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Community behaviour vs. the Community Rules. In my experience the two are quite often not in alignment. Of course, one case where this happens is when new members post off-topic questions. But my concern here is with cases whereby experienced members decide certain questions are off-topic, just because it is their intuition that they are. Well, suppose their intuition is contradicted by the Community Rules (https://stackoverflow.com/help/on-topic) ... Are the rules enforceable in any way? (If not, as I suspect is the case, then maybe the rules should change so that they reflect the reality of the community's intuitions.)

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  • I assume this is the question you are talking about:stackoverflow.com/questions/28909201/… – John Palmer Mar 12 '15 at 21:17
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    The question is incredibly easy to misunderstand. I had to read it thrice to understand that you're not asking about how to attain a good search engine ranking. However, API questions are generally off topic, as well. – Pekka Mar 12 '15 at 21:20
  • I prefer to address my concerns about this specific question elsewhere. Here, I am addressing the general issue. – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 21:20
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    'Are the rules enforceable in any way?' sure. You could hold the close-voters at gunpoint, blackmail them or threaten their family memb... oh... you mean legally? – Martin James Mar 12 '15 at 21:20
  • @MartinJames None of the above of course. I mean within the framework of StackOverflow procedures. – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 21:22
  • @Pekka웃 The only meaningful way to ask this questions is without a specific example, because then you 'll get replies that try to figure out if the specific example is off-topic or not, making these replies off-topic. The question is about some question X that follows the community rules but has been considered off-topic by the community. – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 21:25
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    Yeah, fair enough. Wrote an answer. – Pekka Mar 12 '15 at 21:30
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    The system is already heavily biased towards the questioner. It doesn't stop him from posting an off-topic question and he is 500% more powerful than any other SO user to claim his question is on-topic. If that is not enough then, well, does it really need to be 1000%? Where does this stop? – Hans Passant Mar 12 '15 at 21:35
  • @HansPassant Why not at stackoverflow.com/help/on-topic ? Rules are meant to be followed. But, on the other hand rules are there to be changed, updated, clarified. If it seems that senior knowledgeable community members do not seem to follow the rules, but think they are, it maybe because the rules need to change. It may be the case that the community is better served this way. But, at the end of the day the rules should be easily understood by both newcomers who bother to read them and by old-timers who also bother to re-read them once in a while. Otherwise time is wasted! – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 21:54
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    @MiltosKokkonidis Be careful with the accusation you are making. The community members may very well be following the rules (though the close reason itself was bogus in this case). A good approach is to ask on meta with: "Why was this question not following the rules?" and see what people say. – BradleyDotNET Mar 12 '15 at 22:01
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    @Gert - I could dispatch a lot of crap in a hurry if I had hammer rights for off-topic votes. But no, all those gold badges and all that rep still makes me 500% less than any confuzzled newbie. I'm not complaining, frankly no idea why the OP thinks he needs to. Maybe he just can't handle that 500 horsepower chainsaw. Always easier to blame somebody else when it cuts his leg off. – Hans Passant Mar 12 '15 at 22:02
  • @BradleyDotNET Please read this question very carefully before accusing me of accusing anyone.This is a generic question and very intentionally avoided mentioning the question I had an issue with because I thought whether that question was off-topic or not was a topic for a different discussion. – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:11
  • As Josh mentioned in his comment, in this meta question you are accusing them: "But my concern here is with the behaviour of experienced members who decide certain questions are off-topic, just because it is their intuition that they are. Well, suppose their intuition is contradicted by the Community Rules" Thats a pretty strong implication that acted contrary to the rules. – BradleyDotNET Mar 12 '15 at 22:17
  • @BradleyDotNET Let me repeat myself here. This is actually part of the hypothesis behind the question: assume there is a question X and experience members Y1 ... Y5 think in their gut it is off-topic. Suppose that then you check the rules and see the rules say it is on-topic. If you do not make this assumption there is no question to ask. The question "what do you do if you have an off-topic question that was closed as off-topic" would be pointless, don't you agree? – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:22
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    True enough, I'm just saying this comes off a bit on the accusatory side. Its no big deal here, just something to keep in mind. – BradleyDotNET Mar 12 '15 at 22:32
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By and large, the best way is to take it to Meta, as you have done here. An interesting post going the other way (from a diamond moderator no less!): How to assert a bad question

So you've done the right thing here. Flagging will invariably result in a decline unless its totally egregious, as diamond mods are (correctly) hesitant to override 5 community members votes.

You could also take up your cause in chat before coming to Meta to get some other community members opinions. The SO Tavern or your language chat room are both good choices.

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  • I like this answer and would probably accept it but I maintain that the last part of it is 100% irrelevant to the question I am asking. – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:20
  • @MiltosKokkonidis I can edit it out if you like, just trying to kill two birds with one answer :) – BradleyDotNET Mar 12 '15 at 22:32
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    First stop meta? Rather first stop introspection and clarifying edit, or/and maybe a comment. Only escalate if the basic tools proove insufficient, and you are reasonably sure you have done due dilligence. – Deduplicator Mar 12 '15 at 22:37
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    @Deduplicator OK, you are right, these are the first steps even in this question, but I accepted this answer because I kind of took it for granted that you 'd do these things first. But, again, you are right. – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:50
  • @Deduplicator Yes, I assumed there is a fundamental disagreement as to whether or not the spirit of a question is "against the rules". Editing is preferred, but would not have fixed the problem with the OPs question. – BradleyDotNET Mar 12 '15 at 23:06
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The first thing to do when you're being misunderstood, here or face-to-face, is to not assume malice. Immediately after that, figure out why your communication is not being recieved as you expect. Then try to remedy it.

Here, that means editing. And it doesn't mean adding a diatribe about the rules to your technical question. It means revising the technical part to clear up the misunderstanding.

The edit I just made removed a bunch of obfuscating material. If you don't like it, feel free to roll it back, but I offer it as an example of the kind of edit that might help resolve miscommunication.

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  • That's a good edit – Pekka Mar 12 '15 at 21:35
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    I didn't assume malice. But my question here is generic and independent from my actual question and its story that triggered this one. The edits are welcome though :-) – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 21:38
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    @Miltos, my answer is generic as well. Perhaps not "malice", but you certainly imply that you think the closers have behaved improperly. – jscs Mar 12 '15 at 21:39
  • I could not ever have possibly implied this given that I never mentioned the question whose story gave birth to this one. There are two matters that I separatevery clearly in my mind: 1. whether a question I asked happens to be off-topic or not and 2. what happens if an on-topic question is thought by members to be off-topic. Here, I am seeking answers to the latter question. – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:07
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    I'm not talking about your SO question, I'm talking about the language in this Meta question, @MiltosKokkonidis. "my concern here is with the behaviour of experienced members who decide certain questions are off-topic, just because it is their intuition that they are. Well, suppose their intuition is contradicted by the Community Rules" You're directly saying these members are not following the rules. The implication is that this is wrong. But if you don't start with the assumption that they're rulebreakers, you might get farther, faster. – jscs Mar 12 '15 at 22:08
  • @JoshCaswell I see why you thought that. But this is actually part of the hypothesis behind the question: assume there is a question X and experience members Y1 ... Y5 think in their gut it is off-topic. Suppose that then you check the rules and see the rules say it is on-topic. If you do not make this assumption there is no question to ask. The question "what do you do if you have an off-topic question that was closed as off-topic" would be pointless, right? – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:18
  • Right, @MiltosKokkonidis, as long as you start with "these five other people are mistaken for some reason", as opposed to "misbehaving". – jscs Mar 12 '15 at 22:26
  • @JoshCaswell I had written a 'thank you note" and was about to edit my question but I then saw I did not use the word "misbehaving" (either that or it is too late at night). – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:47
  • OK, I chose Bradley's answer (but also agree with a comment that adds to it). It's late and I think I had all the discussion I can take. Cheers :-) – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 23:01
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    @MiltosKokkonidis if you say you didn't intend to say that the hypothetical closers were acting badly, then I happily believe you. I'm just telling you how I and probably others read this. – jscs Mar 12 '15 at 23:38
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If your question gets closed, and you think it is in error, take it here to Meta.

State your case here; be clear and use details.

Not unlike in any court in the real world, it is best to remain calm. Even if you feel you have been treated unfairly and are understandably angry, try to keep the tone as neutral and factual as possible. It is rarely a good idea to rant too much. (Not saying you have, at all. Just as a general rule.)

Make sure to choose a good question title. "Why did SO mod nazis close my great question?????????" is likely not to get you anywhere even if you have a point.

Something like "I feel my question about xyz was closed in error" or "Why was this question closed about Google closed as off topic?" is more likely to work.

If you have a valid case, Meta scrutiny will help your question get reopened in most cases.

Good luck!

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  • Well I haven't seen any "SO nazis", just members who try to do their best to keep SO at a certain standard and with a certain scope. Sometimes, I hope it would be broader, but that's another discussion. – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:00
  • @Miltos thanks! :) I wasn't trying to insinuate you had put it that way. – Pekka Mar 12 '15 at 22:23
  • No worries and thanks once again for the answer :-) – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:26
  • I eventually accepted Bradley's answer because I thought it was a bit more complete, but I thank your for yours too. – Miltos Kokkonidis Mar 12 '15 at 22:52

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