9

There is a particular question about Toolbars in Android, and there was one link-only answer. Considering that link-only answers expire over time, I copied the content over and formatted it according to how SO displays data.

However, people claim that making a mirror copy of the site's content is "plagiarism", even if the link itself is specified as the source of the content.

Which is the better solution? What should one do to improve the quality of the site, while also not "plagiarize"? What is the right procedure when dealing with link-only answers like these?

  • 1
    Copying part of a blog over for reference while clearly indicating that it is copied content (that's what the quote function in the editor is for) with a clearly visible link to the source is ok. But if you look at what you did (link to the revision in question) than I would say that this is far from ok. Sure the link is right there at the top of the post, but then you edited in the whole blog post without any indication that it is copied content or that it is in fact copied from this blog. This is plagiarism, no question about it. – Xaver Kapeller Apr 19 '15 at 15:11
  • To add to this, as the original poster of one of the answers (since reverted), my answer was suddenly full of somebody else's content. Whether original or copied, I dislike having several screenfuls of other peoples words attributed to me. I'd rather you downvote my link answer and post a better one of your own. – Martin Stone Apr 19 '15 at 15:12
  • And in the next revision (this one) you just added "MIRRORED FROM LINK" at the top. I wouldn't call this proper attribution either. Without the markup it wouldn't even be clear where you copied it from. – Xaver Kapeller Apr 19 '15 at 15:13
  • 3
    Also I completely disagree with your statement that there were two link only answers. While @MartingStone's answer clearly is a link only answer the other one is not. This answer was a perfectly good answer to the question in its first revision. The link was just there for reference. There was no need for your actions. – Xaver Kapeller Apr 19 '15 at 15:22
  • 1
    I would just roll your edits back, but since you felt the need bring this up on meta I am going wait a little bit. I am just sorry for @Laurenswuyts that you turned her perfectly reasonable answer into, well, all this. – Xaver Kapeller Apr 19 '15 at 15:26
  • @XaverKapeller I did roll that one back too, I guess you're right that that was excessive. But I still think it's a bit of a hassle for the future when these links will no longer be accessible - because they never are if you wait long enough. – EpicPandaForce Apr 19 '15 at 15:53
  • 1
    @EpicPandaForce I agree that link-only answers can be a problem, but as I said before this answer was perfectly reasonable. The link was not there to answer the question, it was just there for reference. And if that link breaks in one or two years or even 3 months than it won't really be a problem because the answer without the link still answers the question perfectly. – Xaver Kapeller Apr 19 '15 at 15:58
  • 2
    I would also like to add that you cannot fix a link-only answer by editing the whole content it links to into the answer itself. If you see a link only answer than flag it as "not an answer". – Xaver Kapeller Apr 19 '15 at 16:00
  • In the times I've found a link to somewhere else to be the best answer, I usually post the link, and quote a paragraph or so (that way if the link eventually breaks, the answer won't be completely useless). – Wug Apr 19 '15 at 21:12
  • 1
    It is clear that the intention was not 'Plagiarism'. Lets just keep it with 'Incorrectly quoted sources' or something with a lesser stigma to the author of the quote. – YoYo Apr 19 '15 at 21:50
12

Copying part of a blog over for reference while clearly indicating that it is copied content (that's what the quote function in the editor is for) with a clearly visible link to the source is ok. But if you look at what you did (link to the revision in question) then I would say that this is far from ok.
Sure the link is right there at the top of the post, but you edited in the whole blog post without any indication that it is copied content or that it is in fact copied from this blog. This is plagiarism, no question about it.

And in the next revision (this one) you just added "MIRRORED FROM LINK" at the top. I wouldn't call this proper attribution either. Without the markup it wouldn't even be clear where you copied it from.


But most importantly the answer was completely reasonable in its first revision. There was no need for you to do what you did. It answered the question perfectly and the link was just there for reference.

You cannot fix a potential link-only answer by editing in the whole content it links to. If you encounter a link-only answer in the future (and please be sure that it actually is a link-only answer this time) then flag it as "not an answer". You can also down vote it if you like, but I would think twice before doing anything more than that. Because at best, you are just going to make matters worse. An answer that is 98% quoted content from a blog isn't any better than a link-only answer.

  • Valid point on the one that had content on its own, I admit my wrong. However, if that reflects my intentions a bit clearer, there was for example a post here stackoverflow.com/a/687759/2413303 that linked to an Oracle blog that no longer existed. I mirrored its content from web.archive so that it wouldn't just point to a blog that no longer exists, and in this case, tried to be proactive (in case the web.archive bots gets 302 on crawl). But if this is against the guidelines of any kind, I'll refrain from doing that, unless the link actually no longer exists. – EpicPandaForce Apr 19 '15 at 16:18
  • 3
    You forgot the check to make sure the blog has a compatible licence. And if the link is only for reference, mirroring the pointed to page would often just degrade the post. – Deduplicator Apr 19 '15 at 18:45
  • I'm not sure why you say "An answer that is 98% quoted content from a blog isn't any better than a link-only answer." It is better: it will last as long as the answer itself does, and have the same license (assuming, per @Deduplicator, a compatible license), so it can be reused. Assuming it picks out the right excerpt from the original, one substantially smaller than simply copying the whole thing, it has the further advantage of being more concise than the source. That's not to say copy-paste is magical unicorn dust, but considering it just another form of link-only answer seems wrong. – Nathan Tuggy Oct 26 '15 at 2:11
-1

First of all, "plagiarism" is an academic charge and is defined that the institution you are associated with. Presumably, different schools have different boundaries for what constitutes plagiarism. If you are not associated with an academic institution, plagiarism means no more than blasphemy does to an atheist.

Outside the academic world, the major concern is copyright violation. In no jurisdiction I am aware of, and certainly not in the US, is an attributed snippet of a noncommercial work used for noncommercial purposes considered a copyright violation.

There are two other issues you should be aware of. First is proper attribution. You have a moral, an ethical, and occasionally a legal obligation to give credit where it is due. Quotations should be marked as quotations, the author should be named, and a link given.

Then there is brevity. StackOverflow exists to answer specific questions. Don't pull entire blog post. Summarize, excerpt, and link.

  • Yeah, an entire blog post also doesn't qualify as an "attributed snippet" :-) – Bergi Apr 20 '15 at 1:16
  • @ZeroPiraeus: True, but it's mostly in academia that it's a potentially career-ending mistake. In other fields the consequences are usually much less and the awareness somewhat less as well. – Nathan Tuggy Apr 20 '15 at 7:07

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .