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This question already has an answer here:

I recently posted a question that was "put on hold as primarily opinion-based". In the explanation it says (emphasis mine):

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.

But my question had no answers yet. How can reviewers be asked to predict what "will tend to be"? As far as I can tell the question was not worded in a way to ask for opinions, and I even tried to clarify it to specifically ask for fact-based answers, despite the closers not providing any reasoning for their close option.

Should the explanation for "put on hold as primarily opinion-based" be changed so that a question can only be closed when it actually gets some opinion-based answers? Or should this close-reason be disabled until there is at least 1 answer?


Edit: My recommendation is that the wording for this close-reason be changed to be based on the contents of the question & answers rather than what "will tend to be".

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question are almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise; or the question is specifically asking for opinions.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Mureinik, Code Lღver, Michael Irigoyen, HaveNoDisplayName Apr 21 '15 at 21:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    You are missing the key phrase.... will tend to be.... the point is questions of a specific nature attract questions that are only opinions, and/or it is very difficult to answer with anything else other than an opinion. – psubsee2003 Apr 21 '15 at 19:03
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    Meh. So if it's not a pure-bred opinion question, it's a list question. It should be closed either way, little point arguing over the exactly correct reason. – Pekka 웃 Apr 21 '15 at 19:11
  • @psubsee2003 - There are certainly ways to answer this question with facts. Someone wrote a few comments with wonderful factual answers but they were deleted for some reason. The fact is that no one provided an opinionated answer... so I'm still confused what it was about the question that made it seem "opinionated". – Luke Apr 21 '15 at 19:37
  • "little point arguing over the exactly correct reason" I respectfully disagree with this. If it doesn't matter what people choose when closing a question, why bother having a choice? If it's a "list question" and that's bad, I would like to know so I can improve the quality of my questions. – Luke Apr 21 '15 at 19:39
  • Downvoters: Please provide some comments to help improve the question... or an answer. – Luke Apr 21 '15 at 19:56
  • The answers are the answers and will always be the answers. – Trilarion Apr 21 '15 at 20:33
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Which things can be done with A but not with B?

This is not a good question for Stack Overflow. The kind of questions that make SO the great resource it is, are questions like:

  • How can I do X with A?
  • Why can't I do X with A?
  • How can I do X with A, which I do like Y with B?

Those are tightly-scoped questions that can be answered with facts and links to resources proving those facts. There is a finite number of answers to them, of which the quality can be controlled.

Now the question "What are the differences between A and B?" can lead to a plethora of answers. Some of them are false, others were true but are now outdated, some of them are opinion-based and as such the page containing the question and answers is worth nothing, as the visitor isn't very likely to find the answer to the question they were researching.

I mean, just about the "secure offline" part of the question, or "How can you implement a PDF-like DRM for web applications" you could write a couple of books.

That being said, the proper close reason would be "too broad": too many possible answers, and the answers you do ask for would be too long for SO.

  • Thank you. "Too broad" is probably the correct reasoning for closing that question. But this does not answer: How can reviewers be asked to predict what "will tend to be"? Seems like closing an "opinionated" question is itself very opinionated. – Luke Apr 21 '15 at 19:41
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    @Luke there's a fine line between "too broad" and "opinion-based". "How would you..."-questions are both, but more the latter. Your question was more of the former. – CodeCaster Apr 21 '15 at 19:46

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