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I've left a couple of comments on a question, in which the person asking the question states:

I'm aware that this is a fairly common question but it seems like the answer is always to include a hard-coded height. I would like to avoid this because while that was a perfectly fine solution for the desktop styling this is intended to be displayed on mobile devices and as such I'd like it to be a bit more responsive than a hard-coded height.

This, to my mind, demonstrates an attempt (however cursory) at finding existing duplicates, but finding them inapplicable to the stated problem raised in the question itself.

The following conversation was raised in the comments to that question, between another user (who remains anonymous because this isn't a witch-hunt), myself and the OP of the question (note that there are other comments interspersed, but excised for brevity):

This is a duplicate of so many questions. - UserOne

@UserOne you're right, the question is probably amongst the most common on Stack Overflow but I couldn't find one that worked for my situation (no hard-coded height). I'd be thrilled with a link to an answered question that does, though! =) - OP

@UserOne: so vote to close as such.1 - Me

When you're asking a question you should search for duplicates, not rely on others to do so. – UserOne

...

@UserOne Not to repeat myself but I did. I could not find any that replicated this question even though there are hordes that bear superficial similarities. You clearly feel it's a duplicate, however, so I was asking you to post a link to one – that way we could have this question removed for being redundant or have a permanent link for folks such as myself that couldn't find it. – OP

@UserOne: as the person that stated that this "is a duplicate of so many questions" the onus is on you to find a duplicate, and vote to close as such, otherwise your comment adds nothing but noise.1 - Me

@Me Feel free to disagree if you want, my comment is not noise. It lets the asker know that the answer is out there on this site if they search for it. – UserOne

Clearly UserOne disagrees with me, which is fine; but it has left me wondering: we like that someone asking a question researches first, the OP here demonstrates (at least cursory, and non-productive) research effort. This user has left a comment which s/he feels appropriate stating that there are duplicates, but chooses not to point them out to the OP, or to others in the community.

This feels, to me, a dismissive action; it provides no help to anyone and seems to be equivalent to a dismissive "go look again, properly this time," hence my reaction ("the onus is on [the commenter] to find the duplicate") and point it/them out; otherwise the comment is simply noise. Plus the ability to flag questions as duplicates (I think, it's a long time since I've had to use flags for that) and vote-to-close as duplicate leads me to believe that it's the duty of the commenter.

My question, then: in this situation, is the onus, to find the duplicate, on the person asking the question to go look again for duplicate(s), or on the person leaving the comment that duplicates exist?


  1. there was more to this comment, directed at the OP, but irrelevant to the question.
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    You could have commented: @UserOne Strange, I'm sure you are right but I can't find the correct dupe. problem solved... – rene Feb 3 '15 at 21:42
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    As an addendum, the question under discussion is a duplicate of one of the most viewed questions of the tag, already sporting about 100 duplicates. – Nit Feb 3 '15 at 21:45
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    @rene: what problem does that solve, exactly? – David Thomas Feb 3 '15 at 21:47
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    @DavidThomas It tries to trick the commenter in presenting a duplicate to you showing off his/her search skills.... that only works if you are the higher rep though... – rene Feb 3 '15 at 21:49
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    @rene: possibly, but given the commenter's apparent belief that it's not their job to find the duplicate, I'm not convinced that would have solved the problem. Though I admire your attempted solution. :) – David Thomas Feb 3 '15 at 21:51
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    I would've just flagged the original "This is a duplicate of so many questions." comment as not constructive. – Roddy of the Frozen Peas Feb 4 '15 at 0:06
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    I read this question title in the Hot Meta Posts sidebar a little too quickly.... – Milo Feb 4 '15 at 0:57
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    @Milo: if it involved seeing an 'a' in the, uh, wrong place I honestly don't want to know... – David Thomas Feb 4 '15 at 0:58
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    The onus should be on the technology underpinning each SE site. If it cannot accurately detect probable duplicates based upon the subject and content of a new question, then a critical failure has already occurred. It's unreasonable to expect anyone else to successfully use the platform's search features and algorithms to track down a duplicate if/when the platform itself has failed to do so. – aroth Feb 5 '15 at 5:18
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    the first comment of UserOne is as useful as somehow answering Yes to the question Do you have the time? – njzk2 Feb 6 '15 at 15:08
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    Next time someone ask me if I have the time, I'll answer "This is a duplicate of so many questions." – Zano Feb 6 '15 at 16:58
  • In this particular case, it seems like the OP just unfortunately framed it as a duplicate, but his question is NOT a duplicate if he has searched the similar questions and none of them answer his actual question, which is how to do a non-hard-coded value. – Dronz Feb 6 '15 at 23:14
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Flag UserOne's comment(s) as non-constructive. Once deleted, take yours down and flag the OP's as obsolete, or ask them to delete themselves. I suppose if they make a habit of this sort of pointless "I know of a positive contribution I could make, but I won't, because you should" teasing, they should probably get a talking-to from a diamond.

You can't stop them from downvoting, of course, and you specifically want them to VtC if at all possible, but commenting that a question is definitely a dupe, without saying which one, is the opposite of helpful. Especially in this case, where it wastes time from everyone who tries to find the dozens of questions that are supposedly trivial duplicates and doesn't come up with any.

On the other hand, commenting that a question is likely a dupe could be helpful, if it reminds someone with the needed knowledge to do a fuller search and track down which. This is not that case.

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    The post isn't unconstructive. It is informing the post author of problems with the post that they should correct. Telling someone that they have a problem, even if you don't actually fix the problem for them, is still constructive. Without the comment, the OP would simply be unaware of the problems with his own question, and therefore be unable to do anything about it. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 15:03
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    @Servy It seems more like the comment lazily assumes the question is a duplicate without backing that up at all... which you'd think would be easy considering that there are "so many duplicates" to choose from. If the question isn't actually a duplicate, what use is that comment? – canon Feb 4 '15 at 17:47
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    @canon If the comment is incorrect, then by all means address that problem. Reply and state your conflicting viewpoint if you disagree with it. The fact that you think that it's wrong doesn't make it not constructive or meriting deletion. As for what use it serves, it provides feedback to the author that there is a problem with their post, feedback that they can potentially use to improve the post, or feedback that they can ignore. Either way, that's up to them. Silencing people from providing feedback is simply not constructive. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 17:49
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    @Servy There are plenty of times when I'm pretty certain that a question is a dupe but, for the life of me, I can't find the original. There's no way I'd expect the OP to find the original question if I couldn't find it myself. Tossing that, "this is a dupe" accusation out there without proof is potentially harmful to a legitimate question. I'd be curious to see some stats on downvotes suffered after such comments. – canon Feb 4 '15 at 17:54
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    @canon Again, if you feel that the author wouldn't have been able to find a working solution with any reasonable amount of research effort, you are more than welcome to provide that feedback. Informing someone that their question has problems isn't universally prohibited because it's possible that in some cases they might be wrong. If you think a particular piece of feedback is wrong, then say so, don't assume that nobody should be providing any negative feedback ever. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 17:57
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    @Servy I'm not saying negative feedback is a bad thing. I love negative feedback! I'm saying that, "this is a dupe" is pretty easy to validate... and it's lazy as hell to simply accuse the OP without evidence-particularly when he's specified how his question differs from similar questions he's found on the site. – canon Feb 4 '15 at 18:00
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    @canon So your response to "this question didn't do sufficient research effort" is to do the OP's research for them, and not tell them that they did anything wrong. This is actively encouraging them to not do research in the future, because they know that someone else will just do it for them if the post the question without performing even cursory research. Again, if you think that the question did perform sufficient research, then you're just saying that this comment is incorrectly evaluating this post, not that comments saying thinks like that are inherently problematic. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 18:08
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    @Servy It would seem that the site encourages that behavior via the VTC as Duplicate feature. If you have enough time to leave a comment (specifically about dupes), I'm sure you have the time to verify that your comment is actually accurate... and if you can't or SO's search is too ineffectual to produce a dupe you know exists, how could you expect the OP to find it? – canon Feb 4 '15 at 18:11
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    @canon As I say in my answer, the only way to close a question as a duplicate is to provide the duplicate. Closing a question is radically different from just posting a comment to provide feedback. It's actively inhibiting anyone else from answering. The fact that closure requires more than just one person thinking it's a duplicate, without actually providing one, is quite reasonable. Asserting that someone cannot say that a post isn't sufficiently researched without doing all of that person's research for them is very different. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 18:13
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    @canon The fact that someone else doesn't want to take the time to do the research that the post other was obligated to do before asking the question on behalf of the question author, particularly if they know that finding the information is extremely easy, seems entirely reasonable to me. How else will people learn to do research if you always do it for them without any expectation of them doing it themselves? You assume the commented couldn't find a duplicate. Perhaps they found one in a few seconds and that is how they knew that the OP could have found it just as easily? – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 18:15
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    @servy Closure isn't the be-all. Simple accusations in comments can be pretty damning whether they're accurate or not. I'll bet the mere accusation is enough to affect voting on a question -even if it wasn't truly a duplicate in the first place. So, if I'm the OP (also a new user), and I know my question isn't a dupe... what's my recourse? Get in an argument in comments? What does that accomplish other than making me look like a petulant child against an established user? Could I flag his comment as inaccurate and damaging to the perception of my question? – canon Feb 4 '15 at 18:23
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    @canon You don't have to look everywhere. You don't need to prove that it is impossible for you to find the information, just that you don't need to prove that God doesn't exist. You merely need to explain what you have done, where you have looked, what problems you've had with the information that you have found, why it has not worked, etc. You don't need to prove that your question isn't a duplicate, just that you weren't able to find one. Stating that you couldn't find a duplicate, or that you did your research, is very different from demonstrating that you did your research. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 18:34
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    @Servy In this particular case, the OP seemed to provide that information up front and it didn't seem to matter. Granted, I haven't seen the actual question so I wasn't able to see if it really was a duplicate... but it seems like the OP is left with nowhere to go after a, "there are so many dupes of this..." comment other than, "As stated in my question, I've looked; feel free to show me an actual duplicate." – canon Feb 4 '15 at 18:36
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    @canon Which is a sign that the comment may have been wrong in this instance. That doesn't make such comments universally inappropriate. Of course, it's also possible that while the OP demonstrated some research effort, the commenter felt it wasn't sufficient. Without context, I couldn't say if he is right or wrong. It's also possible that the solutions he found do solve his problem, or that he failed to adequately explain why what he found isn't working for him. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 18:40
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    Wow, what a discussion. Someone should invent a chat feature... oh, wait... – Thomas Weller Feb 6 '15 at 12:52
12

Users asking questions are expected to research their questions before asking them and to search for duplicates before posting. This is a prominent theme of the help center's pages on how to ask questions.

If a question is not well researched, you should be downvoting it. That is the appropriate mechanism for indicating that a question's author didn't do sufficient research before asking their question.

The only way to close a question because it is poorly researched is to find a duplicate and vote to close the question.

So if UserOne wants this question closed, they'll need to find a duplicate to close it against. If they're fine just downvoting and moving on, that's also their prerogative. They certainly aren't obligated to do the OP's research for them and go out of their way to find a duplicate if they don't want to.

If UserOne wants to leave a comment to go along with their downvote (or even instead of a downvote, I guess) to indicate that the primary problem with the question is a lack of sufficient research, they certainly are welcome to do so, as long as that comment remains constructive and isn't rude/offensive. They don't have to find a duplicate to vote to close with in order to inform the author that their post lacks sufficient research effort, nor are they prohibited from explaining their downvote in a comment so that the author understands what problem their question has.

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    But the comment that "This is a duplicate of so many questions" followed by the unwillingness to point out a duplicate feels as if that comment immediately becomes unconstructive, and unnecessarily noisy. I have no issue with the question being placed on hold as a duplicate, it's simply the lack of effort, the refusal to help, and perhaps several unwarranted inferences I've drawn from UserOne's comments, that irritates me. – David Thomas Feb 3 '15 at 22:17
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    @DavidThomas And people posting low quality questions and not bothering to do their research before asking is very irritating to me. It's perfectly fine to tell someone that they didn't do enough research before asking their question. You are not obligated to do all of their research for them just to tell them that they didn't do enough research to post a question. Fundamentally it is the author's responsibility to research their question before asking it, not the reader's responsibility to do 100% of their research for them because the question author couldn't be bothered to. – Servy Feb 3 '15 at 22:22
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    Seems unconstructive to me too, if that fact was already mentioned in the question. flag as such? The question isn't a duplicate if within the question you "successfully" explain why your situation is different from the supposed duplicates. – Kevin B Feb 3 '15 at 22:22
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    Did he/she explain why the duplicates didn't solve the problem? if not, then it's probably still a dupe – Kevin B Feb 3 '15 at 22:24
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    @KevinB So if someone asks, "How do I add two numbers together. Oh, and I already searched on Google, there were no solutions?" you'll just trust them and assume that there really are no solutions on Google and that they really did do their best to try and find an existing solution? The fact that someone says that they did their research doesn't mean that they actually did it. And of course if you, as a second reader of the question, feel that the question is a well researched question, you're more than welcome to provide that feedback as well, just as another user can say the opposite. – Servy Feb 3 '15 at 22:24
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    In that case, as you mention to Kevin, the lack of research is evident from personal knowledge; I'm personally not aware of a duplicate of this question. Hence my asking UserOne to identify one (as did the OP in the comments) in order that it might be closed. As to the level of research undertaken I'm entirely indifferent (though I'd happily use my own dupe-hammer to close if someone raises a reasonable dupe); I am, though, confused by behaviour that leaves critical remarks, assumes no personal responsibility and is simply noisy and unconstructive. – David Thomas Feb 3 '15 at 22:29
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    @DavidThomas One is not obligated to fix all of the problems a post one reads. If a user instead wants to take the time to inform the author of the post's problems, without taking the time to fix all of them, they can. It's often an appropriate middle ground between doing nothing and doing everything for them. It can often be even more constructive than just fixing all of the problems with the question as it helps the author learn how to ask better questions in the future. At the end of the day, that user has no responsibility to fix the question. The question author does. – Servy Feb 3 '15 at 22:32
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    @DavidThomas If you, or a question author, consider polite comments indicating problems with a question to be noise, then that's just unfortunate to me, and considering all the complaints that I constantly see about unexplained downvotes and how people want to know what problems their post has that need improvement, it seems that others also feel that its not noise. If you personally aren't interested in reading about how a post can be improved, then it's probably not worth your time to read comments in general, as that's their primary purpose. – Servy Feb 3 '15 at 22:34
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    I feel like I'm missing something, I'm genuinely not trying to be obtuse, but while I can accept it's not the obligation of the commenter to provide a link to the duplicate question, expecting the person asking the question (who's stated that they've already searched without resolution) to search again without direction seems, at best, counter-productive. And I don't see how the comment left in that question could be anything other than noise, in what way is that useful, given that the OP states that s/he had searched already? – David Thomas Feb 3 '15 at 22:43
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    ...Assuming the OP is telling the truth, the comment provides no further assistance as to where these duplicates might be. If the OP is lying about having searched, the s/he's not going to take that information and do anything with it. Without direction I can't close the question (without being forced to go search myself). If there'd been a glimmer of information in the comment I'd be happy to close the question. And yes, I could search, but a quick (and I do mean a very quick) search didn't yield a dupe for this particular question. So, I fail to see how it was of any use. – David Thomas Feb 3 '15 at 22:43
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    @vapcguy You can't VTC as duplicate without providing the duplicate. Feature complete! – BradleyDotNET Feb 4 '15 at 1:21
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    Ultimately, this site is supposed to be professionals interacting in a professional way - and so any comment you make should be something you'd similarly make to the person sitting in the next room/cube/office. This is a dupe of so many questions... is unprofessional and rude. – Joe Feb 4 '15 at 17:37
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    @Joe At the end of the day it is the responsibility of the person asking the question to do their research before asking their question. That responsibility does not lie in everyone else to do it for them because they just couldn't be bothered. Asking questions of other professions, such as your co-workers, without doing any reasonable amount of research first, is not respecting their time. It is rude an unprofessional. Informing someone that they have not done their due diligence before asking a question, instead of just doing their work for them, is a professional response. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 17:42
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    You both are criticizing the asker - which is fine. If the question is not thoroughly researched, the question should be. That does not make the comment constructive, though. Two wrongs do not make a right. Pointing out rudeness is not rude, unless done rudely, which that comment certainly was. – Joe Feb 4 '15 at 20:00
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    Personally, since the asker clearly did do the research, to the best of his or her ability, I find it hard to see the response as anything but condescending. It can be difficult to find an existing question amongst dozens or hundreds of similar but distinct questions, and "try harder" is not a helpful suggestion. (My opinion may be biased by the fact that in my experience, the person claiming that the question is a duplicate probably just hasn't read it carefully enough to understand that it is different.) – Harry Johnston Feb 5 '15 at 4:44
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I'm going to answer the heading question, without reference to the particulars of this case. The particulars of this case, are well answered already.

On whom is the onus of finding a duplicate of a question?

This is the wrong way to think:

The onus is on the whole community to make the site a better place Each person brings their skills to the table, some people are good at editing for clarity, some people are good at finding tags to be burninated, and some people are good at finding duplicate questions.

Yes, it is nice if the question asker can just write clearly, and doesn't use bad tags, and ask questions that have not been asked before, but because we all have varying strengths and weaknesses, odds are that in at least one of those (example) categories someone else in the community could do it better. So that person (who is better), can, will and should do what they can to help improve the site.

This is why we can do things other sites can't, like edit each others posts

The onus is on us all, to help each other out -- not to point fingers and blame.

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    No. Unless I'm being paid for it, I will apply my personal criteria. If I think I'm being used, eg. as a Google search slave or debugging engine, I will react appropriately. Effective cooperation works fine as long as the other parties don't take the piss. Each person brings their skills to the table, and one of those skills is conning other people to do work for them for free. – Martin James Feb 4 '15 at 0:26
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    @MartinJames I'm not entirely sure what I said that made you think that I am saying people shouldn't to there best to find duplicates. I'm saying they should. But I am also saying that other people can do it better (except for that one guy on the site who is the current best at finding duplicates in that area.). The onus is on everyone, including the asker. – Lyndon White Feb 4 '15 at 0:38
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    @MartinJames That attitude is becoming so prevalent here, and I'm getting so sick of it! You may think a guy is trying to make you a Google slave, but so what? You know how to not let that affect you? Ignore it! I get so tired of people around being so high and mighty. Maybe the guy asking is being a jerk or lazy, but maybe he's someone genuinely in need of help and willing to work for his answers. It's like we forget that this site exists to SERVE people. I agree with Oxinabox. This site exists to help people, and being a jerk to a jerk (who may not actually be a jerk) isn't helpful. – mbm29414 Feb 4 '15 at 1:14
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    @mbm29414 The site doesn't exist to serve other people. It is not a place for people to just get free programming work done because some people are suckers and giving it away for free. It is a place designed to create a repository of useful programming knowledge readily available to the entire world. Having quality questions with quality answers serves that purpose. Answering the same duplicate question hundreds of times or doing Google searches for people who couldn't be bothered to utilize the amazing resources already provided by others on the site is not serving that purpose. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 15:07
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    @Servy Sorry, but that's a foolish false dichotomy. "Useful programming knowledge readily available to the entire world" == "existing to serve people". I'm not arguing in favor of poor questions or letting people get their work done for free. I'm arguing that we have mechanisms to appropriately handle those cases and being a jerk about doesn't serve anyone's (legitimate) purpose. – mbm29414 Feb 4 '15 at 17:25
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    @mbm29414 I suppose I should have been more precise; the site doesn't exist just to serve the one person asking the question at the expense of everyone else, which appears to be what you're asserting. Informing someone politely that they have not done sufficient research before asking their question is not being a jerk. It is providing constructive feedback on the quality of the question. There are rude ways to say it and appropriate ways to say it, but the inherent act of telling someone that their question is not up to the site's standards is not inherently rude or inappropriate. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 17:45
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    @mbm29414 You're quite right that we have mechanisms for dealing with poor quality questions that don't meet the site's standards. And one of the primary mechanisms in place is to comment on the question to politely inform the question author that their question has problems, and to explain what those problems are (in this case, insufficient research). That is (one of) the appropriate mechanisms for dealing with this type of problem. Asserting that one is not allow to use comments to inform a question author of problems with their question is just absurd. It's why comments exist. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 17:47
  • @MartinJames You are free to decline to answer any question you like, especially ones you feel are lacking in effort. As a member of this community graciously hosted by the StackExchange team, though, you are still expected to adhere to the guidelines and rules set forth by them. This answer is spot on for what's expected of us as members of this community. If you don't like that as a general principle, maybe this community is not really a good fit for you, and that's okay. And if you only feel that way about specific questions, don't forget the Be Nice policy. Just ignore them and move on. – jpmc26 Feb 4 '15 at 18:06
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    @jpmc26 The SE guidelines include extensive information about what makes a quality question. When a question violates those rules and guidelines, for example by not doing reasonable research effort before asking the question, the community is expected to respond using a number of different tools that their disposal to encourage quality content. One of those tools is to comment indicating the problems in the question. To just say that one should ignore any question they don't like is in fact contrary to SE's guidelines. The community is not expected to ignore problems in questions. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 18:31
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    @Servy You aren't actually paying attention to my comments. I'm completely in favor of corrective actions and comments. I like the site being clean and functional and valuable. I'm objecting to people who feel it's their duty to be jerks or obtuse while doing this. In the OP's example, the commenter made a jerky comment in passing and wouldn't put forth any effort to substantiate his claim. That's irritating and unhelpful. And it doesn't lead to better questions OR answers. – mbm29414 Feb 4 '15 at 19:02
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    @mbm29414 No, there is nothing whatsoever inappropriate about informing someone that they didn't do enough research. It did so politely and without being insulting (unlike your tone here, for example). But I suppose I'll humor you; how do you feel he should have phrased the comment for you to not consider it inappropriate? – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 19:04
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    @Servy First, I'm not being insulting. Unless using words based on their dictionary definition is insulting. Even you agreed you were imprecise in your first comment, and you didn't correctly represent my position in your second. In response to your question: if I make a claim of "duplicate", I provide the link to the duplicate question. The OP has already asserted their attempt to find an answer and the inability to do so. Claiming this to be false in a comment without substantiating the claim (by linking to said duplicate) is - at best - lazy and - at worst - arrogantly condescending. – mbm29414 Feb 4 '15 at 19:10
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    @mbm29414 So you have no problem with someone being too lazy to do any reasonable amount of research before asking a question, but you feel that it's inappropriate for anyone to claim that the question author was being lazy when asking their question because doing so is being lazy? Do you not realize the contradiction there. You're criticizing someone for being lazy because they criticized someone for being lazy, asserting that criticizing someone for being lazy is wrong. Take your own advice. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 19:36
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    @mbm29414 If you think the comment is wrong then you can think that he's wrong, and you're more than welcome to indicate that you think that the question is well researched if you would like. Saying that he doesn't have the right to express his view that he feels that the question isn't well researched isn't a valid concern though. You don't have to agree with him, but you do have to respect his right to that viewpoint. Whether the comment is correct or not is something that I haven't even expressed a view on. Without seeing the specific question, there's no way for me to know he is right. – Servy Feb 4 '15 at 19:56
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    @Servy Let me be excruciatingly clear: I do not think the comment should be deleted. I do agree with Oxinabox that said comment does a poor job of reflecting the values this site ought to have, namely, looking out for the quality of the site and serving as a helpful resource to others. I do think that comments such as "This is a duplicate, but, even though you've indicated you can't find the duplicate, I'm not going to help you" are unhelpful at best. Does that help you see my perspective? – mbm29414 Feb 4 '15 at 21:42
-22

Everything is a duplicate, search for a math problem and you'll find a thousand solutions, but a thousand solutions don't necessarily mean a solution for a particular person. What people tend to forget is that we are individuals with different comprehension abilities.

Just because you can solve x^2=10x-2x^2+139 and provide a solution for it doesn't mean that other people who see your solution for that particular problem will understand it. Some people will need extra help such as what the different letters and numbers represent.

To point a person back to a "provided" solution that they already have seen and tried to understand doesn't really help that person in anyway. Duplicates have a purpose, they provide information differently and that is what makes it great, sometimes you need a "new perspective" to understand something.

The person who posted a duplicate question and admitted to posting a duplicate because of the fact that he didn't understand the original or other duplicates, obviously is justified. You aren't him and you can't know what he understands and doesn't understand.

I myself have to search and looked at 10-25 duplicates sometimes and even then I may not be able to solve my problem. Duplicates have a purpose as long as they aren't identical and they help a lot of people.

Pointing fingers on the other hand doesn't accomplish anything, if you aren't up to task to go through with finding out whether a post is truly a duplicate, don't "burden" yourself with the task of it.

Imagine a judge sentencing a person to prison even though the judge never has seen this person, or heard of him... Don't be that judge!

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    Having 1000 duplicates of the same question is bad. Having 10 is ok, its a scale thing. But if you are going to post something that you know is considered a duplicate, you need to do a good job explaining what didn't make sense with those answers. Otherwise, we would just be parroting the same information, which is why we close duplicates (to prevent such parroting). – BradleyDotNET Feb 4 '15 at 0:49
  • @BradleyDotNET That is true, however we didn't go from Cart to car by sticking with one type of cart, with each cart a new piece was added(not really) and evetually that is what led to the cars we have today. Duplication is, it's what leads to solutions and better solutions and progress. There are obvious answers such as 5+5=10, easy to understand right, well, there are those who don't know what 5+5 equals to... But all in all, I agree, somewhat. As long as the duplicates aren't Identical I don't see the issue on how many there are. – NewbieLearner Feb 4 '15 at 1:08
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    Without going in circles, the key is that you explain why those solutions didn't work/make sense. By doing so, you've made your question not a duplicate! Just saying, I didn't get X solution, or Y post didn't work for me isn't enough (and few posters make even that effort). You have to be specific. – BradleyDotNET Feb 4 '15 at 1:23
  • Of course, I completely agree on that, you can't ask a question which you've already seen a dozen of answers to and hope somebody gives you an answer which you can understand. – NewbieLearner Feb 4 '15 at 1:38
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    "Imagine a judge sentencing a person to prison even though the judge never has seen this person, or heard of him... " It's called "In absentia" and it's a perfectly valid part of law in many locations. You don't need to see someone ("justice is blind") or have previously heard of them to come to a conclusion as to whatever they're accused of transgresses some point of law. – user146043 Feb 6 '15 at 13:06
  • When I said "never have heard of" I meant it in every way. judged without the judge even reading your file to know what you are accused of. And it's highly arguable whether justice is "blind" or not, but that isn't the point here :P – NewbieLearner Feb 7 '15 at 3:19

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