I currently work in business intelligence and data warehousing. When I was first learning about the topics, I was pretty sad to find that SO wasn't really as good for these topics as it is for many others. Quite often I found questions from people as confused as I was which sometimes had a string of comments but no real answers, and it looked like the OPs had often wandered away and presumably gotten answers elsewhere - as did I. It was just frustrating digging through loads of very similar questions with very few relevant answers, or finding a question which was exactly what I was wondering, but seeing it was from a year ago and had no useful activity.

I noticed in the recent survey that people working in BI and data warehousing are a relative rarity on SO, which probably explains why this is the case. Knowing that, and having picked up a fair bit of knowledge in the meantime, I've been trying to improve the situation - by answering, commenting on, flagging, and (just recently) proposing edits on recent, active questions.

However, there are still a lot of older questions hanging around with no answers, or at least no accepted answers. Some of these questions aren't amazingly clear or well written - often just because the asker was probably quite new to the topic, rather than out of laziness. Sometimes there's a series of comments where it looks like the asker has gotten enough information to probably get their work done, but no one's actually submitted an answer. Sometimes in the comments people have been told this isn't the right site and that BI isn't programming! Sometimes there are unaccepted answers, and while some are good others are incomplete or not really correct.

My question is this: given I want to help improve the BI-related tag areas (business-intelligence, dimensional-modelling, data-warehouse, etc.), where is my time best spent? What improvements are likely to have the most noticeable positive impact on the quality of information available? I don't have tons of free time - especially at the moment - so I have to pick and choose.

Also, I just haven't been actively using SO long enough to be sure what is the best way to tackle some of these old questions that are hanging around.

  • Should I just try to answer them whenever possible even though they're unlikely to be looked at by the asker, working around any gaps in the given information? Or even if the asker has almost certainly long since figured it out for themselves?
  • In some cases, should inactive questions that aren't adding any value be flagged, and if so flagged as what?
  • Should I encourage people who've essentially answered in the comments to add what they've said as an answer, even if it happened quite a while ago?

I had a read of this (Enable automatic deletion of old, unanswered zero-score questions after a year?), but it doesn't apply to some of the old stuff I'm talking about because in some cases people have voted the questions up, or have answered but nothing has been accepted.

  • 4
    Side note: Consider using "views" as indicator of usefulness, don't spend too much effort (short of -1/close) on rarely found/visited posts. – Alexei Levenkov Apr 26 '15 at 7:06
  • Your valid questions aside, you may be interested in DBA.SE, where the topics you are interested in are well served by a smaller but more database- and BI-focused audience than the one on SO. Some tag links: dimensional-modeling, business-intelligence, data-warehouse – Nick Chammas Apr 27 '15 at 3:32
  • Just as a brief follow-up: I've already had some success in chasing people up with comments, and the three answers here have all given helpful advice. I'm still very much open to any more tips, but I'm feeling much clearer about how to spend my SO time to best effect. :) I will try to keep an eye on the DBA SE as well if time allows; I didn't realise BI development questions were welcome there as well, but I do sometimes use it for other topics. Thanks for the heads up! – Jo Douglass Apr 27 '15 at 12:04
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The other answers have some valuable information, so I will keep this "short".

In some cases, should inactive questions that aren't adding any value be flagged, and if so flagged as what?

As someone who patrols a niche tag, I know that flagging won't do any good. There are maybe 2 other users looking at those tags regularly. 3 users is not enough to close a question (need at least 5 users). When you flag a question it will go into the close vote review queue. In my experience reviewers tend to filter reviews based on tags. So it is unlikely that someone is actively reviewing questions in those specific tags that you listed.

The only thing that might attract other users to review close votes, is if the question actually also has a much more popular tag on it. I don't say that you should go ahead and add to all questions, but rather add a language tag where it might help the question and is appropriate (if code is present then it is almost always appropriate).

If you are determined to "remove" bad questions, you can ask in the SO Close Vote Reviewers chat room whether they are comfortable in helping you out in those tags. You would then use your flags to put questions into the review queue and they would vote on them to be closed.

Without looking at those tags, I would say the following three close reasons are most appropriate: unclear what you're asking, too broad and primarily opinion-based.

There are also a lot of questions without answers and zero score. If you see a bad one (unsalvagable), downvote it and it will be roomba'd. Don't downvote questions that you only find uninteresting (not synonymous to low quality) and there is nothing else wrong with it.


Take the view count into consideration when looking for questions that need work. A high view count suggests that people are looking for answers for those questions. (Sample search query)

If the question is good, try to answer it, edit it to make it better. Titles are the most important thing from a usefullness standpoint. Make it so that the title actually summarizes the question in a single sentence.

If the question is bad, downvote and/or flag where possible. E.g. there is no need to waste everyones time by keeping it around when there is no answer and likely won't be.

  • 1
    This is really helpful, thanks! Everyone has given good advice, but I particularly appreciate getting tips about handling a low-traffic tag. I had noticed that flagging gets a slow response, but didn't realise why. These tips will definitely help me improve things, and hopefully I'll be able to help even more once I work my way up to further privileges. I'll have a look through the searches you've suggested! – Jo Douglass Apr 27 '15 at 11:54
  • Flags and close votes age away. That's why niche tags are a little different. – Artjom B. Apr 27 '15 at 12:03
  • Right, that's useful to know. Do you know how quickly that happens, or is that information not publicized? – Jo Douglass Apr 27 '15 at 12:10
  • That changed recently. I would think that flags age away in the same way. – Artjom B. Apr 27 '15 at 14:36

What improvements are likely to have the most noticeable positive impact on the quality of information available?

Much more can be done. To name a few :

  • Whenever you bump into an unanswered question, and find a solution later, post it here. This is likely to help others who would end up here with the same problem.

  • You can always edit poor(unreadable) content.


Should I just try to answer them whenever possible even though they're unlikely to be looked at by the asker, working around any gaps in the given information? Or even if the asker has almost certainly long since figured it out for themselves?

YES, even they're no more of use to the askers, they might help future audience who would land up here.

In some cases, should inactive questions that aren't adding any value be flagged, and if so flagged as what?

No effort/Low-quality questions should be flagged/close-voted. But not all of the inactive questions are worth the flag. You might leave this to the system to begin with.

Should I encourage people who've essentially answered in the comments to add what they've said as an answer, even if it happened quite a while ago?

Surely, Yes. But, if it has happened a while ago, I don't think they would respond. So IMO, as a helper to the community, you should answer it yourself and put the comment link/name as a reference.

  • 3
    I think as much as anything else, I'm just wanting to see whether more experienced users see putting this sort of effort into old content is worthwhile/a good idea, and it's not just my personal bugbear - so thanks for the feedback. In part I just didn't know whether trying to get people to update with answers would be welcome, and whether answering myself was OK if the question had essentially already been answered in the comments. Now I feel like the former is a positive action regardless of the response, and the latter is OK if it'll otherwise be left unanswered. – Jo Douglass Apr 25 '15 at 19:07
  • Whilst it's worth doing, it's not a way to earn any rep - older questions don't get anywhere near as much attention, and quite possibly the primary asker (with most incentive to upvote/mark-accepted) isn't looking any more. Personally I feel that's one of the drawbacks of Stack Overflow's rep system. – Sobrique Apr 27 '15 at 16:29
  • True. Not a good way to earn rep. But some questions end up ranked top on google searches. Those are which most users bump on and if these are unanswered then something should be done. Atleast add community wiki answers so there is no rep thing coming in way. – Shaunak D Apr 27 '15 at 16:43

Age doesn't matter. (Much.)

If you have an answer, answer it! Someone else might find it; the green checkmark is not the only measure of value.

If something deserves to be closed, flag it! If not, don't.

If someone answered in comments, ask them to flesh it out! Or post an answer of your own as community wiki and explain it's based on the comments.

The only real variable I've found so far is whether to bug someone to work on something, which is more based on how active they've been recently and how likely you think they would be to remember or reconstruct what they were thinking. That doesn't change answers or closing, though.

  • 3
    Oooh, thanks for pointing out the community wiki idea! I hadn't thought of that, and I've been really iffy about posting answers which are based on other people's comments and it looking like I'm taking credit. And yeah, I think the "is this worth chasing someone about?" bit is where I've been having a hard time deciding what's worth tackling and what isn't. I'm tempted to perhaps add a few comments to ask for answers/see if missing info can be added, and if nothing is done perhaps add wiki answers/flag as unclear depending on the situation. – Jo Douglass Apr 25 '15 at 18:34

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .