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Is there a process in place for unseating "canonical answers" that duplicates gets referred to?

What I mean - what if my duplicate is better than the original I'm supposedly duplicating?

Should not there be a system whereby, if my duplicate is deemed a quality duplicate to such a degree that it renders the original "not as worthy as me, to be called the canonical answer-source(CAS)" , then we might gently unseat the CAS?

Feelings might get hurt, true.

What thinks the experts of Meta?

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    What do you mean "my duplicate"? The best thing to do would surely be to add to/edit the current canonical answer, rather than create a new one (which has the advantage that all the other duplicate links still point to the correct place). – jonrsharpe Mar 4 '15 at 16:42
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    That process is controlled by Google, not by us. – Hans Passant Mar 4 '15 at 17:02
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Why and how is your dupe better?

  1. Only due to the answers?

    Then just ask for merging.
    The old one is still the master, unless it has no valuable answers.

  2. Only due to the question itself, the older has better answers?

    Then just edit the old one, and consider flagging for merging.

  3. Better question and better answers?

    Ok, just dupe the old one to the new one.
    Consider also flagging for merging.

  4. Neither? Ehm, why are we here...?

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  • I can see merging as a good option – Coffee Mar 4 '15 at 16:50
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If the "canonical" question has no answers of value at all, then it shouldn't be eligible for being a duplicate target in the first place. There needs to be an answer with a positive score for it to be a valid duplicate target (some exceptions apply).

It should also not be marked as a duplicate if it doesn't contain an answer that answers the question. If you feel that none of the answers on the duplicate answer a question closed as a duplicate, it can be reopened.

If both the question and the duplicate have quality content, the questions can be merged; flagging for merger and explaining the situation can take care of that.

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