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I'm struck by Stack Overflow approach, or the lack of, towards corrected answers that never recover after initial downvote.

A person publishes an answer to a question. Someone comes along and says "the answer is wrong/incomplete/etc.", and downvotes it.

The person who published the answer comes back and edits his answer, possibly with a significant change, like 50% or over.

What happens after this - precisely nothing. The person who downvoted the answer won't bother to change his vote, and other people won't even bother to look at an answer valued below 0. And that happens all the time even when the answer becomes really good, possibly even the best, but readers here don't care much about answers below 0, even if it is just -1.

What should be instead, a significantly modified answer should get an automatic credit towards it, to shake off a few downvotes, so it can be reassessed fairly after the change.

The current alternative is deleting your own answer and re-publishing it again - but that's very discouraging, and a poor solution.

I would suggest, if it is still within -3, throw it back to 0, if there was 50% or more changed in the answer.

A joke: after all the downvotes, a person posts on Stack Overflow;

I asked a question and it got downvoted into splinters. So, my questions is - "What's wrong with you people?"

And the correct answer was: Nobody really knows.

Accepted :)

  • The time frame to improve is pretty limited (estimated 1st 50 minutes the question appears at the front page). If the question itself doesn't attract a lot of notion, your answer is unlikely to be seen and upvoted after improvement at all. – πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 19 '15 at 16:53
  • If the question has been downvoted the principal of the answer was probably wrong - so any improvement will still probably not be enough to make it a good answer. – JBithell Apr 19 '15 at 16:55
  • @πάνταῥεῖ A good question may not necessarily attract immediate attention, it may take the right people looking for the same to find the question and up-vote it. And there is no relation between a down-voted answer and the question's popularity. – vitaly-t Apr 19 '15 at 16:57
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    never recover, never is a very long time. If the edit corrects all the mistakes then it will get organic votes over the years it is visible to hundreds of programmers and will recover. Avoid hoping for instant gratification if the first version of your answer is wrong. If you have high confidence that your new answer is correct then you can simply delete your old one and post the new one. – Hans Passant Apr 19 '15 at 17:01
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    @HansPassant, you are an optimist, but it doesn't help encouraging answer improvement, not at all. – vitaly-t Apr 19 '15 at 17:06
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    @vitaly, what if a significantly modified answer was actually edited for the worst (it does happen sometimes). Awarding an automatic credit would be counter-productive then. – Frédéric Hamidi Apr 19 '15 at 17:10
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    Why is "encouragement" needed? If you don't care about improving your answer, why bother posting one at all? – Hans Passant Apr 19 '15 at 17:11
  • @HansPassant, because of the way StackOverflow works, the first answer attracts most of initial attention, so it often gets rushed in because of that. – vitaly-t Apr 19 '15 at 17:14
  • @FrédéricHamidi, It wouldn't be, if you keep it within reason, because you would only do it to an answer that's currently below 0, and you wouldn't bring it up above 0, which should be fine, imo. – vitaly-t Apr 19 '15 at 17:17
  • @vitaly-t "What's wrong with you people?" You're starting to walk an edge here. – πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 19 '15 at 17:58
  • Ironically, one needs a sense of humour to walk an edge :) I'll try not to push it any further though :) – vitaly-t Apr 19 '15 at 18:12
  • Let's hope the comment is a bit more detailled than "it's wrong". And always keep your tone polite and constructive, unless you want unconstructive responses. Also, humor is very hard to convey, text is a very bad medium for it. – Deduplicator Apr 19 '15 at 18:17
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    Doctor, doctor, it hurts when I post crap. – bmargulies Apr 19 '15 at 19:18
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    "I would suggest, if it is still within -3, throw it back to 0, if there was 50% or more changed in the answer." You don't think people would game the hell out of this? – Bill the Lizard Apr 19 '15 at 21:28
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    Make any random edit that changes 50% of the text in order to remove downvotes. This proposal just replaces a small problem with a bigger problem. – Bill the Lizard Apr 19 '15 at 21:44
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"The person who published the answer comes back and edits his answer, possibly with a significant change, like 50% or over."

"What happens after this - precisely nothing. The person who down-voted the answer won't bother to change his vote, and other people won't even bother to look at an answer valued below 0. And that happens all the time even when the answer becomes really good, possibly even the best, but readers here don't care much about answers below 0, even if it is just -1."

Well, that sounds a bit like of a catch 22 situation as you describe it, but it's not entirely true:

  • Downvoters won't come back to your question to revise their vote, since they'll not even get a notion about your change.
  • "and other people won't even bother to look at an answer valued below 0." That's a pure assumption. Future visitors (like me) may take a look to your answer though, and judge if it's valid or not.
  • An assumption based on a long observation tends to be the right one. – vitaly-t Apr 19 '15 at 17:59
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    @vitaly-t Well, I'm one of the users, who is attracted by any unusual voted post, as for down-/up-votes equally. And I may leave another up-/down-/close- vote or comment. – πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 19 '15 at 18:02
  • fair play to you, i'd wish for more like yourself around here then ;) And I can't even quote your name in the comment :) – vitaly-t Apr 19 '15 at 18:04
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    Well, I normally look at all answers. Or at least at all which might have changed since a previous look. And I vote on the post as-is, not on its score, so maybe it's not useful enough (yet) in that question... – Deduplicator Apr 19 '15 at 18:14
  • @Deduplicator, it answers the question, but very subjectively. – vitaly-t Apr 19 '15 at 18:16
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If someone tells you need to add to your answer, then add to your answer. Try editing the answer from there and adding elements such as espically:

  • WHY and HOW your answer works and solves the question asked.
  • Providing an example using jsfiddle or codepen.
  • Adding extra detail to it to make sure it stands out from the other answers.

Once you add elements such as these it will become to become a higher quality answer, and usually these kinds of answers get upvoted over others.

  • It's all common guidelines here, and I wouldn't publish my suggestion if I thought those always worked. It's like in an old expression - "the letter of the law vs the spirit of the law". – vitaly-t Apr 19 '15 at 17:24

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