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Every time I want to ask in Stack Overflow, it takes me lots of time. It says "Your title is not good", "Your body is not good".

For example, I spent lots of time to ask a question about namespaces, but it said "Title is not ...". I examined the title is more than 10 words, but why it's really hard to ask?

As I'm asking this question, it says again "The body does not ..."

closed as unclear what you're asking by Louis, IronMan84, Infinite Recursion, Martijn Pieters, Aza Dec 22 '14 at 20:54

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Then please read stackoverflow.com/help carefully, also stackoverflow.com/help/quality-standards-error – Maroun Dec 22 '14 at 8:38
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    Top tip: Start every sentence with a capital letter, and make sure that every "i" (when talking about yourself) is capitalized as well ("I"). No matter your language skills, that should be a simple recipe you can apply everywhere. – Bart Dec 22 '14 at 8:49
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    Second tip: questions end with a "?". Ellipsis is exactly three ".", no more, no less. No space before punctuation, space after. Capitals are important, trademarks and proper names usually take them (like Stack Overflow), other ordinary words don't unless they start a sentence. Code markup only for code. – Mat Dec 22 '14 at 9:15
  • Along with the support reading material suggested above, take some time to review How do I ask a good question?. – user4039065 Dec 22 '14 at 9:16
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    @rene And on their latest question, this useless comment: "Search the web before asking here." We're such a warm community. – user3920237 Dec 22 '14 at 10:17
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    Please give us an example of the text you wanted to use as title and body. We might be able to help you then. – Patrick Hofman Dec 22 '14 at 10:30
  • @rene Is SO's mission to teach the world how to ask good questions, or to provide enthusiastic response to bad questions? Not that I can see in stackoverflow.com/tour . We're doing fine then. – Pascal Cuoq Dec 22 '14 at 12:37
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For example, I spent lots of time to ask a question about namespaces

This is the question you asked, under the title "Namespace in python":

I'm learning python I don't know what is namespace meaning? I search it but I couldn't understand it.

   can you explain me namespace?

There are a number of things wrong with this question. Starting with the title: it is short, not descriptive of your specific problem, and is missing proper capitalization on Python.

Moving on to the body: it appears that you corrected the capitalization and punctuation of the original three sentences, but you then tried to game the quality system by making your fourth uncorrected sentence a code block. That's not the right way to try to fix things.

At a base level, your question is far too broad. "I don't know what is namespace meaning" is a concept that can be found in a textbook or documentation, and asking us to regurgitate the entire description back to you isn't particularly helpful. Narrow this down to where you are having trouble with what the documentation states. What specific part of this concept are you having difficulty with? Can you provide code to illustrate where you're struggling?

The system implements quality safeguards to make you stop and think about the presentation of your question. Short questions without proper punctuation are likely to be hasty and poorly specified, so that's why you're asked to spend a little more time with those and elaborate on your problem and your attempts so far.

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Asking in Stack Overflow is really hard

It's not - once you get used to it, and understand the level of effort you have to put in.

The reason we want a quality question from you (and everyone else) is because the site wants to provide high quality content for all users and visitors.
Good questions paired with high quality answers not only help the person asking, but also anyone else with the same or similar issue finding the question and answer.

The amazing thing about Stack is there are many professionals here providing answers with best practice and extremely expert advice.
To obtain such advice you need to ask a good question.

A good question includes things like good spelling, grammar, and punctuation, as these make your question easy to read which allow users to concentrate on the actual problem or question.
As well as the question being very clear and easy to understand for someone who is new to your scenario.

Poor questions simply:

  • Waste your time
  • Waste other's time trying to understand your question or what you want
  • Create low quality content on the site - which helps no-one, not even you
  • Create the need for community to action it - flagging and reviewing to put it on hold

If the result is all that above, and you still haven't obtained help or an answer to your question, what is the point?


So if you are being warned your question is poor, low quality etc, and received downvotes and possibly closed, take it as a sign that you need to improve your question, perhaps putting some more time and effort into it.
In turn, you'll receive great advice, an answer which answers your question, and at the same time you'll be helping others with similar issues as you.

BradLarson has kindly gone through one of your questions, and outlined where you can improve.
Hopefully you will read his answer thoroughly, and between mine and Brad's answers you'll understand how to improve your questions, and why good questions are required.

If this doesn't appeal to you, and want to just quickly ask any old question without much effort etc, then there are many forums and other options in the internet which cater for this.

If you do not care about making good questions, or other users also gaining help and advice from your questions, then perhaps Stack is not the right place for you.

I hope you do read the help section, and answers here, and learn what is required from you.
As then you will receive expert advice which will only help you become a better developer.

Reading and Help

Why do I see a message that my question does not meet quality standards?
Help Center
How to ask a good question

  • It is already a great answer but maybe you can add some of the links that are provided by the commenters under the question? And maybe point out the that good also means spelling? – rene Dec 22 '14 at 19:18
  • @rene Done. Although, not everyone thought it was a great answer. Gotta love meta downvotes... – James Dec 22 '14 at 20:17
  • Your not as low as my worst answer yet and not even close to the most downvoted post ever on this site. Thanks for the support in this case. – rene Dec 22 '14 at 20:19
  • Not sure I know why someone would down vote this, unless they strongly disagreed with your opening sentence. I know there are some who do. I'm not one of them, though, so have some unicorn points! – Andrew Barber Dec 22 '14 at 21:14
  • Or, maybe they down voted because you misspelled "Center"... ;-) – Andrew Barber Dec 22 '14 at 21:15
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    @AndrewBarber Ah yes, I should have seen that really. Others who struggle with the site (or English spellings, ahem.. :P) Actually I'll correct the centre, I do try to remember to use "center" when referencing Stack help center, to be consistent with the site spellings. – James Dec 22 '14 at 21:21
  • No, asking in Stack Overflow really is hard. It's like a group of users got together and decided to IMMEDIATELY stomp down on many questions that are honest, valuable, and legitimate. I just had it happen within 30 seconds of a new post, and I explicitly pointed out that I was meeting the two requirements listed to not be off-topic. And it was deleted. WTF - SO is broken. – Matthew Cornell Mar 7 '16 at 15:35

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