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Sometimes I ask questions related to the standard-setting process.

E.g:

  1. StackOverflow: What's the current status of JS/ES proposals on date literals?
  2. Programmers: Why was Array.contains renamed to includes if MooTools issue seems trivially resolvable?

Those questions get closed as opinion-based, but I don't understand why.

The definition of close reason is:

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.

But I am not interested in those kinds of answers.
I would expect to see more formal answers instead:

  1. "It was discussed there and there, and accepted/rejected because of the following things" (with links to the official discussion and not random opinions)
  2. "It is unknown -- there is no public record"
  3. "It is unknown, but here is a formal technical reason why it wouldn't have worked as proposed"

I don't see why either of those answers is opinion-based.

2

You're asking people to guess at why they think someone else made a particular decision. That is an opinion. If you want to know why some particular library/language designers made a decision that they did then ask them (assuming they provide some means of being contacted) rather than asking us to guess at why they might have done something.

  • I am not interested in guesses though. The decision process is a hugely public process that is followed by a lot of people -- what I want is a summary of choice without having to read all minutes from all the possible discussions, because some people already read it anyway. – Andrey Shchekin Mar 4 '15 at 22:41
  • I could ask the authors, but then one could argue any question about a library/framework could go to the authors, and any question about the technology to the forum on that technology -- but that is not what SO is about (as I understand it). – Andrey Shchekin Mar 4 '15 at 22:46
  • 1
    @AndreyShchekin SO is about answering specific, answerable, high quality programming problems. This is a question that can only be answered by those language/library designers. The audience here cannot answer why they made a particular decision. The only place you can find out why the designers made a decision is to ask them. For other types of programming problems that don't require being the designer to answer, they can have a place here on SO. The fact that certain questions don't belong here doesn't by any means mean that no questions belong here. – Servy Mar 5 '15 at 14:53

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