouths. Also you simply can't expect us to accommodate every single disability on the world there are too many. Judging the content alone is completely fair and there are already enough people who deal with it perfectly fine without whining. I have to take my medication, others have to use programs to help them, you have to learn too and not be too lazy, judging on content alone doesn't discriminate. – user1942027 May 25 '15 at 22:30
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    Just as your compiler or IDE cannot take into account your condition, neither should SO. You need to deal with the facts on the ground, as they are, not how you wish them to be. – Ňɏssa Pøngjǣrdenlarp May 25 '15 at 22:51
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I find this whole topic ridiculous, and frankly a little offensive.

A great many people on the network have "disabilities", or better put aren't exactly neurotypical, and we (or at least I) don't expect and wouldn't appreciate being treated differently because of that.

Having looked at your posts, dyslexia doesn't seem to be the reason that they aren't well received...

Your heavily downvoted posts come across as conversational, too broad, and not well researched. Further you tend to complain bitterly when ever you receive a downvote which tends to attract more downvotes.


Sorry to come down on you so hard, but many have to fight hard to overcome the stigma of their condition. Having someone come out and say "I have condition X, so the rules shouldn't apply to me..." is really frustrating to people who don't want that sort of perception/attention.

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  • First people have to fight others ignorance of their condition, before they can fight the stigma. What your really saying is 'shut up already'. Dyslexia is often about the way people process and order information. – Agent Zebra May 25 '15 at 21:54
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    Having looked at your posts, dyslexia doesn't seem to be the reason that they aren't well received +1 – Ňɏssa Pøngjǣrdenlarp May 25 '15 at 21:56
  • Josh Caswell :) I think apaul34208 was the first to put words into someones mouth. But anyway, it does seem like you also want to bully me into shutting up instead of addressing the issue presented. – Agent Zebra May 25 '15 at 21:58
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    @AgentZebra I don't expect others to accommodate me, so they usually don't need to be aware of my condition. – apaul May 25 '15 at 22:01
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    @AgentZebra No, I think you're misunderstanding what is being said. The point is, here at SO, having a disability is irrelevant for participation. What you're advocating is essentially, "I have a disability, so users should be more lenient towards me", and you're being called on that. You're not unique in that fact. But where others are trying to overcome that, you're falling back on it to use as an excuse for not meeting the standards SO expects. – fbueckert May 25 '15 at 22:02
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    Yeah, my response to your post is obviously an attempt to stifle your expression, @AgentZebra. You're too late for the "bullying" conversation: we already talked about that today. If I had wanted to "shut you up", I would have voted to close and delete this question, not answered it. – jscs May 25 '15 at 22:02
  • @AgentZebra Having a different perspective on the world can become an asset if you develop it. Having a "different way of seeing things" can become your greatest strength or your disability, depending on how you view it and work with it. – apaul May 25 '15 at 22:14
  • @AgentZebra continuing down your current path could lead to a suspension, you may want to take a break for a few minutes and calm down. Also please make note of the comment above. – apaul May 25 '15 at 22:36
  • @apaul34208 feel free, if you feel the need to censor a serious, legitimate discussion. – Agent Zebra May 25 '15 at 22:38
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    @AgentZebra and if I see one, I'll be sure not to censor it. – jonrsharpe May 25 '15 at 22:40
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    @jonrsharpe I think everyone has been heard, there's nothing to be gained from continuing this much further. – apaul May 25 '15 at 22:41
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    @apaul34208: I'll up that even. Since this discussion has degenerated into a rant, and has been closed, I suggest that delete it as it will serve no benefit for future viewers. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 25 '15 at 23:06
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    @apaul34208: did you go through the OP's stackoverflow questions, the ones he linked to? Please do that, go through the edits to the question to see his level of hostility. I think that the hostility he's receiving is a direct reflection of that which he is giving out. I'd post the deleted text of his here, but I've been raised to never use such language in public discussion. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 25 '15 at 23:12
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    @HovercraftFullOfEels: I agree with apaul here; unnecessary comments and the question itself can be cleaned up when a mod arrives, but I think there's a skeleton of a real thing that was addressed by the answers. – jscs May 25 '15 at 23:30
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    @AgentZebra I m dyslexic, and have spent much of the last year in wheelchairs and calipers - I would be horrified to be treated differently from everyone else... also, anyone could use the tag, how would anyone verify the correct use? – user4756884 May 26 '15 at 8:31
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If you're someone who has trouble reading or understanding written material, then I'm afraid that's something you have to take into account when doing your research before you post your question. You may have to work harder to understand what you're asking about than another person; that sucks, granted.

If your difficulty with written language manifests itself as simple grammatical or spelling hiccups in your post, someone will come along very quickly and fix it up. You're extremely unlikely to get downvotes just for that.

If you're unable to make an understandable post because you have a hard time writing, there's awfully little that strangers over a wire can do to help in this format. Hopefully you can enlist a friend to assist you in person with the posting process.

If you're using your unfortunate natural disadvantage as an excuse to bypass the site's quality expectations, you're in for downvotes, just like anyone else who ignores them.

I won't even get into the issue of "newbies" here; it's been done to death.

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    Aside: the [dyslexic] tag would be a meta-tag which we eschew. – jscs May 25 '15 at 21:33
  • – Josh Caswell You can eschew all you like, but maybe it's time to bring the meta-tag back :D Besides, as I wrote above, dyslexia is not always about spelling, it's often about the way people order information and see a particular issue. – Agent Zebra May 25 '15 at 21:38
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    @AgentZebra Do you intend to actually address any arguments, or just keep stomping your feet and claiming you deserve this tag? You've come to a community you hardly understand and are demanding change. It would benefit you a great deal more to understand the ideals that Stack Overflow is built on and why it is so. You can hardly mount an effective argument from a position of ignorance. – Chris Hayes May 25 '15 at 21:39
  • :) I am addressing a serious issue. But I get it, you don't like change, or uppity newbies trying to make Stack Overflow work for them. – Agent Zebra May 25 '15 at 21:41
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    @AgentZebra Or, perhaps, we insist users understand why things are the way they are, so they can make informed arguments why things should change. We are receptive to change, when an argument is presented that shows a level of effort and understanding. What you're doing here is exactly what Chris has characterized it as: stomping your feet and demanding change. That's never going to make it happen. – fbueckert May 25 '15 at 21:43
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    I'm clear on the fact that dyslexia doesn't just mean accidentally swapping letters around, @AgentZebra; my answer specifically leads with "trouble reading or understanding written material". – jscs May 25 '15 at 21:51
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    @AgentZebra Being dyslexia myself i well understand your obvious frusration at the aittiude off some off the grammer fascists you have encountered. The effects of dyslexia are very suttile and not very obvious to everybody else. Correcting grammer and spelling mistakes can be very offensive to some people. understanding that due to the way that a dyslexia mind works the phrasing off a question might be presently slighly different to a normal question and people should not be downmarked for it. – Dave Jun 3 '17 at 15:16

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