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There was a recent hubbub over the suspension of a user in good standing over some post deletions. The details are not important, but he posted the moderator message he received alongside the ban.

According to that user's screen shot, it reads thusly:

enter image description here

It seems easy for a user to interpret this as a hostility, and become angry, especially when they aren't even aware they have done anything wrong.

Note that there is no invitation to enter an actual dialogue with the moderator other than the "further questions" line (which is a meaningless polite phrase in probably all cultures around the world.)

Also, the possibility of lifting the ban isn't even mentioned.

Exaggerating a bit, the message sounds like a cop gleefully telling you you have been punished and that if you don't like it, you can fill out a complaint form (which will be dutifully received and then thrown away).

This should be changed to sound more friendly and actually interested in the recipient's point of view (which in my experience moderators usually are).

  • Good-faith users will feel less slapped in the face
  • Bad-faith users are going to respond to the message anyway, no matter how you word it.

One suggestion: after the first paragraph:

To avoid further deletions (which take a lot of effort for us to repair) while I reach out to you, the system has placed your account in a timed suspension for 7 days. This is an automatic step when vandalism is suspected. At the end of this timed suspension, your reputation score will be restored and your account will resume as normal.

If you feel you have an exceptional reason to remove this content, your suspension should be lifted, or there was some other misunderstanding, please do not hesitate to contact me through (this link) to discuss the matter, or contact Stack Exchange directly through the 'contact us' link at the bottom of the site.

Regards

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    I should note that an external link is not needed in order for someone to respond. Anyone can provide a reply to a moderator message on the site, even when suspended. If a moderator responds to that, they can write another reply. Perhaps this could be made clearer in the message, but I thought it was very visible in the interface right below the message when you read it. – Brad Larson Mar 18 '15 at 0:37
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    Actually, now that I look at it, I think the confusion here might stem from the fact that this user got this as an email notification first. On the site, there's a reply form right below the message, but you wouldn't see that if you read the text in an email. That's what the "please respond on Stack Overflow here" is referencing, so maybe that last sentence could be made clearer. – Brad Larson Mar 18 '15 at 0:39
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    Personally I find the message to be straightforward and polite. What do you think is hostile about it? – Radiodef Mar 18 '15 at 2:41
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    I thought it was polite. – Matthew Moisen Mar 18 '15 at 2:47
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    It's supposed to be polite, but Pekka's right - a lot of little signals read as at least perfunctory: "Please note" doesn't usually precede words that make me feel respected. And it's easy to read it as "the suspension is necessary to control your currently crazy behavior," vs. something closer to "while we determine what's happening". I like a bunch of the suggestions here, and others are already discussing some changes. – Jaydles Mar 18 '15 at 3:18
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    May I suggest that If you feel you have an exceptional reason to remove this content, your suspension should be lifted, or there was some other misunderstanding, please … can lead to a misreading; I suggest a couple of extra words in there, such as: If you feel you have an exceptional reason to remove this content, or if you think your suspension should be lifted, or if there was some other misunderstanding, please … – Jonathan Leffler Mar 18 '15 at 3:24
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    I'm having trouble finding anything in that email offensive. – canon Mar 18 '15 at 14:08
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    @Pekka I 100% agree with you and I like your edits. – Aaria Carter-Weir Mar 18 '15 at 14:17
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    There's almost nothing in that message that makes the moderator sound like a jerk. Are we all little princesses that need to have every word spoken to us in the utmost kindest way possible? Yeesh. – Keith Mar 18 '15 at 14:18
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    Based on the thousands of user responses to messages I've seen over the years, the one thing most people react badly to is the mod message + suspension itself. Not any of the wording in the email, but the simple fact that they were called out for doing something perceived as wrong. – BoltClock Mar 18 '15 at 14:43
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    @BoltClock People respond similarly to simple downvotes/negative comments. I can't imagine the hornet's nest an actual email stirs up – BradleyDotNET Mar 18 '15 at 22:37
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    I would react badly to an unwarranted suspension, too. – Pekka 웃 Mar 18 '15 at 22:38
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    @Pekka웃 If someone was deleting upvoted answers in a systematic fashion I wouldn't class that as "unwarranted". Personally I don't see a problem with the wording, it sounds quite official but then it should and exceptions shouldn't be made. – Lankymart Mar 19 '15 at 10:16
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    Am I missing something here? The message is polite. – Robinson Mar 19 '15 at 11:26
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    If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious. If you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind. - Oscar Wilde. IOW, no amount of changing the language will help if someone wants to rage quit. – paqogomez Mar 19 '15 at 16:25
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As I mentioned in my answer over yonder,

[this message] hits some sour notes, which isn't particularly great when someone actually is rage-quitting and certainly counter-productive when used in cases where the recipient isn't.

There are some messages that have to be rather scolding, situations where mods have to make it abundantly clear that there are only two choices: stop or leave.

This... isn't really one of those. If someone posts nothing but crap and decides one day to delete it all, you don't really want to discourage them from continuing to do so; if they're posting useful stuff, you don't really want them to leave. The goal here should be to carefully outline the problems inherent in deleting potentially-useful posts, and start a dialog between the user and the moderator that can resolve the issue - ideally without suspension at all, but with suspension as a malleable state if necessary.

I like your suggestions. Robert Cartaino had one I liked a lot as well:

I have placed your account on hold while I reach out to you to avoid any further misunderstandings...

With these in mind, I've re-written the template slightly:

You have recently removed or defaced a lot of content from your posts. Please note that once you post a question or answer to this site, those posts become part of the collective efforts of others who have also contributed to that content. Posts that are potentially useful to others should not be removed except under extraordinary circumstances. Even if the post is no longer useful to the original author, that information is still beneficial to others who may run into similar problems in the future - this is the underlying philosophy of Stack Exchange.

Extensive deletions take a lot of effort to repair. I have placed your account on hold while I reach out to you to avoid any further misunderstandings. Once this matter has been resolved, your reputation score will be restored and your account will resume as normal.

Please respond to this message. I sincerely hope this is just a misunderstanding, but if you feel you have an exceptional reason to remove this content then let me know. If you'd prefer, you can contact Stack Exchange directly through the 'contact us' link at the bottom of the site.

This updated template is now available to moderators, and comes with a default suspension of 1 day; moderators are, as always, free to remove or lengthen this as the situation warrants.

  • Does that last sentence imply that moderators can handle user deletion requests now if they choose not to use the contact form? – BoltClock Mar 18 '15 at 3:51
  • Well, technically moderators have always been able to handle such requests - we just encourage them not to because it can (and often does) lead to too many cooks in the proverbial kitchen (internally, we have a queue for these that mostly avoids that). But, uh, no, that wasn't what I was trying to say. – Shog9 Mar 18 '15 at 4:50
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    @Shog9 I'm wondering a bit if a default suspension for this template is a good idea. If it is a user I want to keep on the site, I try to avoid suspension as long as I still have hope of the user changing their mind, even if I have to clean up a few more posts. The rate limiting that already exist should be able to limit the damage while you give the user a bit of time to respond before suspending. There are certainly cases where I would immediately suspend, but they usually are even more blatant rage-quits with obscenities and all that stuff. – Mad Scientist Mar 18 '15 at 6:55
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    @MadScientist - perhaps it should be a 24 or 48 hour suspension rather than 7 days. – ChrisF Mar 18 '15 at 11:13
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    Please respond to this message - Might wanna change that as the email footer states that the mailbox is unmonitored. – ElGavilan Mar 18 '15 at 13:47
  • Has it (ever) happened that someone else took over (maybe only for a short time), leading to such a mod-action? If so, should that possibility be mentioned? – Deduplicator Mar 18 '15 at 22:26
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    Yes, @dedup - including cases where "someone else" was "drunk version of author". Don't think we need to explicitly call those out though. – Shog9 Mar 18 '15 at 23:48
  • Shows up on-site too, @ElG - and there's a link in the email. – Shog9 Mar 18 '15 at 23:49
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    "The goal here should be to carefully outline the problems inherent in deleting potentially-useful posts" - Yes, and like the OP I'd suggest a message that essentially says "once you post it, it belongs to us" isn't the best way to do that. If that's an accurate reflection of SE's current sentiment, then the UI should not allow the user to delete the content in the first place. If it's not, then the message really needs to be changed. And as long as the UI does allow deletions, it's generally inappropriate to scold a user for deleting stuff. – aroth Mar 19 '15 at 11:11
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As someone with moderation experience in various forums, I can say that you need to be firm with users about what they can and can't do, but moderators also need to be open.

As it currently is written, the message's point is that the user's been badly behaved and they're being punished for it.

however

It's a very different situation if the user feels they never earned the suspension in the first place, and can easily be demotivating. For this reason I agree to a slight change, but not a total re-write of the message.

For example if a highly-active user was suspended, both the message and suspension itself could potentially be enough to send the user packing (in the sense that they won't post again).

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    This is just my opinion as a non-moderator, but I think playing "tough guy" as a moderator might encourage a whack-a-mole situation with trolls or disgruntled users (in a free-to-register site), while throwing away the chance for a constructive criticism towards good-willed users and coming off as a despot to bystanders. – Camilo Martin Mar 19 '15 at 7:43

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