-12

I'm talking about the literal use of the word 'foo' as a placeholder in a code example. I believe when giving someone example code it is always better to use a concrete example, even if the names are irrelevant to the question.

Many people seem to disagree with this and claim that using a concrete example is distracting because you are adding extra domain information. I don't agree and find that having something concrete in your mind makes it much easier to understand a concept that using pure abstraction.

In my opinion it is easy for a reader to take something specific and generalize it than to just have the general description straight up. My question is should this practice be avoided if possible?

Edit: Here is a code sample:

public class Foo
{
}

public class Bar
{
}

public class DerivedA<GenericDerived> : BaseA<GenericA1, GenericA2>
{
}

public class DerivedB : DerivedA<Foo>
{
}

public class DerivedC : DerivedA<Bar>
{
}

public class DerivedD : List<DerivedA<Foo>>
{
}

public class MainClass
{
    public void Build()
    {
        DerivedD derivedD = new DerivedD();

        derivedD.Add(new DerivedB());

        derivedD.Add(new DerivedC());

        // ...
    }
}

Now tell me why I'm getting an error on the last line. Here is the same code with less general naming:

public class Bamboo
{
}

public class PalmTree
{
}

public class PlantHeight<T> : Dictionary<DateTime, double>
{
}

public class BambooHeight : PlantHeight<Bamboo>
{
}

public class PalmTreeHeight : PlantHeight<PalmTree>
{
}

public class GardenHeight : List<PlantHeight<Bamboo>>
{
}

public class MainClass
{
    public void BuildGarden()
    {
        GardenHeight gardenHeight = new GardenHeight();

        gardenHeight.Add(new BambooHeight());

        gardenHeight.Add(new PalmTreeHeight());

        // ...
    }
}

I claim the second one is much easier to comprehend due to the specific domain information included.

  • 1
    I didn't realise you had a question in here on the first read through... It's generally accepted that providing a minimal example is A Good Thing; not really sure who you're arguing with about this, but probably not someone here? – Ben Feb 7 '15 at 8:58
  • Sorry it is a bit of a rant-like question, I've bolded the actual question now. I find at least half the code examples have meaningless names. – LegendLength Feb 7 '15 at 9:09
  • I wholeheartedly agree with @Ben. Could you point us to any cases where someone disagreed with providing an example? – dirkk Feb 7 '15 at 9:09
  • The disagreement is simply demonstrated by anyone using 'foo', 'bar', 'a', 'b' for variable names in questions. I'll make a code example to try and make the question clearer. – LegendLength Feb 7 '15 at 9:10
  • The part you've bolded doesn't actually serve as a question, if you take that sentence out and put it at the top of your post it's meaningless. I'm still not sure what your question is. Are you stating that people should use foo as a variable name in examples or the original name? Are you somehow expecting either option to be policed? – Ben Feb 7 '15 at 9:13
  • 1
    IMHO, it really depends on the issue. If it's from real-life project, then I expect meaningful names of variables and classes. If it's more of general question (like performance/benchmark question), then using foo or bar is ok. – Andrew T. Feb 7 '15 at 9:45
  • @Ben The question is should the practice of using generic names be reduced if possible. I don't expect policing. – LegendLength Feb 7 '15 at 9:46
  • 1
    Pretty important, they are metasyntactic variables. I like the French ones: toto, titi, tata, tutu :) – Hans Passant Feb 7 '15 at 9:51
  • By the way @Ben & dirkk, you asked who disagrees with this? :) – LegendLength Feb 7 '15 at 10:10
  • I don't understand. If the code delivers its message, and it's easy to read and understand; does it matter? – user4516901 Feb 7 '15 at 10:37
  • @purplehuman My claim is that using 'foo' and 'bar' makes it less easy to read and understand. In my contrived example it is easy to see that public class GardenHeight : List<PlantHeight<Bamboo>> is wrong, because a garden contains all types of plants, not just bamboo. – LegendLength Feb 7 '15 at 11:11
12

I disagree.

However, for different reasons than @ben75. One size does not fit all. Sometimes a question can be clearer if it's about "foo"s and "bar"s, at other times it may be easier to understand a question if it's about "employee" and "boss".

Let's not have general rules on whether "foo" and "bar" are recommended or not. Use common sense and tailor for the situation. Use foo-bar when appropriate, or stick with more concrete concepts if the question warrants it.

If you don't understand a question because e.g. the concrete concepts in the question are hard to grasp: comment, downvote, and vote to close as appropriate.

7

I disagree.

We don't want to know details that aren't relevant to the problem. Replacing irrelevant business oriented variable/class names by Fooand Bar is something that we expect from the OP.

IMHO, this substitution is part of the process of isolating the problem and presenting an SSCCE (instead of a quick cut&paste of ugly code followed by "plz debug my cod").

Of course, technical variable names like length of an array is always better with a meaningful name like lengthOfFooArrayinstead of a.

EDIT

The problem with your example is not so the substitution of domain oriented names by more abstract Foo and Bar, but the fact that this substitution wasn't done "the smart way" :

  • DerivedA, DerivedB, DerivedC, DerivedD are very different and using similar names is a bad idea.
  • you have also replaced well known domain-agnostic type like Dictionary, double and DateTime. I wouldn't recommend this.
  • For the dictionary, it could be any class. I just used it in this example. For instance it could be ReportDocument<Employee, PayGrade>. So I don't think it is relevant or supports your point. For DerivedA, DerivedB etc. having similar names, to me 'foo', 'bar' and 'baz' are just as similar because they are all general. Sure the physical letters in those names are more similar in DerivedX, but I could've just put 'A', 'B', 'C' instead which are all very different. – LegendLength Feb 7 '15 at 11:09

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .