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I recently stumbled upon a question beginning with the following sentence:

I come from a Ruby on Rails API background, but am currently working on a .NET C# WebAPI. I am familiar with C# and .NET webforms.

It seems at first that this introduces required context, but I am convinced that it's just noise. The only important piece of information is that the code in question is using WebAPI, and this could be stated as a tag and added to the next sentence, not wasting an entire paragraph. On the other hand, someone could say that it helps understand who the OP is—after all they're the primary audience here.

Should I delete such introductions as I would "Thank you" paragraphs?

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    Depends. If the introduction is directly related to their question and could potentially help with proposing a solution suitable for the askers conditions, etc., I'd leave it. (E.g. If someone is familiar or working with certain APIs but unfamiliar with others, you thus know which one to prefer for a solution)
    – Columbo
    Feb 9 '15 at 21:53
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    @Columbo How does any of that information help answer the question (no matter what the question is)? You could tailor the answer to someone with a Ruby on Rails background, but then its not as generally useful. Feb 9 '15 at 21:55
  • @BradleyDotNET Are we talking about general cases or this particular one?
    – Columbo
    Feb 9 '15 at 21:56
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    @BradleyDotNET So if I told you that I have a Java background when misunderstanding aspects of the C programming language, don't you think an answerer would consider that information when conveying certain concepts and would point out pitfalls that Java->C movers had in the past? (Just an arbitrary example.)
    – Columbo
    Feb 9 '15 at 21:58
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    @Columbo I would consider such an answer inferior to one that explained the problem to a general audience. Now, if the question was about converting a Java concept/code to a C one, thats different, but then its obvious he has a Java background :) Feb 9 '15 at 22:02
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    @Columbo Yes, every time. Given the extra information, I might add an "extra" explanation for him at the bottom of the post or in a comment, but thats not required. The bulk of the post should answer the actual question, regardless of OP background though. OT: The "I'm a newbie" introductions are the worst examples of this. It doesn't matter that you are a newbie. Feb 9 '15 at 22:06
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    I'd say keep it in, so long as its short and to the point like that. The purpose of being on this site is to help people. If this shows a place where they need additional explanation or where you can see common mistakes they could make its only a good thing. A more general answer that does not help the OP is a bad answer. Feb 9 '15 at 22:09
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    @GabeSechan An answer being generally applicable/understandable does not make it a bad answer. Helping the (hopefully many!) future visitors of that post is far more important than helping the OP. Feb 9 '15 at 22:11
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    @BradleyDotNET With every fiber of my being disagree. First off, this kind of intro doesn't change the answer, it just changes the detail at which you answer. If anything it makes your answer more helpful by not assuming a baseline level of knowledge in the subject. Secondly, 99% of the questions on this site will never help anyone but the OP so you ought to make the most effort to help the one person you know will be helped by the question. Thirdly, there are times when this type of intro really does help you figure out what the problem is, and thus provides value to it. Feb 9 '15 at 22:14
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    And fourth- deleting stuff like that just because it doesn't make a question the smallest possible is just anal. The deleters are more annoying than the stuff deleted. That also goes to people who feel the need to go deleting thanks and other things- you all need psychological help if it actually bothers you. Feb 9 '15 at 22:15
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    @GabeSechan We'll have to live with disagreeing :) If nothing else, this content should never be at the top of the post, as it takes up the valuable "summary" space on the home/active page. Feb 9 '15 at 22:16
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    @BartekBanachewicz Its accurate. Sorry, but 99% o the problems here are minor variations on problems asked many many times before. We all know this. The odds that any particular question will ever come up in a google search is small. Now that other 1% does provide large value to a lot of people. Feb 9 '15 at 22:17
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    @GabeSechan Accurate based on what? We all know - how? Stop spreading your misinformed opinions as facts, please. Besides, SO (and the whole SE) uses extreme SEO by tags and keeping proper titles. Your assumptions are plainly wrong. Feb 9 '15 at 22:17
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    "On the other hand someone could say that it helps understand who OP is - after all he's the primary audience here." Not true. Questions continue to get views long after the OP has solved their problem and moved on. The primary audience is the hundreds or thousands of people who visit the site in the future with the same problem. Feb 9 '15 at 23:10
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    I love how you guys think that the OP will be the only person who moves from X to Y, and therefore, it would never benefit any other users, who obviously learn Y in their mother's womb.
    – Masked Man
    Feb 10 '15 at 9:40
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I'd advise a controlled burn here. Depending on the actual content of the introduction, it could be relevant to the question, or unnecessary noise.

Take these things into account before removing:

  • Does this introduction prompt a solution using a different technology or framework than what is being prescribed? (E.G. an attempt using XML-based Spring wiring was done but they are using Spring Boot or otherwise want to use annotation-driven wiring)

  • Does this introduction provide context as to why the attempted solution is the way it is? (E.G. someone in Java is using loops and string concatenation instead of String.format, and it's teased out here)

  • Does the question read any worse without the introduction? If it does, tread carefully here - it could be the case that it still warrants removal, but if it makes the question clearer then by all means keep it in.

By and large you're going to be able to remove those introductions without much remorse, but it's worth taking a moment to stop and read what it is the intro is actually trying to get across.

As a for-instance, I'd singe the self-intro to something like...

I am currently working on a .NET C# WebAPI. I am familiar with C# and .NET webforms.

I'm half-tempted to remove the webforms part because it's not apparent if the question relates enough to webforms, but one would expect a PUT (and POST, especially post) action to be a part of some sort of submission form anyway.

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    "I am currently working on a .NET C# WebAPI" - that's what tags are for: [c#], [asp.net-web-api]. "I am familiar with C#" - if you weren't, you shouldn't be asking this question. "and .NET webforms" - that would only be relevant if the question were "I know how to do X in WebForms, how to do so in Web API?". So in this case, the intro can be safely removed.
    – CodeCaster
    Feb 10 '15 at 11:14
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    My experience coming from a Python background and having to use Java frameworks - 99% of things that I'd just do in Python are insanely difficult in Java w/Spring, requiring 3rd party libs all over. Being about as familiar with .NET as Ruby (actually maybe moreso) I'm assuming that the Ruby > .NET translation has similar problems. In this context, I'd leave the intro as the OP produced it (or ask in a comment for clarification on the point) Feb 10 '15 at 13:52
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    @Wayne that OP produced the text of their question is true for all questions, which would mean you'd never edit a question. That doesn't mean all text in a question is relevant. More often than not it's filler, or politeness, so irrelevant. The phrasing itself is what matters. Currently it doesn't add anything, as it doesn't explain what Ruby behavior OP is expecting from .NET.
    – CodeCaster
    Feb 10 '15 at 16:17
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    @CodeCaster which is probably something the OP should explain, and might be the best guidance of all. When we see this kind of filler we should comment and ask the OP something to the effect of, "You've pointed out you're familiar with X - is there an example in X of what you'd like to do in Y?" Now that you pointed it out, that seems like something I've done in a few questions. Feb 10 '15 at 19:14
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    @CodeCaster I'm not understanding the logic of "if you don't understand the topic, you shouldn't be asking anything about it" - Asking a question that (to you) doesn't have an answer is the fundamental force driving human knowledge forward. I personally think an introduction like the one referenced is perfect. It helps me to understand who I'm working with, and that information would help me transfer my knowledge in the most optimal way for consumption by the one requesting it.
    – user562566
    Feb 11 '15 at 7:20
  • @Technik that is not what I'm saying. Read my breakdown of the introduction sentence again. Hint: it's in the "this question" part.
    – CodeCaster
    Feb 11 '15 at 7:26
  • @Technik all I'm saying is one shouldn't be asking the specific question being asked in the question that is linked by OP when one is not familiar with C#. I'm a fan of brevity, and "I'm familiar with C#" is in my opinion not really necessary information to that question.
    – CodeCaster
    Feb 11 '15 at 7:43
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I come from a Ruby on Rails API background, but am currently working on a .NET C# WebAPI. I am familiar with C# and .NET webforms.

Although this is written in the first person, this is a way to put some general scope on the question. As such, this can be useful to provide answers that are of course useful to the asker, but also to a wider audience.

Firstly, this can lead to very good answer if the answerer is familiar with both sets of technologies. You could have things like "What Ruby calls X is more or less called Y in .NET, although feature Z of X is implemented in a totally different part of the .NET framework, see ABC...". These answers can be useful to readers coming from both angles, both when trying to use the other framework, or for learning the theory behind the framework they know in more details.

Secondly, going from one language/framework is actually fairly common. Even if we really want to insist on every Q&A on Stack Overflow exist for the purpose of a rather general knowledge base instead of primarily helping the asker, such a question would be likely to be useful to a wider audience anyway. Just do a search for "C# for Java programmers" for example. A general introductory book for C# and an introductory book for C# aimed at Java programmers should be very different.

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    "to put some general scope on the question" - that's what tags are for.
    – CodeCaster
    Feb 10 '15 at 16:13
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    @CodeCaster Not really, tags are there to categorise and to search. (1) Nothing wrong with mentioning the topic tags in the text: that makes the reading flow a bit better. It's part of the art of writing. (2) Without that, just tagging such a question with the ruby and c# tags won't tell you on their own which one is the main background, or even why ruby would be mentioned at all in what's mainly a C# question: editors (in particular people subscribing to the ruby tag) would just remove that ruby tag straight away.
    – Bruno
    Feb 10 '15 at 17:15
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    Because nowhere in that question Ruby is mentioned, besides the intro, it is irrelevant to the question. The first sentence should be the catchphrase, to get you interested in the question, not a resume to get to know the author. I do recognize such an intro can be of help, but in this particular case it adds zero to the question.
    – CodeCaster
    Feb 10 '15 at 17:25
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    @CodeCaster It is relevant if the answerer wants or can add complementary information that would make the explanation more understandable for someone coming from a Ruby background.
    – Bruno
    Feb 10 '15 at 17:28
  • It isn't, until OP mentions what Ruby principle they are after.
    – CodeCaster
    Feb 10 '15 at 17:29
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    @CodeCaster You're assuming the OP knows what they're doing wrong or that they know what they don't know. You could interpret this introduction as: "I'm not entirely sure whether I've taken habits from the Ruby world that are effectively bad habits in a C# environment. Please let me know if my approach isn't the preferred way to do it in .NET". That can happen frequently, I've seen Java code written by people with a C background passing two arguments in a method: an array, and the length of that array. If you didn't know their background, you'd wonder why they'd even think of doing that.
    – Bruno
    Feb 10 '15 at 17:34
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A life story doesn't add anything to the question, nor does a short resume. There are very few cases where mentioning prior experiences will actually help answering the question. A question should be as short and to the point as possible to increase readability and reduce scope.

If you disagree, please show me any question where an intro of who OP is and what technology stacks they have experience with does help understand the question. Where it could be relevant, is in the form of "I know how to do X with stack Y, how to do the same in Z?".

The intro paragraph of linked question is entirely irrelevant. The text has no link whatsoever to the actual question.

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It's just noise. Remove it with fire.

Please do fix all the other problems with the post though.

Such an introduction does not help answer the question. The answer shouldn't depend on the background of the asker.

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    The answer should not be accessible only to someone with the same background as the asker, but you should at least try to make sure it is accessible to someone with the asker's background.
    – Ben Voigt
    Feb 9 '15 at 23:54
  • @BenVoigt Sure you want it to be accessible to the OP, on the other side there's always the "lacks minimal understanding" reason we lost Feb 9 '15 at 23:57
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    I agree with the notion that answers are there to help all future visitors not just the asker, but I think your viewpoint is too radical. It's not just noise if it helps create an understanding between the asker and those that answer. Especially with such a small addition to the question, where it isn't going to inconvenience future readers anyway. Feb 10 '15 at 11:06
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    @Rudi It has only marginally more value than "Thanks" at the end (because it does provide some context). That said, putting it at the beginning takes up valuable "summary" space. If its that important, it should be worked into the general context instead of a block at the beginning. Feb 10 '15 at 17:18
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    @BradleyDotNET It seems that you're mainly objective based on the location more than anything else, which makes it sound almost pedantic. There's enough complaints that questions lack context and details to be answerable, when someone goes the other way and adds a couple of lines of details that may or may not be unnecessary, they also seem to be doing something wrong. Agreed, when it makes the question much longer, it can be trimmed, but this obsession to get the perfect, generic, reusable question is what makes SO less enjoyable these days. In doubt, leave things be, it won't kill you.
    – Bruno
    Feb 10 '15 at 17:27
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    @Bruno I agree with that. Just like you shouldn't go around just removing salutations/"Thanks"/"I'm a newbie"/"I'm usually a Java dev". That said, when performing other edits, its perfectly reasonable to clean this up, move it around, remove the fluff, etc. Feb 10 '15 at 17:35
  • Remove it with fire? Seems a little harsh for someone trying to either (1) frame their question by admitting a bias or ignorance that may be relevant in answering the question, or (2) being polite. Feb 12 '15 at 17:42
  • @SebastianGood Just a turn of phrase commonly used on Meta. I could have said "Remove it" and it would have been about the same :) Feb 12 '15 at 17:43
  • @SebastianGood We're all pyromaniacs here for some reason... :) Feb 12 '15 at 17:51
  • Worth remembering these are real people asking these questions. Feb 12 '15 at 17:53
  • @SebastianGood Absolutely, did it offend you in some way? Obviously by your answer you disagree with the general position I'm taking, but I'm certainly not trying to be rude towards anyone. Feb 12 '15 at 17:59
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Wow. Do the moderators have so little to do that they need to delete the sorts of social lubrication that make beginners feel comfortable asking their questions? Unless the introduction is insulting, amazingly wordy, or highly distracting, why mess with it?

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    First, it's the community, not the moderators. Second, while the asker might need some time to gather his nerve and get to the point, that's all superfluous make-work not in any way relevant to the question. Third, it just makes reading it pointlessly take longer, especially as some posters like to hide some critical nugget of information in a vast sea of irrelevancies. Feb 12 '15 at 17:59
  • last time I checked, there were over 30,000 "moderators" having privilege to do this
    – gnat
    Feb 12 '15 at 18:06
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    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas posuere porttitor sem, et finibus sapien lobortis sit amet. Cras nibh nulla, scelerisque a faucibus vel, euismod dapibus massa. Aliquam volutpat ut nulla eget dictum. Finding the relevant text among a lot of useless information makes the post harder to read. Quisque ut rhoncus tortor. Aenean ac semper erat. Ut libero lorem, viverra a faucibus eu, feugiat vel enim. Maecenas in mi ultricies, interdum ligula ut, convallis elit. Aenean quis elit ac sapien sollicitudin vulputate. Etiam luctus luctus nunc, sit amet finibus mi.
    – Servy
    Feb 12 '15 at 18:12
  • ...if every one of these 30,000 (that's thirty thousands) edited just one question in three days, that would be enough to edit all the new questions (Stack Overflow gets about 8,000 questions a day)
    – gnat
    Feb 12 '15 at 18:14

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