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How should I format compiler errors when I want to put them in code?

Should they be in a code section:

dk2.cpp: In function 'int main()':
dk2.cpp:29:28: error: no matching function for call to 'callIfToggled(const bool&, std::vector<bool>::reference, A&)'
dk2.cpp:29:28: note: candidate is:
dk2.cpp:13:6: note: template<class T> void callIfToggled(bool, bool&, T&)

Or in a block quote?

dk2.cpp: In function 'int main()':
dk2.cpp:29:28: error: no matching function for call to 'callIfToggled(const bool&, std::vector::reference, A&)'
dk2.cpp:29:28: note: candidate is:
dk2.cpp:13:6: note: template void callIfToggled(bool, bool&, T&)

Or something else? Note that code sections sometimes try to add syntax highlighting which is wrong since that is a compiler error.

Or should I use <pre></pre>? But what about escape sequences then, it seems I need to escape < and > myself.

As for quotes, they mess-up the lines, and everything becomes a single line unless I go and manually split them into paragraphs.

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    I consider the 1st option much more readable (and often choose to edit so in questions). – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 23 '15 at 11:56
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    If it's a one-line compiler error, the second variant might be more readable, because you don't need to scroll horizontally. But for multiple lines, you're right. – sashoalm Feb 23 '15 at 12:08
  • I recommend the 1st option, that is as a code because it is much easier to read it and is more precise, you can easily identify where a line begins and eds. I always recommend others to post compiler errors as a code. – Arun A S Feb 23 '15 at 14:12
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    The occasional bit of syntax highlighting appearing in error messages is very much preferable to having a variable-spaced font for these messages would be, IMO. – TZHX Feb 23 '15 at 14:57
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    Would it be possible to create a quote style that uses monospace font? I'd prefer that and no scrolling versus a giant scrollbox or a gobbledegook. – Compass Feb 24 '15 at 15:22
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    @Compass It would be good to enable scrolling if the log is multiple lines, however, as they might be aligned in a meaningfull way - for example, table data, and Java uses the ^ to point out an error on the line above - that would break with work-wrap. But for a single line it would be OK to wrap it. – sashoalm Feb 24 '15 at 15:23
103

I'm routinely editing questions (example) to display compiler errors in code blocks but I put

<!-- language: lang-none -->

in front of them to disable misleading syntax highlighting (example). This is just the same way I format output of any program in my posts (example).

In rare cases, if the message is rather long and I wanted to highlight one particular part of it, I might be using <pre> tags manually so I can add some <b> (or whatever) tag inside (example).

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    This is what I do while editing and I think it is probably the best option. – AstroCB Feb 24 '15 at 22:44
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    It would be cool to have a special block for errors which would look e.g. like a block quote, just would not break the words (would be scrollable) and might be in some decent red color (to indicate error on the first sight). But I'm saying it would be cool since the people are not able to use even current blocks correctly. – TLama Feb 26 '15 at 9:45
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At the moment, there are three options, none of them really optimal.

Choose whichever one looks best:

  1. Use a quote-block:

    > This is an error-message &lt;A>.
    

    This is an error-message <A>.

  2. Use a code-block:

        This is an error-message with lots of angle-brackets like this vector<string>
    
    This is an error-message with lots of angle-brackets like this vector<string>
    
  3. Same as option 2, but disable syntax-highlighting as inappropriate:

    <!-- language: none -->
    
        This is an error-message with lots of angle-brackets like this vector<string>
    
    This is an error-message with lots of angle-brackets like this vector<string>
    

I made a feature-request on Meta SE for a better option:

Add format for logs/warnings/error messages which allows word-wrapping and preserves newlines

11

I think putting compiler errors in a code section is the standard, since it generally makes them more readable. Most compilers output error messages that are intended to be read in a fixed-width font, and some (such as gcc) explicitly take advantage of the fixed-width font to vertically align parts of error messages that span multiple lines.

Although using code sections will occasionally result in improper automatic syntax highlighting, they're the best way to display a block of text in fixed-width font on this website. The slight annoyance caused by the syntax highlighting is not nearly as bad as the potential unreadability of error messages displayed in a variable-width font.

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