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I have incidentally come across this thread, where people have actively disapproved of closing this question:

Put on hold as too broad by rene, davidism, vaultah, Sam, iCodez 2 hours ago

...

Meta: It's interesting that 5 users thought that it would benefit the SO community to put this question on hold, while 100+ thought it was an interesting question. In one way, SO does keep the noise down pretty well, but this doesn't feel to me like noise. Does avoiding questions like these actually make SO a better place? Is there a reworded version of this question that would actually elicit better responses? Or is this just the joy of playing the enforcer?

I don't think their points are valid, because that question is too broad by definition and I would vote to close it again. However, I have to admit that the question was originally closed shortly after it was discussed in two of the SO chat rooms.

At the time of writing the question is reopened (~5.5 hours after the question was closed and ~3 hours after the message), but is there any point in re-closing it?

  • 2
    I'm not going to get involved into a close/open war. I voted on that question from the CVQ as first voter probably because it was flagged by someone with less < 3K. It is too broad by today standards IMHO. If the re-open voters feel differently about that, let them have it their way. – rene Feb 5 '15 at 20:48
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    It seems rather off-topic. There is no specific programming problem presented. The whole thing looks more like a philosophical/political discussion about the idea. – animuson Feb 5 '15 at 20:54
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    I'll share one tip that's made my life better: don't pay any attention to what commenters on Hacker News say. – Brad Larson Feb 5 '15 at 21:02
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    Why is my bike slow when a cheetah can run at 60mph? Lousy question. – Will Feb 5 '15 at 21:03
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    Ta da... Meta effect > HackerNews effect – LittleBobbyTables Feb 5 '15 at 21:03
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    Take your pick. Too broad, Primarily Opinion Based, Not enough mention of Waffles nor Unicorns ... it should be closed. – Bart Feb 5 '15 at 21:03
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    "It's interesting that 5 users thought that it would benefit the SO community to put this question on hold, while 100+ thought it was an interesting question." There are far more people who have upvote privileges than have vote to close privileges, by design. – Bill the Lizard Feb 5 '15 at 21:09
  • The initial close process got started by me because the link was broad up in the SO Close voters room. Some regulars voted on it when they noticed the link in the chattransscript. So I didn't vote from the CVQ... – rene Feb 5 '15 at 21:17
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    There are plenty of interesting questions that are too broad for SO, even those that are programming-related. Being an interesting question doesn't necessarily make it not a good target for closing. – neminem Feb 5 '15 at 21:20
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    Aww, we only went an hour before the first re-open vote was cast. The Close Vote wars, begun they have. – LittleBobbyTables Feb 5 '15 at 22:08
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    @BradLarson: Actually, I have found that the commentary on Hacker News is even more interesting and valuable than the links that their comments are attached to. The problem in this particular case is just that some of the folks on HN don't seem to understand the current SO question policy, or they do but they disagree with it. To be fair, some of the HN commentary on that link does try to point out SO question policy, and why closing the question is the proper thing to do. – John Y Feb 5 '15 at 22:19
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    Well, the answers are all rather poor, "because of money" as the top answer is not a fantastic insight. No wonder they want to keep the question opened, Lars Bak might show up some day. Theoretically. – Hans Passant Feb 5 '15 at 23:21
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    The question is nearly unreadable. Why is it so locked that I can't downvote it? – bmargulies Feb 6 '15 at 12:07
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    @yuvi: It is an interesting question, posted to the wrong Stack Exchange site. StackOverflow is for technical questions about software implementation (and some design), not sociopolitical/financial issues external to the coding process that cause some software projects to thrive. – Ben Voigt Feb 8 '15 at 19:00
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    @animuson can this question be unlocked? I think the issue was solved, and we rather not keep that bad example around, no? – Braiam Apr 17 '16 at 18:00
27

Well, if it was closed through the "well known cv-pls process", I would argue (for the sake of arguing) that it was reopened by the Hacker News mob voting. See where this is going?

The fact that a question was voted, for whatever reason, using whatever method, is not relevant nor important. Somebody brought attention to an specific post, and people shared the view that something must be done. That's the entire extent of the issue.

Since I've buried the unimportant issue, now I would say that that question is not what Stack Overflow is for. I don't even think that breaking down the question, or making questions based on the answers would be allowed anywhere, as the specific issues the question tries to address are basically "the developers haven't implemented those". If the OP would have investigated correctly the topic (ie. that there are Ruby/Java implementations with inline caching) he wouldn't have asked that question, but the question that came after: what language implementation should I use to get X feature? And we all know those questions aren't also on topic here, either.

  • 2
    What the heck do you mean by "dilapidating the question"? You lost me there. – Makoto Feb 5 '15 at 21:14
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    @Makoto changed the verb. Is a bit archaic word, that in some parts means (loosely) "separating into stones". – Braiam Feb 5 '15 at 21:18
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    That word's particular usage hasn't been heard in quite some time...but alright, I'm satisfied with how it reads now. Much clearer. – Makoto Feb 5 '15 at 21:19

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