14

Please have a quick look at this review:

The edit suggested a change in the code - which in my opinion, and also from others (judging from other meta posts on this topic) is really something that should be discussed with the original author first - even if the edit perfectly makes sense.

This does not seem to be a single case, but a pattern of wrongly(?) approved edits. I had at least 2 other similar cases in the last few weeks.

Do we want to tackle that? We could e.g. leave a note for editors to remind that all non-trivial code changes should be discussed in the comments first.

For the reviewers we could adapt the address the author rejection message and explicitly mention that non-trivial code changes also fall into that category.

  • What's wrong with the code edit? Stops the file processing code running if there's no file to open. Also I'm confused by your close reason (This edit was intended to address the author of the post...), unless that was referring to a different edit. – Robert Grant Apr 14 '15 at 14:04
  • 5
    On the one hand, it's a correct edit, and I'd welcome such an edit on any of my posts. On the other hand, I'd probably be annoyed if people were approving it without understanding it. – davidism Apr 14 '15 at 14:16
  • 3
    In this specific case, the edit was correcting a genuine bug in my answer. I'd have appreciated if I had been given a heads-up in a comment instead, and the suggested edit was made if I had not responded. That's an etiquette choice. But in that light I can see that the rejections on that review side with the give the author a heads-up first workflow. – Martijn Pieters Apr 14 '15 at 14:55
  • On the other hand, I've had to reject or roll back edits that were materially wrong, and the reviewers had not understood that the change was wrong. See these revisions for an example of a suggested edit gone astray. – Martijn Pieters Apr 14 '15 at 14:57
  • 9
    So, yes, for me as an active answerer, I would be in favour of suggested edits coming only after commenting has not resulted in a response. – Martijn Pieters Apr 14 '15 at 14:58
  • It would be cool if in such cases (the edit is non-trivial) the guideline is to reject but the after rejection a comment is automatically attached to the question and refers to a temporary storage of the edit. Something like a "suggested but unapproved edit" category. – Trilarion Mar 11 '16 at 9:46
1

I just rolled back an edit on this question (number 3 in the edit history) because an editor "fixed" the code (actually he still left one error in) to be correct python code, when it turns out that the OP was experiencing syntax errors caused by the very problems the editor fixed.

It is unfortunate that the edit got approved.

I would love to see some sort of warning on the edit page along the lines of "Be cautious when editing code, as you may be removing the actual problem the question is about". In addition, a message to editors reminding them of this would be great too.

Of course, there is no guarantee that it still won't happen, but this is exactly what shouldn't be getting approved.

EDIT: I didn't realize that I could look at the voting on the suggested edit on that one, and now that I do, I see that it was the OP that approved the edit. As the OP is a lower rep user, it is quite possible that they don't understand the process well enough to know that this is not a good edit. There is really nothing that could be done about the OP approving it, but this is probably a stronger argument for why there needs to be a warning on the edit page to the editor warning about being cautious in this case. The OP may even think this is an acceptable way to "answer" the question, and approved for that reason.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .