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This question already has an answer here:

TL;DR, user removed my "correct" answer after helping walk through the problem.

I recently answered this question: Android C++ Minimalist sample app: "Cannot find module with tag 'gpg-cpp-sdk/android' in import path. I wanted to help him out, that is what Stack Overflow is for. I helped walk the user through his environment variable issue (please read the comments).

Today I logged into Stack Overflow and he had posted his own answer and removed my answer as the "correct" answer.

I know there is nothing I can do about this but is there any way to watch out for users like this or handle this any better?

Possible solutions:

  • Ignore (Disengage, do not chase the checkmark)
  • Don't post an answer, possibly step through chat first

marked as duplicate by gnat, Luke, HaveNoDisplayName, Toto, hjpotter92 Nov 2 '15 at 10:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    You could comment asking what was deficient in yours. You shouldn't be chasing the checkmark, so be very careful with such comments. – BradleyDotNET Apr 30 '15 at 22:23
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    I have never seen this I'm not even a year on SO and this happened to me already many times. And If OP accepts another answer which is wrong I then just write a comment to warn him which errors the answer is missing. And if it is also a correct and good answer I sometimes ask him why the other answer was better, so that I can also make it better next time – Rizier123 Apr 30 '15 at 22:25
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    Ok well I guess that means that your answer didn't perfectly solve his problems. Hopefully he at least upvoted your answer. Which can't happen since he has 1 rep. That's too bad – ryanyuyu Apr 30 '15 at 22:27
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    @JaredBurrows no, but different people accept based on different reasons. I personally refuse to accept unless my core problem is solved. I'll still upvote anything helpful (like work arounds). – ryanyuyu Apr 30 '15 at 22:29
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    Based on the negative votes on this question, I am guessing everyone has seen this or does not like the quality? – Jared Burrows Apr 30 '15 at 22:36
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    While I'm downvoting your question here, I'm upvoting your answer and downvoting the OP's replication at the question in quesiton. Meta effect comes along weird voting results sometimes. – πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 30 '15 at 22:41
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    @JaredBurrows I think it's more, because it's a normal thing what happens on SO. That's how it goes and works, but at the end I can't tell you why you got downvotes because: People are strange animals – Rizier123 Apr 30 '15 at 22:41
  • @Rizier123 Alright, thanks. I guess I am looking at this the wrong way. – Jared Burrows Apr 30 '15 at 22:43
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    @JaredBurrows Well, why I've been downvoting here is, because I think MSO shouldn't been asked about single question situations, but with somewhat more broad appliance for a particular question and answer pattern found more regularly. – πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 30 '15 at 22:45
  • On my end I -1 because I found the title downright lame. Now seeing to which extent you've been to help him, I somewhat understand a bit more but still. You don't seem in bad need of that 15 rep... :) – Félix Gagnon-Grenier May 1 '15 at 0:06
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    I just do not understand "why" It's because the user felt like the answer they derived/wrote was the one they chose to accept. There are no requirements to accept an answer at all, and there are certainly no rules to prevent you from changing your mind after accepting, and there are certainly no requirements or rules for a user to comment regarding doing either. – Ken White May 1 '15 at 1:04
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    @JaredBurrows maybe something like "what to do about op taking credit for my walkthrough of his problem" ? – Félix Gagnon-Grenier May 1 '15 at 2:16
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    @FélixGagnon-Grenier Thank you. I updated my question's title. – Jared Burrows May 1 '15 at 2:19
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It happens. You could try asking in a comment to the OP's answer, or editing your answer to include whatever new information or context might be missing. But Accepting Answers: How does it work? says (in part),

The bottom line is that you should accept the answer that you found to be the most helpful to you, personally.

Which means only the asker gets to decide what answer was/is the most helpful.

  • Hey, thank you for your feedback. That link has been especially helpful. – Jared Burrows May 1 '15 at 2:19

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