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Recently I have seen a lot of similar questions that boil down to same idea:

I need to select values from my table that have a row meeting one requirement and another row meeting another requirement.

To explain what I mean, consider this table:

| student | course  |
+---------+---------+
|  Adam   | Math    |
|  Adam   | Science |
|  John   | Math    |
|  John   | Science |
|  Jane   | Math    |
|  Jane   | Physics |

I want to pull all students who are taking both math and science. This means Adam and John should be returned.

I have seen these questions a lot, and they are always under different names that are often related to the project itself. Is there a tag for this type of problem, and a way to mark them as duplicates?

Here are two examples of questions I've seen in the last few days alone.

Both questions could be solved in the same way, but it's a stretch and difficult to mark them as duplicates.

What can we do to not only remove duplicate problems, but also make it easier for new users to find these questions in the future as to avoid creating more duplicates?

EDIT

Thanks to the comments, I have learned that this sort of question is known as relational division. However, I imagine this may remain unknown to many users (such as myself until today) and I'm wondering if there's anything we can do to flag duplicates and/or make it easier for new users to find these questions.

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    I've always known this to be relational division. And there is a tag for it. – Taryn Dec 23 '14 at 15:22
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    You know, I've always wondered this, and never thought to ask. – LittleBobbyTables - Au Revoir Dec 23 '14 at 15:25
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    @bluefeet thanks for sharing. I've never heard of it, and a tag does exist. The description also considers it as 'The inverse of a Cartesian Product'. – AdamMc331 Dec 23 '14 at 15:26
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    Perhaps it'd be a good idea to create a well written relatively generic form of this question (if one doesn't exist yet) and then close the others as duplicate. – CodesInChaos Dec 23 '14 at 21:05
  • @CodesInChaos do you have an idea what that might look like? – AdamMc331 Dec 23 '14 at 21:12
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    The "generic form" that CodesInChaos refers to is called a canonical question in Stack parlance. See Syntax error due to using a reserved word as a table or column name in MySQL for just one example (you can search for "canonical" on Meta to find many more). – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Dec 23 '14 at 21:26
  • That's certainly an idea. Any way to tell if one exists already? I suppose I could search through the relational division tag, since there's not a lot of questions. – AdamMc331 Dec 23 '14 at 21:28
  • The "Frequent" tab for a particular tag shows the most-linked-to posts in that tag, i.e. the ones that are probably most suitable to be canonical posts already. I think it would be tough to make a decent canonical that works for all RDBMS's; since the two examples you pointed out are MySQL, I would find the most general MySQL Q/A pair in that list and start closing similar questions as duplicates of it. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Dec 23 '14 at 21:37
  • @ThisSuitIsBlackNot I understand I only linked to MySQL but this is a question that could apply to any and all RDBMS, and the solution may or may not vary greatly. – AdamMc331 Dec 23 '14 at 21:52
  • If you can write a solution that applies to all RDBMS and isn't a mile long, go for it. In general, this is difficult for SQL questions, so I think it's usually better to pick a separate canonical for each RDBMS. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Dec 23 '14 at 21:54
  • @ThisSuitIsBlackNot I have posted one, see the comments to the answer on this discussion. While yes, it may change, I am unaware of DBMS that don't include the IN operator (which is just the first example I gave). It may need some fine tuning, and if it has to be deleted then so be it but I felt like being proactive and getting something out there. – AdamMc331 Dec 23 '14 at 21:57
7

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We already have 154 questions tagged relational division and probably many more on the same concept that have not been tagged.

There is no need to create yet another QA pair. Just look at the top voted answers in the tag.

I'd personally go for this one as the answers show many different ways to skin the cat. And perhaps edit the question to make it more easily searchable.

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5

Consider posting yourself a canonical question using the description you gave here, as it is quite synthetic and very clear:

Consider this table:

| student | course  |
+---------+---------+
|  Adam   | Math    |
|  Adam   | Science |
|  John   | Math    |
|  John   | Science |
|  Jane   | Math    |
|  Jane   | Physics |

I want to pull all students who are taking both math and science. This means Adam and John should be returned.

Then post -- and self-accept -- a community wiki answer that we could edit to provide the solution for various RDBMS.

I don't think there is a tag for ? If you are afraid for your question being closed as a duplicate -- add some header on top of it explaining this is a canonical question. Such notice is probably a good idea anyhow...

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  • I have no problem doing this, in fact I like the solution a lot, but would I be doing so in fear of my own question being marked as duplicate? Should I simply ask and self-accept the question? – AdamMc331 Dec 23 '14 at 21:40
  • @McAdam331 Add a notice on the top of the question specifying it is a canonical question -- maybe referencing this meta post? Anyhow, closed or not, this isn't a real issue once you will have posted and self-accepted the "canonical answer". – Sylvain Leroux Dec 23 '14 at 21:42
  • How's this? – AdamMc331 Dec 23 '14 at 21:50
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    Well, since this is the discussion, thanks for editing the SO post. I would hate to flag questions I've already answered and help with, but I will start referencing this next time I see it. – AdamMc331 Dec 23 '14 at 21:54
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    @McAdam331 I've edited a little bit the "notice". Feel free to revert if you want. – Sylvain Leroux Dec 23 '14 at 21:57
  • I appreciate it. I don't think it's a problem. Unfortunately, I can't accept the answer for a couple days, but that may be a good thing. I'd like to make sure this does what we want it to. – AdamMc331 Dec 23 '14 at 22:00
  • @McAdam331 Be prepared to make a little bit of proselytism during that period as the concepts of "canonical answer" and "community wiki" are not necessary well understood ;) Good luck with that. – Sylvain Leroux Dec 23 '14 at 22:16
  • I agree with all of this except making it community wiki. If you're willing to put in the effort to make a truly great canonical answer, you deserve rep for it. Editing non-CW posts isn't particularly difficult anyway. (Of course, if you want to make it CW for your own reasons, go for it.) – Chris Hayes Dec 25 '14 at 4:32

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