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For questions, I am constantly asking whether the asker is using ASP.Net 5 (full framework) or ASP.Net Core 5 (cross-platform framework). This is partly a naming problem inherited from Microsoft, but currently, we only have one tag for two very different frameworks.

Would it be reasonable to create a new tag to assist people in finding those questions and helping answerers to distinguish the issues?

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    I'd prefer [asp.net-5] and [.net-core] (two tags). Since the core exists for multiple parts of the .NET framework, not just ASP.NET. Since all ASP.NET 5 Core questions will necessarily also be ASP.NET 5 questions, it makes more sense to use two tags to capture the venn diagram. – George Stocker Apr 21 '15 at 14:16
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    Not sure about that, @George. The principal reason behind core's existence is to run ASP.NET applications without requiring IIS. – Robert Harvey Apr 21 '15 at 14:19
  • Oh, I should also mention: github.com/aspnet/Announcements/issues/3 - they're changing the name from aspnet50 to dnx50 and aspnetcore50 to dnxcore50 - I don't know how well tags can be renamed, but it seems even asp.net-5 already aren't related to asp.net directly. (I've personally made console apps.) – Matt DeKrey Apr 21 '15 at 14:25
  • Do you ask that question for each asp.net-5 post? I assume only a small subset of questions need the distinction. – Stijn Apr 21 '15 at 14:25
  • I ask the question related to everything that involves not knowing where MS moved X; it makes the difference between whether it's gone or moved. Package dependency issues, missing APIs, compiler errors... which are currently the majority of the issues, since the new frameworks are so different. – Matt DeKrey Apr 21 '15 at 14:29
  • @RobertHarvey More specifically, without requiring Windows. We've already been able to run things outside of IIS with OWIN (SignalR and Web API). MVC is getting the same treatment in v6, but that isn't tied to the Core CLR. – vcsjones Apr 21 '15 at 14:29
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    @RobertHarvey I think if someone has an IIS specific question, that'll be a tag for itself; so yea. Unless the question is specifically about an IIS interaction, I don't see it mattering. If it is, then it should have the IIS tag anyway. – George Stocker Apr 21 '15 at 14:33
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    they're changing the name from aspnet50 to dnx50 and aspnetcore50 to dnxcore50 -- Of course they are. Because Microsoft has never had a problem with naming things. – Robert Harvey Apr 21 '15 at 14:47
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    @RobertHarvey So true. – George Stocker Apr 21 '15 at 14:58
  • I haven't moved onto asp.net 5 yet but as it stands I have no idea what the difference is between asp.net 5 and asp.net core 5. Is this something that will become clear when I start working in version 5? Is this well known and will it be easy for people to make the distinction between the tags? – rdans Apr 22 '15 at 10:14
  • For the new structure, you can configure your frameworks in the project.json file, which indicates Core or not, or both. See github.com/aspnet/Home/wiki/Project.json-file - this file references "not Core" as "Desktop" in a few places - perhaps that's a candidate? It's not clear anywhere else, though. – Matt DeKrey Apr 22 '15 at 14:24
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I think the following tags make sense:

  • for all ASP.NET 5 questions
  • when it's on .NET Core / Core CLR (regardless of whether it's ASP.NET)
  • , , , etc. when it's on .NET Framework (regardless of whether it's ASP.NET)
  • when it's a DNX-specific issue (e.g. running a dnx . run command, etc.). There are already several questions in this tag BTW.

The reason I suggest these tags is that the same type of sub-question about the platform can come up to do with architecture (x86, x64, etc.), underlying OS (Windows, Mac OS, *nix, etc.). We certainly wouldn't want to have a tag, along with the other gazillion tags that would be needed.


Also worth pointing out, regarding Robert Harvey's comment:

Not sure about that, @George. The principal reason behind core's existence is to run ASP.NET applications without requiring IIS.

That's not quite true. Hosting ASP.NET applications outside of IIS has been supported for years, including the Visual Studio Web Server (ok that one wasn't so great :) ), but more significantly using Katana, where SignalR and Web API ran great, as well as 3rd party frameworks such as Nancy.

  • "Hosting ASP.NET applications outside of IIS has been supported for years" -- But not really relevant to Microsoft's official efforts. – Robert Harvey Apr 21 '15 at 18:15
  • @RobertHarvey the Katana project was from Microsoft and was official and has been around for ~2 years or so (plus more if you include previews). – Eilon Apr 21 '15 at 18:17
  • The entire ASP.NET 5 project has been renamed ASP.NET core. – Warren P Jan 20 '16 at 12:05

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