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The following scenario happened to me several times now:

I answer a question of a new (very low reputation) SO user. My answer stays the only one to this question. The OP does not react in any way, i.e. he/she neither votes/accepts nor posts a comment to say if it worked or not.

I find such situations a bit disappointing. If I take the time to answer a question, I would like to know, if my answer solved the problem or not, especially if I am the only answerer.

So now my question: Is it okay after a few days to post a comment, asking the OP to either accept or give some feedback, if it did not solve the problem? Or is this considered to be rude?

It is not about the reputation, I just would like to know if the problem is solved or not (and I think, in case it is solved, it should be marked as such, so we can better keep track of unsolved problems).

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    You can ask them, there's no problem there, and if they are very new users, you can also take them to the help-center. Just don't come complaining later on if they still don't give you any feedback. – Arun A S May 5 '15 at 7:36
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    I feel the same way as you. But usually, questions from these kinds of users end up with +0 or -1 votes or so, meaning the question will quickly fade into oblivion and it won't matter all that much in the grand scheme of things that it's incorrectly marked as unsolved. So after a while, I stopped noticing the disappointment. – abarnert May 5 '15 at 8:46
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    @durron597 I don't think it's a duplicate. That question is asking about users who do not respond to requests to improve their question. This question is asking about users who do not respond to answers being posted. Similar topics, completely different answers. – Radiodef May 6 '15 at 3:54
  • I usually comment something like "I hope I was able to help. If my answer did indeed solve your problem, please consider accepting it :)". – NullDev Feb 17 at 17:05
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It's okay to post a polite comment a couple of days later.

Make sure the tone is right, though. Pestering them for an accept is unlikely to actually achieve anything, plus it will make you look bad.

It is, however, normal for many OPs not to react to responses, or to abandon their question altogether. You're going to have to live with that from time to time.

If you're considering investing a lot of energy in an answer, and getting feedback is really important to you, check the OP's track record first.

Are they in a habit of accepting and/or giving feedback, or do they just ask away and never do anything?

Another good way to weed out lazy nonresponsive OPs is to hold off from answering right away, and to ask for some clarification first.

If no clarification is forthcoming, you can make realistic assumptions about their general responsiveness and leave the question alone.

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    there was a time when users were rated on question accepting and that rating was posted next to their image on question (100% accept rate, 80%, 20%, "won't even notice"). That was useful. Less to chase after the 100% types but more to avoid the other end of spectrum. – Dave Alperovich May 6 '15 at 3:50
  • I kindly disagree of you regarding "You're going to have to live with that from time to time.". I still think SO must do something about it once we put some effort on give a good and clear answer and has no feedback is very disappointing. Ask for a up vote or accept as an answer should be a flag option. – xpto Feb 18 at 15:21
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There are a few users who frequent the Python tag who sometimes drop in on questions that they didn't answer, but did comment on, and if there's an unaccepted answer that got a "thanks" or that's just obviously right, suggest to the OP that he accept the answer (with a link to the Help page on accepting).

There's almost no way it can seem rude or greedy or anything like that coming from a third party.

Obviously this isn't something you'd want to make mandatory, or even suggested, for the site, but if you can organize a cabal in your favorite subcommunity to do something similar, maybe you can all help each other (and the rest of that subcommunity).

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Is it okay after a few days to post a comment, asking the OP to either accept or give some feedback, if it did not solve the problem?

Yes. You can comment and request the OP to accept an answer and also link the comment to a post such as How does accepting an answer work?. You should, however, request the OP to accept any one of the answers instead of your answer.

Or is this considered to be rude?

No, but it depends. You must politely ask the OP and not force them to do something.

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    I would also add, if there are multiple questions, you should suggest to accept any answer, without mentioning yours at all. – amit May 5 '15 at 8:46
  • @amit , Did you mean "mutiple answers"? – Spikatrix May 5 '15 at 8:56
  • The problem in my case is, that my answer is the only one (usually questions on topics with relatively less followers here on SO). So saying "please accept any answer" is the same as "please accept my answer". That's basically the point why I am hesitating. – luator May 5 '15 at 10:59
  • @luator , You can say "Please accept an answer" – Spikatrix May 5 '15 at 11:01
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    @luator: Also, first check their profile whether they are conversant with accepting and voting. If they are, just let it be. – Deduplicator May 5 '15 at 14:17
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    Personally I only point out accepting if the OP specifically leaves a comment thanking me. (In which case it looks like they don't know about it.) I say something along the lines of "No problem! Consider accepting my answer if you think it solved the issue." – Radiodef May 6 '15 at 3:48
  • I just had a situatiion like this and I wrote "There are some potential answers. You might want to respond to them." - is that a correct wording? (Asking as a non-native speaker) – dkellner Feb 16 at 13:16
  • @dkellner Yes, the wording is correct, but I don't see how that comment relates to accepting an answer. – Spikatrix Feb 17 at 11:15
  • "If none of these answers helped you, please clarify your question or add a comment." – usr2564301 Feb 17 at 17:31

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