-15

This question already has an answer here:

Is there a level at which a user who was not the asker of a question can change the accepted answer for a question? In most cases the asker will know what fixed their problem, but some are more fact-based and you can sometimes see a consensus growing that the accepted answer is not the best (e.g. a different answer gets way more votes than the accepted). It seems like if such a consensus becomes evident, an expert user should have the privileges to change the accepted answer to account for those cases when a user accepted an answer too quickly.

marked as duplicate by Louis, Infinite Recursion, Unihedron, James A Mohler, HaveNoDisplayName May 20 '15 at 13:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 4
    I hope not. Though I have occasionally seen ample reason for wanting that pivilege, I don't think anyone should have it. – Martin James May 20 '15 at 12:58
  • 1
    It can be abused by them (great power comes with great responsibility, but still). OTOH, the number of upvotes doesn't make the answer more correct (happened sometimes) – Andrew T. May 20 '15 at 13:17
  • The very point of having votes is to weed out good and bad content. If something gets a disproportional number of positive votes, it wins! That is what determines correctness on StackExchange, distributed opinion. You guys are surprisingly opposed to this notion. – adamconkey May 20 '15 at 13:33
  • 2
    the key is [the OP] will know what fixed their problem. So they get to award the accepted bonus. Other answers may resolve the problem for a wider range of users, so they are rewarded with UpVotes, which in some regards are more valuable than the +15 acceptance points – Nat Pongjardenlarp May 20 '15 at 13:46
  • Then the ordering should at least be different. Put the highest voted answer first, followed by the accepted, followed by descending order of high votes. Readers should get the best info first and not waste time on potentially lousy answers. – adamconkey May 20 '15 at 13:50
  • Isn't there a post on here on why the accepted answers isn't necessarily the best? I can't find it but I think the OP should read it – NathanOliver May 20 '15 at 13:51
  • 2
    readers should have the good sense to read all the answers, even any DV'd ones, and decide for themselves which parts of which answers to implement. Blindly reading only the accepted answer is just a form of cargo cult programming. – Nat Pongjardenlarp May 20 '15 at 13:55
5

Alright... I thought I'd pass on this one but when I saw this comment from the OP:

The very point of having votes is to weed out good and bad content. If something gets a disproportional number of positive votes, it wins! That is what determines correctness on StackExchange, distributed opinion. You guys are surprisingly opposed to this notion.

That's surprising only for someone confused about what the acceptance mark means. Here's a refresher, from the page that explains what the acceptance mark means:

Accepting an answer is not meant to be a definitive and final statement indicating that the question has now been answered perfectly. It simply means that the author received an answer that worked for him or her personally, but not every user comes back to accept an answer, and of those who do, they may not change the accepted answer if a newer, better answer comes along later.

So Alice asks a question and Bob answers in a way that Alice found helpful (and hopefully, correct). So she accepts Bob's answer. Then Charlie comes a year later and posts a better answer. Now, the problem is no longer current for Alice so she does not evaluate Charlie's answer, but it still gathers upvotes from other people. Arguably, Charlie's answer is just better. No dispute. However, by what rationale can anyone claim that Charlie's answer "worked for [the OP] personally"?

  • Fair enough, point taken. I would prefer to see highest voted answer shown first, followed by accepted. – adamconkey May 20 '15 at 14:05
  • 1
    More people are favorable to the notion of arranging the order of the answers as you suggest (me included, actually) than to the notion of giving someone else than the OP the ability to set the accepted answer. I don't recommend putting in a feature request for changing the order though because it's been asked multiple times already. – Louis May 20 '15 at 14:07
5

Only the person who asked the question can accept or change an accepted answer outside of a case where there is a bug and a stack exchange employee can change the data in the database to change the status of an answer. It would most likely happen in the case of a bug such as in the case of two accepted answers.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .