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This question already has an answer here:

I recently encountered a question that I feel could be relevant to a large audience, but has an unfortunately vague title. I thought of a more specific title and I hastily changed it.

However, I am thinking about rolling back the change as the answer has not been accepted. I am sure that the change to the title better reflects the authors intent, but since there is not an accepted answer there is a smidgeon of doubt in my mind that I did the wrong thing.

Was I wrong to edit the title, does the community already have a consensus on this situation?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Code Lღver, Anthon, Infinite Recursion, philant Apr 9 '15 at 12:00

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    Without knowing the specific situation, this is impossible to answer. There are certainly times when editing the title is appropriate, and there are also definitely times when it is not. There is no definitive "you should edit the title in this situation" answer. However, "hastily" doing anything here is almost always a bad idea. You should carefully consider rather than rushing to do anything, as your changes can affect the reputation of others (sometimes negatively) by attracting votes. – Ken White Apr 9 '15 at 3:04
  • In regards to the specific question and attracting voters; that is a point I completely agree with. It is also why I did not link the question specifically, I don't want it to get the meta effect. I am looking for a more general opinion on this topic rather than "was my particular edit correct". – robbmj Apr 9 '15 at 4:09
  • I would change the title of this question to: "When is it appropriate to change the title of a question?" – rghome Apr 9 '15 at 8:24
  • possible duplicate of Is it OK to edit the question to change the author's intention "The relevant guidelines here - the ones spelled out on the full editing page - are simple..." – gnat Apr 9 '15 at 9:22
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In general, edits that improve the quality of the question for the community, and not necessarily just the author, are encouraged. This includes editing titles to better reflect the question. Obviously you should take care to ensure your edits do actually improve the quality of the question, and avoid making changes "hastily." Also, try to avoid making edits that shape the question to your answer, rather than to the question.

However, I am thinking about rolling back the change as the answer has not been accepted. I am sure that the change to the title better reflects the authors intent, but since there is not an accepted answer there is a smidgeon of doubt in my mind that I did the wrong thing.

I wouldn't think too much of this. Sometimes people will wait for other answers, often they will wait until they can verify an answer before accepting it (which can sometimes take a while), and sometimes people simply forget to accept an answer.

Also, if the OP feels that your edits harm the question, they certainly have the power to change it themselves. If the OP does not do so, I would tend to think the OP has accepted your edits as improvements.


I took the liberty of looking through some of your recent edits on questions that fit your description. Both of your title edits from the last couple of weeks are edits I would consider improvements. Also, if it's the more-recent one you are referring to, the user has not been online since you edited the title. Have patience, they may yet accept your answer or give feedback on your edits.

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I find many question titles badly written and in poor English. English is not everyone's first language, and even for native English speakers, proficiency at crafting a well formed English sentence is a skill that many I.T. people are slow to acquire.

If it is clear what someone is trying to say, but it seems that they are having trouble in saying it, I think it is appropriate to help them out and edit the title, as long as the meaning of the question is preserved.

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    Lack of skill crafting a brief but descriptive and interesting title (or full text) is doubtlessly not restricted to IT workers... – Deduplicator Apr 9 '15 at 9:59
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It is always appropriate if the OP uses upper case characters for words that normally only get it at the beginning of a sentence.

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