6

In this question the question author asks how to document a type of JavaScript method signature.

Rather than answer the question, a commenter decides to argue the point that the entire methodology is unsound. This is not helpful to the question or other readers.

Other than giving a quality answer to the question, what action (if any) should I take?

  • 1
  • 4
    Why isn't it useful? Your own answer makes a similar point about the difficulty of it. Should your answer be removed because it goes against the expectation of the asker? Of course not. Just like those other comments, your answer is also useful. – Stephan Branczyk Feb 13 '15 at 3:42
  • 7
    "This is not helpful to the question or other readers:" One of the main purposes of comments is to question/dispute implicit or explicit assumptions made in the question. For example, this comment. – Sneftel Feb 13 '15 at 10:28
  • 1
    I'd suggest 'just don't do it' isn't a useful answer. But saying 'don't do it because X have you considered Y instead' is a useful answer. – Sobrique Feb 13 '15 at 11:11
  • Comments on the referenced question weren't really that bad. I've seen the behavior before though only much worse and decided to finally ask about it. The discussion has definitely been enlightening. – Chad Killingsworth Feb 13 '15 at 17:22
28

Comments aren't there to answer the question; answers are there to answer the question. That a comment doesn't answer the question is expected.

Providing additional information that readers may find useful, but that is not actually an answer to the question, is a perfectly fine comment. There isn't any action that you need to take. You can upvote the comment if you like it, or reply to it if you wish to add additional information.

I also reject the premise that providing information about potential problems with a methodology used, even if they're not related to the specific problem the question is asking about, is not useful/helpful information, for both the question author and also future visitors. If you think that the information that the user provided is wrong, you're welcome to provide the information you feel is correct.

  • 3
    Correct. More often than not questions highlight serious problems with the questioners approach. While they may be seeking a specific solution to their specific problem, but it's often that their problem is that they're solution's approach is fundamentally flawed. The ultimate goal of SO should be to enable its users to be better software engineers. – Halfstop Feb 12 '15 at 20:54
  • 1
    Maybe worth insisting on the fact that criticism is good if it is constructive criticism. That is, not only pointing what is wrong, but providing some clues on how it's wrong and pointers to other options. In addition, such comments should be written in terms respectful for the OP. – Sylvain Leroux Feb 13 '15 at 10:48
  • Indeed. Explaining why something is a bad idea helps someone move forwards (by rethinking their task, or explaining to their boss). Offering alternatives is even better, because that's how it works in the real world. If you're told 'do X' "no, that's dumb" isn't an answer most bosses will accept... – Sobrique Feb 13 '15 at 11:15
-5

I think such comment (I assume @bhspencer's) is O.K., because comments are not answers. Comment may point something - contain an advice, which doesn't really answer the question, but shows OP different paths, things OP may have missed.

But the problem is deeper. It's common that people will downvote question just because they don't like the approach or topic and then high-rep users will close the questions for all possible artificial reasons. For me this behavior is also really annoying, because it indeed does not help and creates frustration among users.

  • 7
    I resent the assumption that just because you fail to understand why a question is crap, those looking at it and finding it sufficiently lacking to deserve downvotes and closevotes just do it to get their jollies. Sure it's unpleasant to see your work is seen as flawed, but that just means you should improve it. – Deduplicator Feb 12 '15 at 16:36
  • @Deduplicator first of all it's not my question, so I have no reason to feel "unpleasant". Secondly, for me this question is perfectly clear and there's no place for opinion, so I am affraid it's not me who don't understand for what close reasons: "unclear" and "opinion-based" stand for. – doc Feb 12 '15 at 16:50
  • 1
    The question was perfectly clear and to the point. I knew exactly what he was asking. I disagree strongly with the entire methodology behind the question (optional parameters in the middle), but that's entirely beside the point. The question was about the proper JSDoc tags for such a method. And yes, downvoting a question because you don't like the technology or methodology is very unhelpful. – Chad Killingsworth Feb 12 '15 at 18:22
  • @ChadKillingsworth the choice of methodology could even be beyond OP's deciding powers. He might need to provide documentation for someone else's code. – doc Feb 12 '15 at 20:48
  • 1
    @doc That doesn't mean that it's unhelpful to point out the methodological flaw. At least they'll know they're being forced to do something they shouldn't do rather than thinking it's a good idea, and it may be useful information for other readers who aren't in that situation. – Servy Feb 12 '15 at 20:56
  • @Servy have you even read my answer? Pointing out and commenting is O.K. But it's not O.K. to close question for random reason. Moreover, in case of this particular question, methodological flaw is not an issue. OP asks how to document code with optional parameter in the middle - not how to implement such code. It is different domain. So if you see methodological flaw in documenting a code, that's funny. – doc Feb 12 '15 at 21:12
  • * It's common that people will downvote question just because* - It seems to be more common that people make such broad, unfounded statements without any evidence whatsoever to support them, and the vast majority of the time they're absolutely wrong. Please edit your answer to provide actual evidence of that statement, or remove it as a false, inflammatory remark. Don't write such nonsense unless you can prove it's a fact. Prove to use that it's common for people to do this, and for high-end users to close for invalid reasons. If you can't document it, stop saying it, because it's false. – Ken White Feb 12 '15 at 23:17
  • @KenWhite you have evidence in this particular example. Most of such questions get deleted and I am not collecting such questions either, just to proove something on your demand. That's my impression and you should realize that from my perspective your observation is as false as from yours is mine. You can downvote my answer if you don't agree, but please don't pretend to have monopoly for truth nor make an attempt to censor my posts. – doc Feb 12 '15 at 23:34
  • No, I don't. I have your statement that is simply wrong, with no evidence that it is common. Even if it were true on this individual question (which is not the case), that wouldn't make it common. Your opinion should not be stated as a fact, and I don't attempt to censor your post. I attempt to get you to either provide evidence that it's true, or ask you to stop posting false information. Broadcasting non-factual claims because your own questions are closed or deleted for poor quality does not make it common; it simply means you probably ask bad questions. – Ken White Feb 12 '15 at 23:49
  • @KenWhite LOL I had maybe one question, which has been deleted long time ago. So where's your evidence? Where's your proof for your claims Mr.? You are asking me to do what? Resign from work and crawl through the site whole night, to provide evidence (which you will deny anyway, because you have monopoly for truth), before I can share my impressions? Do you know what for discussion tag is? "A tag for questions that may not necessarily have a clear-cut right or wrong answer and are often subjective." Hello. – doc Feb 13 '15 at 0:01
  • Yawn... That's what I thought. You're blowing smoke out your backside. No proof, lots of noise, no value. I can make a similar statement: Everyone I've seen post a broad, false statement today has been unable to back it up with proof that it's true, and unlike you I can provide evidence. – Ken White Feb 13 '15 at 0:37
  • @KenWhite how "false statement" can be proven to be true? If you make an assumption that my statement is false, then it's tautology - not an evidence. – doc Feb 13 '15 at 1:10
  • Um, no. You have it reversed. A statement is always false until it can be proven to be true. I've provided my evidence; I'm through wasting time here. There's no assumption being made; your statement is absolutely false unless you can provide evidence that it is not, and you've refused (repeatedly) to do so, thereby confirming the validity of my statement. – Ken White Feb 13 '15 at 1:28
  • @KenWhite statement must be disproved to say that it is false. Otherwise it's just an assumption. – doc Feb 13 '15 at 17:59
  • 1
    I fully agree with the Op, downvoting something just because you do not agree with the way things are in the question or in the answer is really really annoying. It happened to me at least a couple of time. I believe that if you think you you have something interesting to say, comment;if you think your reply can help the Op better, post an answer. But if you don't agree with my code because you don't like it, downvoting my question or my answer it's pretty useless and maybe a little selfish. Just like this answer: why has it got 3 downvotes? Does it hurts someone ego? – motoDrizzt Feb 15 '15 at 11:47
-9

Flag the comment as "too chatty" or "not constructive" if it's really bad.

  • 13
    ... and also consider that it might contain important information even though it is a tangent. It might not even be as tangential as you think. – Deduplicator Feb 12 '15 at 15:05
  • As Kevin says, flag the comment as stupid. Also, leave a polite note for the commentor, pointing out that the comment is useless "don't do that" comment. (The idea that you can "say anything in comments" is silly. "don't do that" material is the scourge of sites like this, and "don't do that" comments are as utterly annoying and stupid, as "don't do that" answers. – Fattie Feb 15 '15 at 12:07

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .