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In Stack Snippets Sandbox, Pacerier posted an answer to demonstrate that code snippets can be used to do phishing attacks. See his explanation.

For those who don't have 10K, the post says that if you write your password in a text field inside a code snippet, Stack Overflow would censor it converting to <input type=password>. The post includes a code snippet where you can try that, tricking you into entering your credentials.

However, the code snippet has some hidden code (you have to scroll to see it) which sends all text written in the text field to a remote server.

I'm not sure if it needed to be deleted. As l4mpi says,

IMO everybody who falls for this deserves to have their account stolen and/or deleted

But the post was removed by Geoff Dalgas♦, probably to protect gullible users.

Was it the better way? If protecting gullible users is preferred, why are gullible users >10K not protected? Does their reputation make them less gullible? I guess not.

Would editing the post to add a warning be a better idea? But that would clearly conflict with author's intent, because Pacerier wanted to demonstrate the dangers of a phishing attack properly:

A phishing demonstration is not a technological demonstration but a social engineering one. As such, if the demonstration is worded like John's post, bfrohs' post or nhinkle's post, it doesn't demonstrate the dangers of a phishing attack.

Therefore, would it be an invalid edit?

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    I would say that seeing the fact that the post got deleted (with that note), >10k users should automatically already be a bit cautious when checking out the answer. The deletion of the answer should already indicate that it is not very trustable. – Praxis Ashelin Mar 2 '15 at 18:46
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    If an user distrusts a deleted post, he would have probably distrusted a non-deleted post which asks him to write his password. But it seems users gullible enough to write their password should be protected, and I'm not fully convinced those users will distrust a deleted answer. – Oriol Mar 2 '15 at 18:53
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    I agree that anyone falling for this deserves to have his password stolen. I'd vote to undelete if I could. – user2629998 Mar 2 '15 at 19:00
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    "probably to protect gullible users" -- it's also to protect the site from malicious actions taken by the attacker using the compromised accounts (using up all their downvotes and close votes, posting some spam, deleting some posts and then requesting account deletion, for example). (I don't think Pacerier had any malicious intent here, of course.) – Jeffrey Bosboom Mar 2 '15 at 19:02
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    This is a weird example of blaming the user (l4mpi called it "darwinism", which IMO is bad taste.) I don't see why we need a potentially malicious script to be live on the site for the sake of tricking "gullible" users. – user3920237 Mar 2 '15 at 19:11
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    Just edit the code so that the server that get's the passwords is SE's, and have SE automatically send a mod note to the user telling them that they're an idiot and forcing a password reset. Lock the post to prevent someone editing the server gain. – Servy Mar 2 '15 at 19:24
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    @TravisJ That would probably be true if it was reputation in Information Security. But I'm not sure SO reputation and gullibility are highly negatively uncorrelated. – Oriol Mar 2 '15 at 19:46
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    @Oriol - I would assume most users at 10k would understand the mechanics of a simple attack, especially a phishing one as is depicted. But who knows, there is always a Prince in Ghana that needs help wiring his inheritance - maybe some people actually believe that. – Travis J Mar 2 '15 at 19:51
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    Look guys, it works also in comments: *********** - try with yours! – BartoszKP Mar 3 '15 at 14:51
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    Does it work with luggage combinations: 12345 – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Mar 3 '15 at 14:58
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    @BartoszKP hunter2 – Florent Bayle Mar 3 '15 at 15:01
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    @FlorentBayle Probably the system sometimes replaces the stars with viewer's password, for convenience. – BartoszKP Mar 3 '15 at 15:03
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    A lack of technical/security savvy on the part of the victim does not justify anything. I don't understand this thinking, that it's OK to do the wrong thing as long as it's easy to do. Besides, even a savvy person might make the mistake of trusting this site more than they should. – BSMP Mar 3 '15 at 15:04
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    @FlorentBayle Wow, that's crazy, that's the same password I have on my luggage! – neminem Mar 3 '15 at 23:33
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    @AndréDaniel You don't have to give the author the benefit of the doubt. I can tell you with 100% certainty that it did not contain a warning. It went to great lengths to "fool" the reader, and the quote at the end of Oriol's post is the justification that the author gave for not including a warning. I will give the author the benefit of the doubt and assume s/he had very good intentions, but this was not the way to go about it. – JLRishe Mar 4 '15 at 11:50
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Wanting to demonstrate malicious code is not a valid reason for posting malicious code in such a way that it can actually be run. Deletion is certainly warranted. Stack Exchange should not expose users to runnable malicious code. By extension, it should then also be nuked on the back end so that even 10K users aren't exposed to it any more.

That does leave one related question, though. Is there an appropriate way to demonstrate malicious code? I feel that this is a separate question and should be posted as such. To that end, I've gone ahead and posted a question focused on this aspect.

  • Instead of sending it to an external server, it should just print the password back to the user in plain text. "Don't trust random code snippets. I could have stolen your password <yourpassword>" – Stevoisiak supports Monica Aug 4 '17 at 13:06
  • @StevenVascellaro That's all covered in the linked question. – jpmc26 Aug 4 '17 at 15:31
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A phishing demonstration is not a technological demonstration but a social engineering one. As such, if the demonstration is worded like John's post, bfrohs' post or nhinkle's post, it doesn't demonstrate the dangers of a phishing attack.

SO is not a testing ground for performing social engineering experiments. Plenty of intelligent people are capable of understanding a descriptive analysis of a social engineering attack.

Actually trying to trick SO users into becoming victims of an attack is not necessary. If we did allow such approaches, then there'd be a fuzzy line between someone making a bot to occasionally post such posts in an effort to victimize users. This already occurs in forums and mailing lists that don't have good spam protection. How would we say that one post is just malicious spam that should be deleted, and another is someone running a bot that is intended to demonstrate phishing attack?

If the intent is to make the post an authentic attempt at phishing as a method of demonstrating, then an actual malicious post is indistinguishable from an accurate demonstration of one. Therefore IMO we shouldn't allow such posts, as it cripples our ability to diligently eliminate malicious spam.

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The post in question deserves to be more than deleted. The user in question should be banned.

Describing how to technically do a phishing attack is one thing. Even writing the code that demonstrates "if someone typed a password in here, it would be forwarded to another website" is basically the same thing.

Describing, or even engaging in, the psychological aspects of a phishing attack is another thing.

Both of the above, so long as they are separate, are acceptable acts. They can be educational, and useful to describe a problem.

If you put the two steps together in live code, facing the internet, and actually forward the password to an external website, you haven't "demonstrated how phishing works", you have actually done the act of phishing.

Demonstrating how a bullet damages a carcass is one thing.

Demonstrating how easy it is to aim a gun at a person is another (and needs be done with care).

Putting the two together is shooting a person.

Putting the technical part of a phishing attack together with the psychological part, and exposing it to the internet, is actually phishing.

I see no need for the deleted post to remain either. It doesn't provide any real use, and it provides an extremely small amount of danger. But the effort in expunging it might be more than the danger.

  • I'm not sure I agree about the ban. I think the OP intended to create an emotional response in anyone who fell for his post to better illustrate his point, or at least I'd like to believe that. I do not believe the OP ever intended to use any stolen credentials. To continue with your analogy, he was firing rubber bullets. That said, I think it is too difficult to look at a gun and determine if it is loaded with rubber bullets. At the very least the user deserves a firm explanation of why such posts can not be allowed as such and at the most a temporary ban at this time. – user3334690 Mar 5 '15 at 14:46
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    @user334690 He took the data, and forwarded it to a site he controls. What happens at that site, we cannot understand. At best, in the analogy, he fired live bullets at people and said he "chose to miss" in that he didn't take the data phished, and save it: but we cannot even tell if he missed or not! On top of that, his phishing script forwarded the passwords in plain text over the internet (possibly twice, once to SO and once to his website), even if he "chose to miss" his bullets still embedded fragments in the targets. Hence, ban. Maybe let the user create a new profile. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Mar 5 '15 at 15:10
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    We should discourage people from leaving loaded weapons lying around. It's inherently unsafe and does not represent a responsible behavior pattern. – Robert Crovella Mar 5 '15 at 17:04
  • This is a far better answer than mine IMO, and better communicates what I was trying to express. – AaronLS Mar 5 '15 at 19:10
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Are 10k users less gullible? Well, there are some ways that I know of a least to tell what was going on.

Inspecting the deleted answer via edit will yield the website this phishing attempt uses.

test-123.meximas.com

It is a subdomain of meximas.com which means we can do a whois on it to determine the author and see what their intent was

Registrant Name: Kyriakos Kyriako
Registrant Organization: Hostinger International Ltd.
Registrant Street: 61 Lordou Vyronos
Registrant City: Larnaca
Registrant State/Province:
Registrant Postal Code: 6023
Registrant Country: Cyprus
Registrant Phone: +357.24030130
Registrant Phone Ext:
Registrant Fax:
Registrant Fax Ext:
Registrant Email: hostmaster@hostinger.com

Okay so now we have a name, lets search and see if this person has any footprint online, or if the domain is linked to other phishing attempts.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Kyriakos+Kyriako

Literally the first result is "This is why you shouldn't hack" which takes you to a forum post of this exact person "Kyriakos Kyriako" stealing 10 dollars from the person posting the forum. Apparently the phishing attempt came from the domain (note the contact name)

Domain Name: NETNE.NET
Created on: 19-Mar-09
Expires on: 19-Mar-13
Last Updated on: 20-Mar-12
Registrant:
Hostinger International Ltd.
61 Lordou Vyronos
Larnaca, 6023
Cyprus
Administrative Contact:
Kyriako, Kyriakos hostmaster@hostinger.com
Hostinger International Ltd.
61 Lordou Vyronos
Larnaca, 6023
Cyprus
+357.24030130

So, are we less gullible? Who knows. Should this user be banned? Perhaps.

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    Now that's scary. Good investigation. – Oriol Mar 5 '15 at 20:06
  • You know what? Other people's idea that this person should be banned seemed utter bullshit to me (and still do), but what you've shown here makes it a lot more likely that he/she should. It's not really going to change anything (he/she can make another account), but yeah, it's confirmed douchebag material. – Camilo Martin May 30 '15 at 2:20
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If protecting gullible users is preferred, why are gullible users >10K not protected?

10K users are only exposed to the hack because the Snippet remains active in a deleted answer.

It seems reasonable to simply display Stack Snippets in deleted answers as ordinary code blocks (perhaps with some additional flair indicating a snippet, but totally without any mechanism for loading the snippet into the page code -- disabling the run button seems too weak). This allows 10k users to inspect them, without allowing any malicious code to activate. This is already being done for negatively voted answers so it just needs to have deleted answers trigger the same behavior.

Beyond that, while generic code blocks need to preserve whitespace, because some languages depend on it, code in Stack Snippets can be auto-formatted with whitespace reduction. The point of a programming Q&A site is to have people look at and understand the code; hiding it off the side or bottom of the script window does not further any goals of StackOverflow.

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Are 10K users less gullible?

Not necessarily. Being a 10K user or even a 100k user doesn't change the chances of being tricked by phishing.

IMO, what makes you less gullible is learning that not everything is good, there are people who want to steal your login and passwords. I guess 10k users have more experience with these things as they may have seen a lot of fake posts that are spam and/or phishing. However, everyone is exposed to things like phishing if they aren't informed. Being a 10k user doesn't change anything from 9900 rep, you don't suddenly gain a ton of life experience in 100 rep.

This is a very hard question, as this is an individual answer. This person may be tricked, this person will be tricked this person will not and so on. This isn't a topic I will be able to answer with 100% accuracy.

Should it be removed.

Yes. In addition to the millions of people with accounts on SO, there are also people who come here and don't have an account. Coming to SO and finding a post that looks cool (given the answers) and trying a post and end up losing a password is not a good way to handle potential new users. Having a piece of phishing software on SO isn't really a good idea either.

I agree with Yakk:

The post in question deserves to be more than deleted. The user in question should be banned.

Describing how to technically do a phishing attack is one thing. Even writing the code that demonstrates "if someone typed a password in here, it would be forwarded to another website" is basically the same thing.

Describing, or even engaging in, the psychological aspects of a phishing attack is another thing.

Both of the above, so long as they are separate, are acceptable acts. They can be educational, and useful to describe a problem.

If you put the two steps together in live code, facing the internet, and actually forward the password to an external website, you haven't "demonstrated how phishing works", you have actually done the act of phishing.

I don't think anyone has the statistics on how many has run the snippet, and how many of those were tricked into giving up their username and password. The post itself could have been fine, but as Yakk mentions, it is code on the internet that forwards passwords to an external server. Had it left out that part where it forwards it to a server, it could have been fine. But it forwards passwords to an external server, so for all we know it could actually have tricked someone to give up their password.

I'm a 3.2k user at this time, so I can't see the post. However, there is another post that shows a phishing example. But it explains that the credentials inputted has to be fake. I don't know what the other post did, btu I assume it didn't do it.

But to finish off, having live phishing on the site isn't a good idea when it isn't explained that it sends data to an external server. The answer I linked above also sends to an external server, but it tells clearly in red text in the snippet and bold in the answer that the credentials has to be fake as they will be sent to a server in plain text. Telling users to send fake credentials is something else than trying to get them to send their real.

Should the user be banned? Yes. The answer should be removed completely so no one can see it, not even those who can see deleted answers. Having real phishing code on Stack Overflow is not a good idea.

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