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This question already has an answer here:

Very important thing to build improved world of engineers.

I am here in Stack Overflow since many years. I love it because of amazing knowledge and very supporting community.

But now think, are we actually using this community and knowledge for new challenges OR only to write code for us?

In mostly problems, questioner don't like to think minor solutions. Any problem in their day-to-day work, they just pasting their whole code and wait for while to have ready-made function to solve their issues.

They don't like to R&D, debug, or make efforts to write code themselves.

I think it's time that we should think about this and don't write code function for them who don't like to do theme self. Just give them hints.

Any questions that make you feel, it's very easy task, asker can easily manage with some hints then give hints.

Let juniors to think for small issues, Let them to grow their knowledge by debugging, hair snatching, sweating.

Are you with me?

I want to spread this message to other groups and let's build smart engineers.


I had small example for you what I actually mean, https://stackoverflow.com/questions/30230250/query-in-cactivedataprovider Here, Questioner has asked question to convert his query to Yii technology format.

marked as duplicate by Louis, HaveNoDisplayName, ProgramFOX, Community May 14 '15 at 16:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

migrated from stackoverflow.com May 14 '15 at 7:44

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

  • 4
    This would probably be slightly more on-topic on Meta, but even there it is just a matter of opinion. I'd say broadly no, it is not making lazy engineers - Stack Overflow is an effective force against help vampirism, and is making people less lazy. – halfer May 14 '15 at 7:43
  • halfer, Added example for you :) – Sanjay Mohnani May 14 '15 at 7:50
  • Yes, and rolled back all my edits. Please watch out for the "post edited" message when you are editing, and cancel your amendments if you see it (you can copy your changes to clipboard and reapply them). I've rolled back and reapplied your addendum. – halfer May 14 '15 at 7:51
  • In relation to your example, I agree a demonstration of effort is a good idea, and you may comment to that effect if you wish. I frequently do. If in your view a lazy question is worth downvoting, you may do so. – halfer May 14 '15 at 7:53
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    then why did u ask many questions/helps from SO, is it advice applicable only for others? not for u...? – user1844933 May 14 '15 at 7:56
  • Yes, I can down vote, but it will break their moral. I want experts to give them hints to improve their knowledge by making their hands dirty in code. Experts should give Notes, not whole Codes. What you say ? – Sanjay Mohnani May 14 '15 at 7:56
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    Related question: meta.stackoverflow.com/q/293931/472495 - should bad questions be answered? Also possible duplicate: meta.stackoverflow.com/q/251336/472495. – halfer May 14 '15 at 7:56
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    Well, opinions differ as to how much help to give. I am in the "give hints" camp, and comment much more than I answer. Other people - even high rep users - prefer to give answers, even if the asker could have done more research themselves. It is possible that downvotes can be off-putting to some users, but that's the risk they take for asking lazy questions. – halfer May 14 '15 at 7:59
  • Yes You are helping and I appreciate. If other people stop to think for small problems then how they become experts. I just argue for not giving ready copy/paste code. Give them hints by giving Urls, Material etc... Simple. Nothing to argue on it. – Sanjay Mohnani May 14 '15 at 8:02
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    Let people who ask lazy questions, and those who answer them, do their thing. They will eventually realize, one way or the other, that the joke's on them. (Of course, that doesn't mean we shouldn't downvote and closevote such questions when we see them, and hold those who answer them in low regard.) – Pekka 웃 May 14 '15 at 8:43
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    I read your title and my immediate response is... you can't blame Stack Overflow for people's laziness. Unfortunately, much of our world has becoming one of instant gratification. There are plenty of people who will fill that desire by answering lazy questions that haven't been researched, etc. You can't blame SO for this. – Taryn May 14 '15 at 12:08
  • Sorry for wrong title, Not blaming SO directly, but blaming those experts who give ready copy paste answers. Looks like my wrong title is killing my question. Just edited Title. – Sanjay Mohnani May 14 '15 at 13:00
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    Guys, If anyone agree with my NEW title, PLEASE reopen this debate. Thanks. – Sanjay Mohnani May 14 '15 at 14:04
  • @Sanjay: I've already explained this would be (more) on-topic on Meta. It will not be re-opened here, since it is not a programming question. – halfer May 18 '15 at 21:46
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Yes, StackOverflow attracts more than its share of Help Vampires, because it has such a reputation as the source for answers to problems... but don't forget that it isn't simply the person asking the question that you're helping with an answer, it's anybody searching for that answer in years to come.

Some questions, those where the problem is simply a typo, get closed pretty quickly and don't clog up the system.

Questions where a good answer is provided have value, even though the original question may have been raised by somebody that simply wanted a copy/paste solution.

Good answers don't easily go out-of-date. An answer that provides not only a solution (or even several solutions) should also provide an explanation of how/why it is the solution, relevant documentation links, etc; and is an answer for posterity. The Help Vampire may come and go, but others with similar problems will follow and some of them will be inspired to understand the answer and learn from it rather than just copy/paste it.

In providing a thorough answer even for the Help Vampires, we're also providing a thorough answer for those others that are Googling/Researching the same problem.

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    Yes, Don't give them exact answer. Give them research Urls. Agree with Mark.. – Sanjay Mohnani May 14 '15 at 8:04
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    Sadly there will always be some people which asks a question and just want us to do their job and write code from them, so that they can copy&use it. And you can't do anything against this! Because there will always be a vampire which will just post a "code only answer". So the asker will ignore all hints and tips, he will just wait until he gets is code and then he's out of here. – Rizier123 May 14 '15 at 8:23
  • @Rizier123: a correction on your terminology: those asking (more typically, requiring or demanding) code are vampires. Those answering with code only without any explanation at all are called "repwhores". (Look at the difference with the accepted answer in that example.) – usr2564301 May 14 '15 at 10:39
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    @Jongware You mean: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/252077 camp 3 :) – Rizier123 May 14 '15 at 10:43
  • Guys, If anyone agree with my NEW title, PLEASE reopen this debate. Thanks. – Sanjay Mohnani May 14 '15 at 14:04
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No. Those with the right mind set are on Stack Overflow answering questions, and it's making them better at what they do. I learn a lot from a steady stream of questions and trying to figure out solutions.

Help Vampires exist - always have, always will. A reasonable fraction of IT these days can be done via Googling the answer. That's not a bad thing though - it simply means the corpus of reference material is growing steadily, and those of us professionally specialised have less 'boring' stuff to pick up. Easy stuff is already well known and solved.

That leaves me with some really fascinating complex problems to investigate and troubleshoot, and it is this that keeps me doing 'IT Engineering'. I'm not a programmer by trade, I'm an Infrastructure Engineer - so I do 'draw from' Stack Overflow, Server Fault, Unix & Linux and a couple of others. It keeps me sharp, because I see considerably more interesting problems than I would in my day job.

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