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I've seen a lot of "how to flag / handle" questions on the meta (like this one), but none directly asking or answering what I want to know.

Many questions follow the structures:

I have X, how do I Y?

I have X, but it doesn't work.

(with Y related to X). Some recent examples (that by no means cover all bases) are:

These types of questions either

  • Do not show code at all.
  • Show code that we can't compile (let alone run and actually see the problem).
  • Show so much code (code dump) that it's too difficult to pinpoint the problem.
  • Do not provide inputs and expected outputs as part of the code.

I would no blatantly say that they do not show effort (although it comes hand-in-hand many times), but my problem is the inability to answer rather than the asker's laziness \ stupidity ;)

When flagging for the above issues, there are some gray areas for me as to what the intended use of the flag is:

too broad

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.

While the questions are many times very specific, there indeed are "too many possible answer". The first question in my list of examples ask a specific question, but because the lack of code there are too many possible answers.

unclear what you're asking

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.

While the question can be phrased clearly, it is many times not clear how to answer. Questions about a problem in the code that do not provide the type of code needed to answer lack the details and are thus unclear in some way.

off-topic because...

This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.

Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example.

This last paragraph seems to touch on many of the points I want to flag for: "desired behavior", "shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself" and a link to the MCVE page. My problem is that they are not "off-topic", they can ask a concrete on-topic question about code.

For all MCVE-related issues above, I would like to know if I should use one of those flags, if it does not matter which one I use, or if I should use all of them when appropriate, and if so, when is it appropriate for each?

I usually choose "unclear what you're asking" and it works, but I want to be on the safe side and understand better the flags.

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The correct one to use in these situations is normally the

-> off topic

-> Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example.

Do not provide inputs and expected outputs as part of the code.

That is taken care of with the part about "must include desired behavior"

Show so much code (code dump) that it's too difficult to pinpoint the problem.

That is taken care of with the part about "How to create a Minimal, Complete and Verifiable example". As well, as the part about "and the shortest code necessary"

Show code that we can't compile (let alone run and actually see the problem).

That is taken care of with the "How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example, and with the "reproduce it in the question itself"

Do not show code at all.

This is taken care of with the "must include ... the shortest code necessary ... in the question itself"

The only one of those reasons (in quote blocks) that you mentioned, that I'd use the plain old "unclear what your asking" close reason, is sometimes when they provide no code what so ever. The others are normally very clear that they should be closed with the MCVE off-topic reason.

Since you have less than 3k, your flags to close the question really just send the question to the close queue where > 3k users review them and decide to leave them open or vote to close them. So while you should definitely try to choose the best of the like 11 different close reasons there are, you don't need to sweat it too much if you choose an incorrect one, since it'll likely just do the same thing by sending it to the close queue for review.

There's also a lot of situations where a question fits multiple close reasons, in those cases just try to pick the one that you think fits it best or just do the first that came to mind when you read the question.

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    I agree with this answer 100%. However, I will point out that there are those who read "questions seeking debugging help", and feel that phrasing means that that close reason is inappropriate unless the question is explicitly in the form of "I wrote this code, it has a bug, please help me find it". Personally, I feel that some reasonable code example is almost always required, even if the question is "how do I add feature X to my code?", and I will use that close reason if an MCVE isn't present. But I agree the precise wording doesn't clearly fit with that approach. – Peter Duniho May 9 '15 at 22:50
  • @PeterDuniho The precise wording isn't clear for more than just the flag mentioned in the answer, which is what prompted my question. It seems to me like the whole categorization of the flags and relation between tge title and description is a mess. – user1803551 May 11 '15 at 11:43

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