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I find it frustrating when I ask a question (and I see this on plenty of other questions) and offer a simplified example, only for someone to then ask

Why do you want to do it that way?

Very often I'm doing it that way for one or more of several reasons:

  • adhering to current practice in a legacy application
  • because that's the way my boss has told me he wants it done
  • because I've offered a simplified abstraction of the problem to aid comprehension, and if I were to take an hour or so to write out a fuller explanation then you'd understand why

In my opinion, it's not the answerer's place to ask why I've headed down this road but simply to help me find a solution.

I accept that there are times when a dev has inadvertently headed in the wrong direction and needs steered back on track, but I often see this as the first comment, which I find lazy.

A good developer opens the code, comprehends what's it front of them and works with it, gradually improving things if need be; a lesser developer opens the code, realises it's not the way that they would do things and then spends time changing everything to suit their style.

So I see these why comments as being in the "that's not the way I'd do it, why don't you do it the same way as me?" vein rather than providing a solution.

Although there's always room for guidance, we come to StackOverflow for help, not to be preached to.

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    Too many askers on Stack Overflow have the XY Problem. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem. Asking "why" is often the only right thing to do. But I agree, simply asking "why do you want to do it that way" with no context is a bit lazy
    – Pekka
    Jan 6, 2015 at 9:49
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    ^^ XY problems. If a truck driver asks for directions to the nearest highway to Deadsville, do you blindly give them, or tell them that the bridge is out and they're just wasting fuel? OK, they might be on their way to repair the bridge, but asking for more context is not unreasonable in many cases. Jan 6, 2015 at 9:55
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    @MartinJames: Well, you are standing right before the truck. Chance is, that's all the context you need. (=> Analogies are imperfect) ;-) Jan 6, 2015 at 10:26
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    @Deduplicator he's asking in the dinner by the road. You can't see the truck :P Jan 6, 2015 at 10:28
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    An example of these kind of questions is the topic of sorting. A typical student assignment is to write a bubble sort -- but if he runs into problems doing so and asks for help, "Use the library function qsort" is not a good answer. But we have to know that using library functions is not relevant!
    – Jongware
    Jan 6, 2015 at 10:33
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    Admittedly this is a duplicate. But how am I supposed to search and find a question with a title like that :)
    – awj
    Jan 6, 2015 at 10:46
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    Related on global meta: Why do people question every question?
    – AakashM
    Jan 6, 2015 at 10:56
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    If you know you're doing something in a non-standard/less-than-ideal way you should at least indicate in your question that you are aware of alternatives. Otherwise how are we supposed to know you're not just making things harder on yourself needlessly?
    – eddie_cat
    Jan 6, 2015 at 14:15
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    "Unclear what you are asking" is a close reason. If you need to do something stupid, please include them, for reasons of clarity, in the question. Problem mofuggen solved.
    – user1228
    Jan 6, 2015 at 14:48

1 Answer 1

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In short: don't hide information that could help you get a better answer.

In my opinion, it's not the answerer's place to ask why I've headed down this road but simply to help me find a solution.

It is, however, the asker's job to provide the appropriate context to get a useful solution. Things like "I'm working in a legacy application" can have a lot of influence in what an answerer will provide as an answer. A legacy application context is a lot different than, well, a non-legacy application context. By mentioning it the asker maximises the chances of getting a usable solution in that context, and minimises the chances of getting correct answers to the question as posed, but useless for the actual problem that the asker wants solved.

Basically, if the context imposes restrictions on solutions, it should not go unspoken.

A good developer opens the code, comprehends what's it front of them and works with it, gradually improving things if need be; a lesser developer opens the code, realises it's not the way that they would do things and then spends time changing everything to suit their style.

When I see code that is done in a strange way for no reason, I will ask why. You should ask why. You should not go around "gradually improving", nor "changing everything" before you have answered that. I think it's a natural reaction to find strange code strange and to expect strange reasons behind strange code. Working on it without finding those strange reasons first sounds like a recipe for trouble to me.

because I've offered a simplified abstraction of the problem to aid comprehension, and if I were to take an hour or so to write out a fuller explanation then you'd understand why

Now, even in this scenario, an asker should mention that the actual problem is more complicated than the one posed, and possibly a short summary of what complications were omitted. Knowing that, answerers can ask for tiny bits of extra information that may help provide better answers, without asking for the whole problem. It also helps identify when the original problem was over-simplified to the point of having simple solutions that can't be mapped on the original problem.

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  • Yep, I agree on all of your points. However, the rationale behind asking why is never black and white, and too often when the OP explains why the commenter responds with "that's not the way I work". My point is, there's asking for more detail, then there's questioning the background. There's more than one way to skin a proverbial cat (allegedly) and when someone asks for help, asking why they're skinning cat isn't helpful. In short, you're right, but I feel that some commenters are asking for the wrong reasons.
    – awj
    Jan 6, 2015 at 10:43
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    Then just ignore them. If you've stated you're working under certain constraints and they don't get that, there's no point in entering into an argument about it. If the comments get rude, you can flag them.
    – nkjt
    Jan 6, 2015 at 11:38

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