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I recently started following the tag when I noticed that questions seem have a lot of cross over with . Formally, I don't think I would not argue that they are synonymous. I think of as a discipline of mathematics, and as implementing Boolean logic on some type of physical system.

However, looking at the few issues that are tagged with these tags it seems like functionally people are applying to them the same kind of questions. is really being used in a way that is synonymous with . It seems as though gets associated with more hardware (as in FPGA) type questions, and is associated with more software questions but that is probably just due to how the same concept is referred to in those different disciplines.

I obviously don't have enough reputation to suggest the synonym anyway, but I am interested to see what other people think and why? Maybe if we do come to a consensus someone with the rep can suggest the synonym. Neither tag has much traffic so there could be advantages to combining the two.

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    Digital logic is a superset of boolean logic. There's questions about the digital discipline that aren't about boolean logic (for example threshold values) although they would be a bit off topic here? But digital logic can also include trinary and higher values, so long as they discretized. Boolean logic is a type of digital logic, but a very specialized and important type. Worthy of different tags IMO. – Gabe Sechan Apr 29 '15 at 20:05
  • Yeah I thought about the fact that there are things like threshold values, signalling standards, etc that would be considered part of digital logic but I also came to the conclusion that they would be off topic here. You make a good point about trinary and etc. logic though as that could fall into the category of digital logic. – Ian Apr 29 '15 at 20:16
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They're closely related, but they're not the same thing.

Just a quick sample of the questions under the tag suggest that these particular questions deal with actual digital circuits, like microprocessors:

...whereas deals with boolean logic in programming languages, generally at a higher level of abstraction:

Let's not relate these tags. At a surface description they sound the same, but there are real differences in the scope of questions in these tags.

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