8

The new message for custom close reasons reads thus:

I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because (insert reason here)

I never much cared for comments that were, in effect, glorified statements that said, "Voting to close because (whatever reason here)", because it really sounded like a tattle-tale. Someone had made a post that was off-topic, and the tone of it made it sound like they were rubbing it in their face. It always rubbed me the wrong way.

I can appreciate that there's some sort of discussion on this, but it seems like the last action was chosen.

Frankly, I don't appreciate this tone. I would prefer some simpler alternative to it. The second comment that Shog suggests in the previously linked discussion would be acceptable.

  • 6
    I agree; if you read it assuming someone wrote it manually (which is perfectly reasonable), it sounds bad. – Andrew Barber Jan 27 '15 at 23:27
  • 1
    Many comments say "Its unclear what you are asking". They could have easily said "Its unclear what you are asking, so I'm voting to close" or even "I'm voting to close this question because its unclear what you are asking" None of those feel "tattle-taleish" at least to me. – BradleyDotNET Jan 27 '15 at 23:28
  • People also just remove the boiler-plate text and use their comment as a close reason, so it's not immediately obvious that they VTC'd at all. – user3920237 Jan 27 '15 at 23:32
  • @remyabel: This is very true. However, the boilerplate serves its purpose as well; if I don't require the deeper elaboration, I can use the default response instead. This has worked well in the past; it's just now it reads really terribly to me. If I were going to go as far as delete the boilerplate and close vote every time, we may as well have "Too Localized" as a close vote reason again. – Makoto Jan 27 '15 at 23:33
  • 4
    Sorry to be a tattle-tale, but I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because – BoltClock Jan 28 '15 at 4:51
7

It's a bare, factual statement of what you're doing; you really don't need to be ashamed of that.

But if it bothers you and you'd prefer to write something else, then go right ahead - you're under no obligation to keep the prefix, you just have to write something.

This is one of the least-used close reasons, and has been for a very long time; the worst part is, it's frequently mis-used for questions that are unclear or have other issues. If you know what you're doing, if you don't need the hand-holding, then just write something that makes sense and move on; leave the boilerplate for the folks who bottomed out the menu looking for a "pls send teh codes" option and can't be bothered to backtrack.

  • 2
    It's not that I'm ashamed; it's just that the wording on it reads in a way that can grind on someone's nerves. I also entirely agree with you that it's misused, too. However, there are still edge cases in which it applies; I feel like having a more sensible tone as opposed to what's there now would be a better move. – Makoto Jan 28 '15 at 5:15
  • 1
    "If you know what you're doing, if you don't need the hand-holding," too bad, you're screwed because of all the idiots mis-using this close reason. Here's a pro tip: this change is useless as it won't stop users misusing the close reason, and it also won't stop anybody stupid enough to believe that a close comment from a single user is the word of god. The "problem" (not really one IMO) cited by you and Robert in the linked question still persists with this wording - instead of people thinking "oh, this (vim/re/etc) is off topic" they now think "oh, we should VTC this as off topic". – l4mpi Jan 28 '15 at 8:45
0

To contrast the other current answer, I feel that the new wording is excellent, and is in line with the idea of providing effective feedback. It is an affirmative statement that provides transparency to the person whose question you're voting to close: It lets them know that not only is it your opinion that there's something wrong with their post, but that you're taking action based on that opinion. It's firm, rather than using weak language like the previous wording, but still is worded in a way which doesn't present your opinion as fact, as would be the case with "This question is off topic because [...]". I believe that reading this in a "tattle-tale" tone misrepresents the message and that this verbiage is a significant improvement.

  • 2
    Thing is, when I use this close reason I neither want to communicate my opinion nor my voting habits, I want to tell OP e.g. "no, SO is not for legal questions" - which is a fact. For people actually using this reason correctly, namely for questions that definitely are off topic, it only dilutes the communication. – l4mpi Jan 28 '15 at 8:49
-15

The wording sucks, everybody hates it, putting a label on it isn't that important. SE staff is just trying to redirect their busy complaint inbox to SO users. They want YOU to receive the complaint, not them. Because you posted the comment and they had nothing to do with it and can't do anything about it.

They should man-up and emulate the Bangalore call center. A friendly voice that never runs out of patience and always has the soothing standard answer that's been optimized through many uses. But that's not something we have any control over, this is one-sided editing without any community input. It is their site, not ours. Ultimate goal is to get you to stop using it and not get you to complain about it because you can always use it if you want to.

  • 1
    ...what? I can appreciate wanting to curb the really, really poor usage of the custom close reason, but stop using it altogether? That sounds incredibly backwards – Makoto Jan 27 '15 at 23:44
  • "because you can always use it if you want to". That does not mean you have to stop using it. – Hans Passant Jan 28 '15 at 0:01
  • But that contradicts the ultimate goal, or was I missing something? – Makoto Jan 28 '15 at 0:02
  • I don't know what "contracts" means. Contradicts? No, the goal is to redirect the complaints. – Hans Passant Jan 28 '15 at 0:03
  • What wording do you want? – BradleyDotNET Jan 28 '15 at 0:25
  • 6
    It is a problem with the question, not with me. I know what a good question looks like, I've answered fourteen thousand of them. So "This question is off-topic because ..." is pretty unambiguous in my ears. Not like you could not find out who said it, is there? – Hans Passant Jan 28 '15 at 0:31
  • I could live with that wording. It lacks the wishy-washiness of "This question appears to be off-topic" and as you say, commentors are always expressing their opinions anyways. – BradleyDotNET Jan 28 '15 at 0:35

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .