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I recently asked this question: https://stackoverflow.com/q/27930731/1042555

It appears that a lot of people think it's a bad question, and no one thinks it's good.

To be fair, the initial version of my question contained some bugs and syntax errors, and I should have been less lazy and checked the code first. I later tried to edit to correct these.

Anyhow, the question isn't really subjective. One could mistakenly reply with a subjective answer (e.g. "I don't think you should use the second version because I think it's ugly", one commenter said something along these lines but didn't quite explain) but then I believe subjective answers are already not allowed. I was specifically interested in more concrete answers: For instance, perhaps a respected GUI guru has written a book (unknown to me) where they explain why one of these is a bad idea, and someone would submit that as an answer. I also tried to make this clear in an edit (this was reverted by Will after I asked this question here on MSO).

To be clear, I'm not trying to whine about my question being downvoted/closed. Regardless of moderation, I have 2 downvotes and no upvotes, and that's sufficient to convince that the question is inappropriate regardless of the reason.

I would, however, like to understand the reason:

  1. Is the problem that I phrased it such that it appears to invite subjective responses?
  2. Is the problem that I unknowingly suggested an unpopular practice?
  3. Are questions about best practices considered inappropriate as a rule? For instance, "Is using goto a bad idea?" isn't really a matter of opinion, and can be answered with logical arguments. Is that still not good enough?
  4. Did I just shoot myself in the foot by not checking with an IDE that my code is correct, and everyone was too pissed off by the time I corrected it?
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    "How do I decide which one to use?" This line definitely doesn't help, in my reading of it. No matter what disclaimer you add, you're going to end up with people giving their opinions on which to pick, why, or how to decide yourself. Also, re you're "3.": It can be answered with logical arguments, but I know there are programmers out there who just love goto even if the rest of us do consider it a bad idea. They can post their opinon just the same as anyone else. "Best practices" from what I've seen tend to not work out well. – Kendra Jan 13 '15 at 21:29
  • I think your downvotes probably came from posting code that wouldn't compile. Always at least test your code before posting it here. – eddie_cat Jan 13 '15 at 21:31
  • @gnat First of all, that really doesn't answer what I was asking at all. I know how to know if my code is easily maintainable: If a year later, I can come back and maintain it easily, then it is. The question is supposed to save me time by learning from the mistakes of others. Second, I have no peers. I only write code for my own use. – Superbest Jan 13 '15 at 21:36
  • @gnat Is there a reason you are linking me to these very general questions? – Superbest Jan 13 '15 at 21:42
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    @Superbest I think the point of that last link is that you should ask questions on Code Review if your aim is to figure out how to make your code "better" but still functionally the same. "Peer" does not mean someone who is physically working with you, it could be any other developer familiar with what you are doing. – eddie_cat Jan 13 '15 at 21:47
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Is the problem that I phrased it such that it appears to invite subjective responses?

Yes. On top of that, you didn't even edit the question in response to the comments stating it was opinion based to make the question not be opinion based. You just left all of that in there.

Of course, had you actually edited the question to be very clearly not subjective at all, and to be entirely objective, you'd only have succeeded in making the question very concretely Too Broad instead of Too Subjective, so it wouldn't really have gotten you anywhere.

Is the problem that I unknowingly suggested an unpopular practice?

I doubt it, although nobody can know why anyone else choose to vote.

Are questions about best practices considered inappropriate as a rule? For instance, "Is using goto a bad idea?" isn't really a matter of opinion, and can be answered with logical arguments. Is that still not good enough?

Pretty much, yes. It absolutely is a matter of opinion, particularly as you've phrased the question.

Did I just shoot myself in the foot by not checking with an IDE that my code is correct, and everyone was too pissed off by the time I corrected it?

Not really, most people didn't even notice it and still felt the question wasn't good, or at least that's what the comments indicated. It does more or less give you your answer though; when you have multiple errors throughout one solution it definitely tell you which one you're going to struggle to implement correctly.

  • I disagree with your remark at the end: Any code I type in the browser is going to have many errors anyway, since I don't have IntelliSense, and all of the errors I made would have been immediately flagged by my IDE. So this doesn't answer at all which one will be harder to maintain with in the future. I'd also disagree that I did not address the comments (I did, and the comments did not clearly explain what was so subjective about it) but it's probably pointless to argue over that. – Superbest Jan 13 '15 at 21:40
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    @Superbest If you can't type meaningful code using the browser IDE then don't use the browser IDE when writing your question and copy it over from a coding IDE. That said, only one of your two major errors were compile time errors; the other was a bug only exposed at runtime, and even then not in a way that would throw an exception. Regardless, that whole bit isn't really relevant to the question; it's an offtopic tangent. – Servy Jan 13 '15 at 21:42
  • Also, Re: "Is using goto a bad idea?" being considered subjective - if others can confirm this, I'll accept this as an answer. – Superbest Jan 13 '15 at 21:44
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    @Superbest As I said myself, editing the question just to say that it's not subjective doesn't make it not subjective. If you ask a subjective question and then follow it up with, "don't provide a subjective answer, provide only facts" then you have done nothing to make the actual question not subjective, rather you've just prohibited any actual answers. You need to edit the actual question(s) being asked to be asking inherently objective, rather than subjective, questions. – Servy Jan 13 '15 at 21:44
  • I would appreciate it if you made two things clear: First, do you consider that it's possible for my question to be asked in a non-subjective way at all? Second, if so, exactly what would I need to change to satisfy you? – Superbest Jan 13 '15 at 21:46
  • @Superbest How is it not subjective. I can think it's a good idea, and you can think it's a bad idea, and neither of us can possibly be objectively wrong. "good idea" has no objective basis by which something can be definitively proven. It is an opinion. Now you could ask entirely objective questions about the use of goto, but asking "is it a good idea" isn't one of them. – Servy Jan 13 '15 at 21:46
  • @Superbest I answered that right in my question. You could make it objective, but then you'd just be making it Too Broad. It still wouldn't be answerable. – Servy Jan 13 '15 at 21:47
  • Well, to be brief, I believe what you consider subjective is different from what SO rules consider subjective. I may be wrong, which is why I said I will accept this as an answer if others agree. If you have constructive feedback about the question itself, please post it in the comment thread or submit an edit. – Superbest Jan 13 '15 at 21:53
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    @Superbest In what way is my answer inconsistent with SE's definition of "subjective". – Servy Jan 13 '15 at 21:54
  • In the following way: You appear to be implying that a question about the use of goto is necessarily too subjective, regardless of phrasing (since you've said "particularly as you've phrased it", from which I understand that if I had phrased it otherwise you would still consider it subjective, if not particularly so). – Superbest Jan 13 '15 at 22:08
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    @Superbest The question that you asked, "is using X a good idea" is inherently subjective. What X is is irrelevant. That's completely different than saying that any question about the use of goto is subjective; I didn't say that at all. – Servy Jan 13 '15 at 22:11
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    @Superbest When someone asks "Is using goto a bad idea?", they are asking a subjective question, not because all questions about the use of goto are inherently subjective, but because this question leaves the door wide open to the answerer's preferences. Some are adamant that goto hurts readability. Well, maybe their capability to read code is harmed by goto but I've read and written kernel code that I found definitely more readable with judicious goto statements than with long-winded ifs. So, yep, opinion-based. And readability is just one aspect of the question. – Louis Jan 13 '15 at 23:37

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