7

What fonts does stack overflow use? Why were they chosen?

I find that there is often a lot of thought put into things like this, which is why I ask.

14

Let's go meta, on meta. Development tools tell all:

In Chrome

  1. Right click on a word
  2. Click "Inspect element".
  3. Make sure "Show inherited properties" is checked.

Development tools

font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
font-kerning: auto;
font-size: 24px;
font-stretch: normal;
font-style: normal;
font-variant: normal;
font-variant-ligatures: normal;
font-weight: normal;
7

What Evan Carroll said. But this is not easy for a layman. So I suggest an alternative here. There's an extension for Chrome called WhatFont, which makes things easier.

WhatFont

What is the easiest way to find out the fonts used in a webpage? Firebug and Webkit Inspector are easy enough to use for developers. However, for others, this should not be necessary. With this extension, you could inspect web fonts by just hovering on them. It is that simple and elegant.

It also detects the services used for serving the web fonts. Supports Typekit and Google Font API.

Recommended by Wired WebMonkey, Lifehacker, and SwissMiss.

  • 3
    Good thing Stack Overflow is not made for laymen but for professional and enthusiast programmers :-) – Emil Vikström Apr 27 '16 at 12:01
  • @EmilVikström does that imply I should delete the answer? – NVZ Apr 27 '16 at 12:06
  • 2
    Not really, I just disagree with tayloring answers to laymen when visitors to this site are perfectly capable of handling development tools. So I think the other answer is better, that's all! – Emil Vikström Apr 27 '16 at 14:26
  • @EmilVikström I agree the other answer is better suited for the site and that's exactly why I mentioned that in my answer first. But hey, it's always good to have a choice. You have a choice now, either go thru the development stuff or just click the extension. ;) – NVZ Apr 27 '16 at 14:31
  • @NVZ no, your answer is inferior in every way -- imho. But, it's still a valid answer. Let it stay. I even upvoted it. – Evan Carroll May 24 '16 at 16:34
  • 4
    @EvanCarroll Well.. Thanks. Not everyone googling "what fonts do a website use" follow the developer-level steps. I just thought I could help those laymen, not that I am one, btw. :) Also, if you read my earlier comments, you'll know that I already agree mine is inferior. – NVZ May 24 '16 at 16:36

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