-6

This question already has an answer here:

So recently I've noticed a slight tendency to post answers in comments, for whatever reason. It often really pisses me off. You have a perfectly valid answer but instead you are posting it as a comment, why? Actually, don't answer that, it's irrelevant.

So, back to the point. Today I snapped and did this. It was a bad idea. I know, but it gave the message across, I guess.

So, what does the community think a user should do when he sees an answer in a comment? Should it copy but change it slightly (to prevent "plagiarism")? Does it really matter to change it slightly at that point? Should it """take inspiration""" from that?

marked as duplicate by gnat, LittleBobbyTables, Martin James, Makoto, ThisSuitIsBlackNot Jan 2 '15 at 18:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 8
    I've answered plenty of questions in a comment because the question was trivial, I was going to vote to close, and/or I didn't care about getting any rep. For example, someone has a typo in their code; I'll comment "You're missing a semi-colon on line 5", and vote to close as a typo, because the question is of no value to anyone else except the author. If a comment as an answer pisses you off that much, maybe it's time to re-evaluate priorities. – LittleBobbyTables Jan 2 '15 at 17:39
  • 5
    If you're going to use a comment from another user as an answer, you should rightly cite it, whether you "take inspiration" from it or copy it verbatim. It's only right. It's more right the more you copy of it and the less of it is your own work. Now if you just use the basis of the comment to research the answer and flesh out your own, 100% complete answer, the citation might not be required... But giving credit for the pointer is still polite. – Kendra Jan 2 '15 at 17:40
  • ITT: answers only on comments, to piss me off even more or because that's """clever""". Got it? I hate answers in comments, so there should be answers only on comments. That's so funny. – Shoe Jan 2 '15 at 17:41
  • 3
    Lighten up, Francis – LittleBobbyTables Jan 2 '15 at 17:41
  • 4
    If you're going to use another person's work as your own you don't make superfluous changes to make it not be plagiarism, you cite it. Making superfluous changes makes it still technically plagiarism, but just harder to prove. Citing it makes it not actually be plagiarism. – Servy Jan 2 '15 at 17:43
  • see also questions listed in Burninate: [answers-as-comments] – gnat Jan 2 '15 at 17:44
  • 1
    You could post a Community Wiki answer, and credit the original author within that answer with a link to the comment and their profile. – Doorknob Jan 2 '15 at 17:57
  • @Doorknob冰 So wait, do I have to link to the profile too? Doesn't the comment already imply the user? Oh boi, this work is becoming tedious. I might just go back to not giving a crap. Seems less tiresome. – Shoe Jan 2 '15 at 18:19
  • 3
    @Jefffrey See Jeff Atwood's post on attribution that is linked at the bottom of every page (in the part that says "user contributions licensed under cc by-sa 3.0 with attribution required") for exactly what needs to be included in an attribution. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Jan 2 '15 at 18:22
  • Just flag the original comment as "Obsolete". One of the mods will instantly delete it, bam, problem solved. – Hans Passant Jan 2 '15 at 19:08
0

If you're going to use a comment from another user as an answer, you should rightly cite it, whether you "take inspiration" from it or copy it verbatim. It's only right. It's more right the more you copy of it and the less of it is your own work. Now if you just use the basis of the comment to research the answer and flesh out your own, 100% complete answer, the citation might not be required... But giving credit for the pointer is still polite.

  • 6
  • @Martinho , wouldn't it be better to put the citation above... in the body?? and possibly in quotations ? rather than a comment? I just think it'd be nicer ;-) – Coffee Jan 2 '15 at 18:12
  • 4
    But then it wouldn't be stolen! :P – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 2 '15 at 18:13
  • Martinho - bah ! jokes jokes , smh – Coffee Jan 2 '15 at 18:13
  • 2
    I had to downvote this but that's only part of the joke. +1 in hypothetical terms. – Lightness Races with Monica Jan 2 '15 at 18:15
  • 1
    Oh.. are we only doing hypotheticals? I'll take my real upvote back then. – Martin James Jan 2 '15 at 18:20
  • How dare you! (I see what you did here. Nice. ;) – Kendra Jan 2 '15 at 19:17
10

There may be plenty of reasons a user choose not to answer. It is possible they do not feel the comment is sufficient to address the question, it is possible they voted to close and do not believe in answering closed-worthy questions, it is possible the comment only addressed part of the question and they don't know the answer to the rest (or maybe it is a combination of all 3).

But if you feel a comment sufficiently answers the question, then it is fair game, but you need to be proper about it.

In my opinion there is a big difference between blatant plagiarism and using a comment as inspiration for an answer. If you are going to take most of the content from a comment and provide it as your own answer without adding any original material, then the user who provided the original content must be cited. You should treat this as you would any other professional writing.

If you take a comment for inspiration an provide your own answer complete with your own original work, then a citation is less necessary but is still better than not citing it at all.

  • 2
    It is also generally preferred that you mark the answer as a community wiki if it is not your own work (as in, copy-pasted). I've done this before myself in a similar situation, removing an answer from the question body. – animuson Jan 2 '15 at 17:45
  • 1
    Why cite someone that didn't consider it an answer? How is "plain plagiarism" any different than taking the comment and changing few words (or put in a better tone, again with 3 quotes: """take inspiration""" from it). At least by copying word by word you are being sincere. – Shoe Jan 2 '15 at 17:46
  • @animuson It's a common convention, but it's certainly not required. It's not wrong to post it as a traditional answer. Of course, by doing so you're taking responsibility for the content's validity and quality. – Servy Jan 2 '15 at 17:46
  • @animuson I didn't know about that. Thanks. Then may I ask why didn't you remove the comment and made that a community wiki? – Shoe Jan 2 '15 at 17:47
  • 4
    Why cite someone that didn't consider it an answer? Are they your words? No? Then cite them. – LittleBobbyTables Jan 2 '15 at 17:47
  • @LittleBobbyTables Words are of nobody. They are simple words. – Shoe Jan 2 '15 at 17:47
  • 5
    @Jefffrey You cite it because it's illegal to claim another person's intellectual property as your own. It doesn't matter if it's an answer, a comment, or a scribble on the back of a napkin. It's another person's property, not yours. – Servy Jan 2 '15 at 17:47
  • 2
    @Jefffrey - Words are of nobody. They are simple words. Now you're either just trolling or being obtuse, I can't tell which. – LittleBobbyTables Jan 2 '15 at 17:47
  • @LittleBobbyTables I'm probably just stupid. Not everything that goes against your belief is "trolling". – Shoe Jan 2 '15 at 17:48
  • @Jefffrey The individual words, yes, the ideas the can be combined to describe, no. – Servy Jan 2 '15 at 17:48
  • @Servy Then if you think your words are worth that much, get them copyrighted or something. Or defend them. I'm not taking the content from another answer, I'm taking the content from someone else's comment. Two completely different semantics. – Shoe Jan 2 '15 at 17:50
  • 9
    @Jefffrey Copyright is implicit. It is in fact there. When the content is posted to SO it is also licensed under the CC-wiki, giving everyone in the world the right to distribute the content and created derived works from it, so long as the content is appropriately cited when used. This all applies to comments just as much as answers. The fact that you are stealing content from a comment, not an answer, doesn't make it any more okay. As far as intellectual property rights are concerned, comments and answers are identical. – Servy Jan 2 '15 at 17:53
  • @Jefffrey RE your 2nd paragraph.... I doubt you really got any message across. I am sure the author of the comment that inspired this post doesn't feel the comment was appropriate for a complete answer or he would have left it as an answer. – psubsee2003 Jan 2 '15 at 17:53
  • 1
    @Jefffrey then post it and cite it exactly as I said (especially if you are going to make an almost word-for-word copy.). I am virtually certain that the author of that comment would approve :-) – psubsee2003 Jan 2 '15 at 17:54
  • 4
    @Jefffrey Then you can post it as one, so long as you cite it appropriately. – Servy Jan 2 '15 at 17:54
3

I agree that this "answers as comments" nonsense is getting out of hand. Stack Overflow is not a chat room or forum or message board (indeed, its entire reason for being is to not be these things) and yet people are starting to treat it as such, ignoring the proper process for delivering answers to OPs.

There are some exceptions where it's okay, like when the question itself is a complete write-off and is never going to remain open or the solution was a stupid little typo and I'm going to get the question deleted thereafter as soon as possible.

I'd say that, in this case, the comment you stole was borderline. I honestly don't know whether I'd have posted it as a comment or an answer in this situation.

I certainly don't blame you for posting the same notion as an answer, but you should not have simply copy/pasted it word for word without any attribution whatsoever. Despite the fact that we do not accrue rep on meta, that sort of behaviour is simply dishonest, and violates the licence terms of the originally-posted content (so you're going to jail, sucka).

  • I had to upvote this. – Shoe Jan 2 '15 at 18:16
  • 2
    There was a very specific reason I didn't make it an answer - I didn't want to make it searchable. It exposed somewhat of a loophole that is known and you deserved to understand the mechanics, but I didn't want it to be easily found by anyone after that question falls off the front page – psubsee2003 Jan 2 '15 at 18:24
  • 1
    We need a "send OP to jail" flag option :D – Infinite Recursion Jan 2 '15 at 18:39
  • @psubsee2003: Personally I think making something searchable or not searchable is the role of Stack Overflow and the way its developers decide to handle closed questions, not something that we should attempt to achieve ourselves by "social engineering" and posting stuff in patently the wrong place. I appreciated the comment of course. – Lightness Races with Monica Jan 2 '15 at 18:51
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit on the whole, yes, I would agree. But Meta is different. Do we really need to to make "This is how you get your bounty to an unanswered question back" easier to find? – psubsee2003 Jan 2 '15 at 18:54
1

I have to echo Servy's comment, we should not copy without attribution.

Although I can see why you might be annoyed, I'm not sure there's anything at all we can do about it.

And plagiarism is not "plagiarism" , it is simply plagiarism which is well-defined and against our policy

0

The proper thing to do is post the comment as a community wiki, giving attribution to the author.

Specifically, I'm paraphrasing this:

You could post a Community Wiki answer, and credit the original author within that answer with a link to the comment and their profile.

Or maybe this:

It is also generally preferred that you mark the answer as a community wiki if it is not your own work (as in, copy-pasted). I've done this before myself in a similar situation, removing an answer from the question body.

Or maybe this:

@Jefffrey Then you can post it as one, so long as you cite it appropriately.

What about this?

@Jefffrey You cite it because it's illegal to claim another person's intellectual property as your own. It doesn't matter if it's an answer, a comment, or a scribble on the back of a napkin. It's another person's property, not yours.

I'm not sure.

  • 4
    Marking the post as CW is a convention that some people use, as it does indicate that the content is not your own. It is not a requirement. Citing the works however is a requirement, and marking the post as CW doesn't change that. – Servy Jan 2 '15 at 18:14
  • @Servy So, am I allowed to take reputation from someone else comment as long as I cite it? – Shoe Jan 2 '15 at 18:20
  • 1
    You're allowed to post an answer that cite's another person's comment. People are allowed to upvote that answer if they feel that it is helpful. They're also allowed to downvote it if they feel that it's not helpful. Can you potentially earn reputation by providing correctly cited content of another person, yes; will you necessarily earn reputation, no. – Servy Jan 2 '15 at 18:23

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .