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I left a comment on this answer https://stackoverflow.com/a/29607240/103167

Basically it provided a different perspective, pointing out one small fact that had been omitted from an otherwise very comprehensive answer. It did not meet any of the criteria for flagging.

That comment is gone.

Would one of the diamond mods be so kind as to see whether it was lost due to a technical glitch or intentional deletion, and if intentional, the circumstances surrounding it?

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    Based on my previous experiences with comment moderation, it's probably another case of "comments are temporary, somebody flagged it, so we don't care that we delete useful information"... – l4mpi Apr 14 '15 at 9:12
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    @Ben, could you repost the comment here from memory? That would give us more context. – Frédéric Hamidi Apr 14 '15 at 9:15
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    That raises an other concern: should we use comments to post technical "details" (corner cases, variations, limitations, ...) ? Or should we post an other answer "as a complement of" the original one ? Or should we edit the original answer to provide those additional details ? As of myself, I tend to use comments for that purpose, but apparently... – Sylvain Leroux Apr 14 '15 at 9:28
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    Comments are temporary..? – Josh Apr 14 '15 at 9:45
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    Aren't comments under version-control like questions are? Can you 100.000.000k rep users actually see the deleted comments, like you do see the deleted questions/answers? – Theolodis Apr 14 '15 at 9:49
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    @SylvainLeroux I would say comments to an existing answer are much more useful than extra answers. There's more chance of them being seen, keeps all the info in one place and doesn't encourage near-duplicate answers. It also wouldn't be appropriate for all users with some sort of input to edit the original answer and wouldn't be fair to expect people to be able to moderate such edits, especially where there is disagreement on the topic. – rdans Apr 14 '15 at 9:53
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    It was deleted by a mod due to a 'not constructive' flag. Reading the comment, I agree with it being deleted. It was cute, but as phrased didn't need to stay around. Not a glitch. – George Stocker Apr 14 '15 at 10:08
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    @George, could you quote the comment, please (if it's not immoral against Ben)? – TLama Apr 14 '15 at 10:09
  • @Theolodis No, regular users cannot see deleted comments, no matter how high their rep is. Only diamond mods can see them. – Reto Koradi Apr 14 '15 at 20:22
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    There is some irony in a comment about destructors being deleted as "not constructive". ;) – Reto Koradi Apr 14 '15 at 20:27
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As George mentioned the comment was flagged as not constructive. The exact comment was:

TL;DR version: The destructor is called by C1::Dispose(), not the code that uses delete. – Ben Voigt 23 hours ago

I reviewed the answer and the comment and didn't think it added anything to the conversation so I approved the flag and deleted the comment. Comments are considered temporary. If you want to post a technical comment that criticizes or expands on an answer, then I'd suggest maybe wording it differently. The current wording was a bit non-constructive which is why it was deleted.

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    You know what else is "non-constructive" IMO? Deleting comments that cause no harm whatsoever, and potentially contain useful information. – l4mpi Apr 14 '15 at 13:48
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    @l4mpi As Chris points out if the comment was truly important, then it should be fleshed out into another answer. – Taryn Apr 14 '15 at 13:53
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    You didn't think it added anything because you are not familiar with the technical issue at hand. Getting a reply comment suggesting to reword it would have been nice; I shouldn't have to rely on happening across the question again while I still remember the point I previously made. In any case, I've created an answer to fill in the holes left by Hans. – Ben Voigt Apr 14 '15 at 14:07
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    @BenVoigt I don't need to be familiar the the technical issue to make a judgment call on the constructive nature of the comment. IMO, it could have been worded better which is why I deleted it. – Taryn Apr 14 '15 at 14:17
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    @bluefeet sorry, I don't understand that thought process at all. Your reasons for deletion seem to have been "it could have been worded better" and "anything important should be written in an answer". None of those are IMO valid arguments for deletion of content. The content is there already, it does not harm anybody, and even though it's not worded optimally it is potentially useful - how does deletion improve anything? – l4mpi Apr 14 '15 at 15:02
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    @l4mpi When I read the comment I agreed with the not-constructive flag because the wording didn't read constructive, so I deleted it. Comments are considered temporary and can be deleted at any time. If the content of a comment is important enough, then it should be fleshed out and placed into an answer which Ben has now done. – Taryn Apr 14 '15 at 15:07
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    I know that "comments are temporary" mantra, but IMO it's actively harmful. Bad content should be deleted at any time, good (or rather non-bad) content shouldn't, regardless if it's a comment or an answer. Ben wrote an answer after revisiting the post, noticing the deletion, and coming to meta to clarify. In most cases a user wouldn't even notice that the comment is gone, and even if they did, I'm sure most wouldn't proceed to write an answer even if they believe the comment was important. In that case, the information is simply gone, which helps nobody. – l4mpi Apr 14 '15 at 15:34
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    @l4mpi If you don't like the "comments are temporary" mantra, then suggest an alternative solution to the excessive # of comments we get and how to handle them. The direction the mods follow on comment flags is to not put too much time and effort into deciding whether or not to delete them. As I've repeatedly said, I read the comment didn't think it was the most constructive so I deleted it. Feel free to come up with a feature-request on how moderators should handle these situations differently or how else we should handle comments in general. – Taryn Apr 14 '15 at 15:50
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    Agreed; @l4mpi: it's more constructive for you to come up with an alternative solution (I've laid out the problem here and here), than it is to spend every thread where a moderator deletes a comment complaining that you don't like that we delete comments. If you want us to change how we handle comments, give us something to work with; not just complaints. – George Stocker Apr 14 '15 at 16:43
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    @l4mpi The issue I had with that comment is that it came across as snarky and unclear, all at the same time. If you take the time to post a well-written answer and someone comes along as TL;DR blahblahblah, as the author or visitor I'd flag it as 'not constructive' because it isn't constructive. How you say something is as important as what you say. If it bothers you that we moderate based on tone and behavior, then you're going to have a really tough time on Stack Overflow. We're different than internet forums because we moderate more stringently than they do. – George Stocker Apr 14 '15 at 16:46
  • I think it was a minor moderator error. Minor moderator errors are totally expected on Stack Overflow. It is a sensible policy to devote little time to evaluating comments. Nothing to see here. Let's move on. – usr Apr 14 '15 at 17:38
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    @George it bothers me that you see TL;DR and think of it as "snarky" or don't like its tone. Of course it can be used snarkily, but I personally often use it simply when summarizing a post (as in "if that was tldr, here's a summary"). I did not find it snarky or rude here as nothing else in the comment is in any way rude. As for comment handling in general, I think (non-offensive) comments are a far smaller problem than they're said to be in most cases. Even in the linked post you mostly argue why they're problematic in long threads (which I agree with) but also say those are very rare... – l4mpi Apr 14 '15 at 18:20
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    @bluefeet: I did, 3 years ago, make such a feature request, with the goal of allowing the poster to clean up / reword / expand into answer his own content, and let the moderator exercise the nuclear option (deletion) if the user fails to act. Had great support from the community and several moderators. But so far, it appears no action has been taken on it. Another approach would be to tell the comment author when his post has been flagged so he can try to fix the situation before a moderator gets involved. – Ben Voigt Apr 14 '15 at 20:57
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    Of all possible options, just "disappearing" the content is the worst. – Ben Voigt Apr 14 '15 at 20:58
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    @bluefeet Would you have deleted the comment if it did not have the "TL;DR" at the beginning? – Reto Koradi Apr 14 '15 at 21:14
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Basically it provided a different perspective, pointing out one small fact that had been omitted from an otherwise very comprehensive answer.

In that case it should have either been:

  1. Edited into the answer to make it complete.
  2. Added as a new answer - but only if it was sufficiently different/detailed to warrant this.
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    And if I want to offer the author of the current answer the opportunity to do that, rather than hijacking his post or writing an entire new answer concerning what could have been a small addition? Honestly, flagging a comment from a high rep user probably should be allowed in isolation, only if there's been a reply (not necessarily from the flagger, that way anonymity is preserved) giving the commenter some sort of feedback that the comment needs improvement. – Ben Voigt Apr 14 '15 at 21:01

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