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I would like to start a discussion on introducing a "meta-review" queue. The basic idea would be that after a finished review in any queue, there is an option to challenge the result.

This could be similar to the concept of flagging: in the newly-created queue, high-reputation users would be presented the review and vote Looks ok or I don’t agree or similar.

In addition to being able to (somewhat) democratically detect reviews that went wrong, this queue could generate interesting data/results, e.g.:

  • better positive reviews suitable for audits; and
  • a record on potentially wrong decisions that could help to identify poor reviewers.

The rationale behind this idea

There are a lot of issues here at Stack Overflow that need reviewing. To make reviewing feasible, a majority vote of a small number of people decides.

While this makes perfect sense, due to the low number of voters, this procedure can lead to decisions that do not reflect the opinion of the whole community.

One possible approach to tackle that is to increase the number of people judging controversial reviews. I would argue that the idea of a meta-review queue would solve that with a moderate amount of additional reviewing needed.

  • If this is needed wouldn't it be better to increase the number of reviewers needed per review? I'm not sure I understand even after your rationale which problem you want to solve. What will improve and which current examples support your point. – rene Mar 31 '15 at 7:13
  • @rene wouldn't it be better to increase the number of reviewers needed per review - absolutely. But this comes with the risk that the queues might grow too fast. The overall idea is to minimize the number of reviews where the majority vote diverges from the opinion of the community, without stuffing the queues. – cel Mar 31 '15 at 7:17
  • Ok, now I really need an example of a review where the vote diverged from the opinion of the communtity because if those 3 or 5 reviewers that diverged aren't part of the community I wonder who they are. – rene Mar 31 '15 at 7:20
  • @rene, Of course they're part of the community. But the majority vote of 3-5 randomly selected members is not necessarily the same as the majority vote of all members. If it were, we would not need expensive stuff like elections, but elect the next president by asking you, me and some of our friends. The idea is the same as in my linked discussion: Reviews can go wrong, and I feel that it could make sense to tackle that better. – cel Mar 31 '15 at 7:25
  • @rene Roboreviewers. This could be a great way to stop them. As long as we don't get roboreviewers in this queue. – Scimonster Mar 31 '15 at 7:41
  • 1
    Who gets to challenge the results? And how are "controversial" results discovered? – jonrsharpe Mar 31 '15 at 7:51
  • @jonrsharpe, good question. I think it makes sense to give the option to challenge in the review link, once the review is completed. One could also think about declaring reviews that aggregated a lot of different opinions as controversial. – cel Mar 31 '15 at 8:00
  • But then how do we make sure the "correct" reviews get found? It seems likely that the original author and anyone who voted against the "winning" result would almost always challenge the review, creating a huge amount of extra work. One simpler fix would be to require some ratio (e.g. min(3, 2x+1) for to x against) of votes one way to another, so reviews that are close will stay in the queue until there's a definitive answer. – jonrsharpe Mar 31 '15 at 8:03
  • @jonrsharpe It seems likely that the original author and anyone who voted against the "winning" result would almost always challenge the review, creating a huge amount of extra work. - I am not so sure about that. If designed similar to flagging, users could accumulate declined flags for pushing clearly correct reviews in this particular queue. – cel Mar 31 '15 at 8:16
  • But they already think it isn't a correct review, otherwise they wouldn't have voted the other way in the first place. The very nature of this functionality means that, if properly designed, the "clearly correct" reviews won't be relevant. The original author might take the hint, but if they're posting bad content to begin with an extra flag might not concern them much. – jonrsharpe Mar 31 '15 at 8:26
  • @jonrsharpe, in this case reviewers at least get the feedback that the community probably does not agree with certain decisions. Of course you cannot force people to rethink their behavior. But you can at least try to identify those reviewers and temporarily ban them from reviewing, when too many of their decisions are deemed poor decisions. – cel Mar 31 '15 at 8:33
7

Your idea is flawed.

There is no need for a queue to challenge the result. All review descisions made by community members are public and can be scrutinized at any moment in time, either by leaving comments, vote to reopen, vote to undelete, edit, flagging a post for a moderator, organize a squad in chat and/or post on meta about any doubtful actions.

To make reviewing feasible, a majority vote of a small number of people decides. While this makes perfect sense, due to the low number of voters, this procedure can lead to decisions that do not reflect the opinion of the whole community.

Even the most unpopular review queue, the close vote queue, still attracts 2000 voters per day. That might not be enough in your terms to reflect the opinion of the whole community but what amount of reviewers will do by your standards, given that we have the following number of users per reputation category:

All       >10000   >3000    >500
4090800     7155   19974  104930

What will be the number of voters on reviews needed to satisfy democracy?

I'm not going to touch the issue of the reviews of the meta-reviews because to much meta to handle.

Let's assume this queue is implemented. What happens if I vote 'not OK' to a review? Is it send-back to the queue to be reviewed again by a robo-reviewer? Is the user mod-messaged? Suspended? Banned?

I've run another query to see how many items are up for that queue:

#disagreement name
99279         Close Votes
146388        First Post
954           Helper
40959         Late Answer
47511         Low Quality Posts
7400          Reopen Vote
164614        Suggested Edit
15267         Triage

This are the number of reviews where there wasn't mutual agreement among the reviewers. That would not be a small queue and would drain resources and not scale well.

And then my last major objection I have.
This queue will, in contrast to the other queues, review users behaviour. We already see drama when the community takes a decision on a post that is not shared by some members. I don't want to review users behaviour with a click of a mouse. For this purpose we have elected moderators, who have the tools, experience, and mental coaching required to deal with this.

  • Note, that the number of overall voters is not the point here. The problem is that you are choosing small groups of reviewers. That's just statistics. If you have a certain amount of bad reviewers and only choose very small sample size, you will by chance form a number groups that have a majority of bad reviewers. So what happens if a review is not ok? One possibility is: system would note the voters than were deemed wrong and pushes the question back into the review queue. By a second review one would hope that you will not again pool a group of 5 bad reviewers. – cel Mar 31 '15 at 9:07
  • If hope to get a better result is the criteria I guess we are lost... – rene Mar 31 '15 at 9:10
  • IMO, you don't really review the behavior, but try to correct bad decisions. The primary goal is to reduce the number of bad reviews. I don't want to introduce a punishment queue. However, I do think it makes sense to identify people who frequently make questionable decisions. – cel Mar 31 '15 at 9:10
  • I'm not sure if I follow how correcting a bad desision is not reviewing behaviour... – rene Mar 31 '15 at 9:12
  • in the end this process should do a similar thing than increasing the number of reviewers. And I would argue that this would improve the results (open to debate, but I guess this assumption is not absurd). But hopefully without binding reviewers time on questions that are not controversial, and therefore probably do not benefit from more votes. – cel Mar 31 '15 at 9:15
  • I would agree that it can be considered reviewing behavior if voting against them would result in a direct punishment. I myself e.g. don't feel judged when a mod decides to decline one of my flags. I guess we all make wrong decisions from time to time. There's no judging, no punishment, just a note that this might have been an incorrect decision. Fair enough. – cel Mar 31 '15 at 9:20
  • @rene "All review descisions made by community members are public and can be scrutinized at any moment in time" -- how do you find a specific question in the review queue? – JMM Apr 16 '15 at 13:18
  • @JMM you can use SEDE and 10K-ers have access to all reviews in all queues from the history tab – rene Apr 16 '15 at 13:45
  • @rene great, thanks for the reply. I didn't even know SEDE existed. Now I just have to figure out how to use it... – JMM Apr 16 '15 at 14:17
  • @JMM have a look at this post for the schema and searching for sede on mse gives a lot of questions and answers, some with sample queries – rene Apr 16 '15 at 14:20
  • @rene awesome, thank you, I'll check that out. I thought SELECT Id FROM Posts WHERE Id = 123 (where 123 is a question ID) would at least get me a row, but I guess I misunderstand something basic. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction. – JMM Apr 16 '15 at 14:24
  • Deleted posts are not in SEDE but 123 exists for me: data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/301979 – rene Apr 16 '15 at 14:28
  • @rene oh, I'm sorry, I didn't explain that well. I meant where 123 is a placeholder for the question ID (which isn't deleted). – JMM Apr 16 '15 at 14:29
  • @rene if you're interested, this is the query that returns nothing: data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/301995 and this is the question I'm trying to get data about: stackoverflow.com/questions/29653204/… – JMM Apr 16 '15 at 14:37
  • SEDE is not live, it is updated weekly, in sunday or Monday around 03:00 UTC – rene Apr 16 '15 at 14:39

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